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Fear: The History of a Political Idea

Fear: The History of a Political Idea Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For many commentators, September 11 inaugurated a new era of fear. But as Corey Robin shows in his unsettling tour of the Western imagination--the first intellectual history of its kind--fear has shaped our politics and culture since time immemorial.

From the Garden of Eden to the Gulag Archipelago to today's headlines, Robin traces our growing fascination with political danger and disaster. As our faith in positive political principles recedes, he argues, we turn to fear as the justifying language of public life. We may not know the good, but we do know the bad. So we cling to fear, abandoning the quest for justice, equality, and freedom. But as fear becomes our intimate, we understand it less. In a startling reexamination of fear's greatest modern interpreters--Hobbes, Montesquieu, Tocqueville, and Arendt--Robin finds that writers since the eighteenth century have systematically obscured fear's political dimensions, diverting attention from the public and private authorities who sponsor and benefit from it. For fear, Robin insists, is an exemplary instrument of repression--in the public and private sector. Nowhere is this politically repressive fear--and its evasion--more evident than in contemporary America. In his final chapters, Robin accuses our leading scholars and critics of ignoring "Fear, American Style," which, as he shows, is the fruit of our most prized inheritances--the Constitution and the free market.

With danger playing an increasing role in our daily lives and justifying a growing number of government policies, Robin's Fear offers a bracing, and necessary, antidote to our contemporary culture of fear.

Synopsis:

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experimental demonstrations using cells as components of logic circuits, building toward computers incorporating biological components in their functioning.

About the Author

Corey Robin teaches political science at Brooklyn College, City University of New York. His writings have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, Raritan, Dissent, The Times Literary Supplement and American Political Science Review.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780195157024
Subtitle:
The History of a Political Idea
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Author:
Robin, Corey
Author:
null, Corey
Location:
New York
Subject:
Political science
Subject:
Fear
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
General Political Science
Subject:
Politics | Political Theory
Subject:
Political
Series Volume:
no. 184
Publication Date:
20041001
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
, 105 line illus.
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
6.2 x 9.2 x 1.2 in 1.444 lb

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General

Fear: The History of a Political Idea
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Product details 336 pages Oxford University Press - English 9780195157024 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The completion of the first draft of the human genome has led to an explosion of interest in genetics and molecular biology. The view of the genome as a network of interacting computational components is well-established, but researchers are now trying to reverse the analogy, by using living

organisms to construct logic circuits. The potential applications for such technologies is huge, ranging from bio-sensors, through industrial applications to drug delivery and diagnostics. This book would be the first to deal with the implementation of this technology, describing several working

experimental demonstrations using cells as components of logic circuits, building toward computers incorporating biological components in their functioning.

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