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1 Burnside Russia- Soviet States Post 1985

Inside Putin's Russia: Can There Be Reform Without Democracy?

by

Inside Putin's Russia: Can There Be Reform Without Democracy? Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Written by Andrew Jack, the Moscow Bureau Chief of the Financial Times, here is a revealing look at the meteoric rise of Vladimir Putin and his first term as president of Russia.

Drawing on interviews with Putin himself, and with a number of the country's leading figures, as well as many ordinary Russians, Jack describes how the former KGB official emerged from the shadows of the Soviet secret police and lowly government jobs to become the most powerful man in Russia. The author shows how Putin has defied domestic and foreign expectations, presiding over a period of strong economic growth, significant restructuring, and rising international prestige. Yet Putin himself remains a man of mystery and contradictions. Personally, he is the opposite of Boris Yeltsin. A former judo champion, he is abstemious, healthy, and energetic, but also evasive, secretive, and cautious. Politically, he has pursued a predominantly pro-western foreign policy and liberal economic reforms, but has pursued a hardline war in Chechnya and introduced tighter controls over parliament and the media and his opponents, moves which are reminiscent of the Soviet era. Through it all, Putin has united Russian society and maintained extraordinarily high popularity. Jack concludes that Putin's "liberal authoritarianism" may be unpalatable to the West, but is probably the best that Russia can do at this point in her history.

Inside Putin's Russia digs behind the rumors and speculation, illuminating Putin's character and the changing nature of the Russia he rules. Andrew Jack sheds light on Putin's thinking, style and effectiveness as president. With Putin's second term just beginning, this invaluable book offers important insights for anyone interested in the past, present, and future of Russia.

Review:

"In assessing Vladimir Putin's first term as Russia's president, Jack, Moscow bureau chief of the Financial Times, answers a very limited 'yes' to the subtitle's question. His finely wrought political record of the country's last four years argues that a detailed understanding of Russia's particular combination of circumstances — Cold War security-state trauma; out-of-control crony capitalism; a simmering, terror-centered civil war — make Putin's autocracy more comprehensible, if not palatable or sustainable. A familiar introductory profile of a smart, engaged Putin; sketches of gulag survivor culture; Putin's rise from Petersburg-based bureaucrat to Yeltsin's handpicked successor, then autocratic ruler; and Chechnya's role in shaping Putin's rule since his appointment to the presidency in 2000 (with subsequent elections) form the book's succinct first half. The book's second half finely renders the fallout from Russia's disastrous privatization in the 1990s; in chapters like 'Autumn of the Oligarchs,' Jack (The French Exception) sees Putin as attempting to get the power brokers created by Yeltsin to serve the country with a combination of shrewd legislation, media control and raw power. It can be tough to keep track of the players in the shady doings of Yukos, Lukoil and other energy companies still in the news, but Jack's familiarity with and skepticism of them makes for directed reading. The result is an excellent (and wary) political and economic overview of an often opaque U.S. ally. Agent, Andrew Nurnberg. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

International views of Russia have changed drastically in the last decade, due in part to the leadership of the decidedly pro-Western President Yeltsin. It was not without concern that we saw the next elected leader pulled from the ranks of the former KGB.

Andrew Jack, former Moscow bureau chief for the Financial Times, uses in-depth research and years of journalistic experience to bring us the first full picture of Vladimir Putin. Jack describes how Putin grew to become the most powerful man in Russia, defying domestic and foreign expectations and presiding over a period of strong economic growth, significant restructuring, and rising international prestige. Despite criticism of his handling of the war in Chechnya and of the controls he introduced on parliament and the media, Putin has united Russian society and maintained extraordinarily high popularity.

Inside Putin's Russia digs behind the rumors and speculation, illuminating Putin's character and the changing nature of the Russia he leads. It highlights some of the more troubling trends as he consolidates his leadership during a second presidential term marred by the Beslan tragedy, the attacks on Yukos and Russian policy towards Ukraine. Now with a new Epilogue by the author, this invaluable book offers important insights for anyone interested in the past, present, and future of Russia.

Synopsis:

The first full-length account of the rise of Vladimir Putin and his initial four years as the leader of Russia.

About the Author

Andrew Jack is Moscow bureau chief of the Financial Times. He has been based in Russia since 1998, covering the end of the Yeltsin era, the rise to power of Vladimir Putin, and his entire period in office. He was the Financial Times' Paris correspondent in the mid 1990s, and previously worked in London and New York. He is the author of The French Exception.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780195177978
Subtitle:
Can There Be Reform without Democracy?
Author:
Jack, Andrew
Author:
null, Andrew
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Location:
New York
Subject:
Political
Subject:
Presidents
Subject:
Former Soviet Union
Subject:
Politics | Comparative Politics | Russia
Subject:
Politics | Comparative Politics | Russia and Former Soviet Union
Subject:
Politics | Comparative Politics | Russia & Former Soviet Union
Series Volume:
SFA/R&D/052
Publication Date:
20041022
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
3 maps
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
6.3 x 9.3 x 1 in 1.45 lb

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Russia » Soviet States Post 1985

Inside Putin's Russia: Can There Be Reform Without Democracy? Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$13.50 In Stock
Product details 384 pages Oxford University Press - English 9780195177978 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In assessing Vladimir Putin's first term as Russia's president, Jack, Moscow bureau chief of the Financial Times, answers a very limited 'yes' to the subtitle's question. His finely wrought political record of the country's last four years argues that a detailed understanding of Russia's particular combination of circumstances — Cold War security-state trauma; out-of-control crony capitalism; a simmering, terror-centered civil war — make Putin's autocracy more comprehensible, if not palatable or sustainable. A familiar introductory profile of a smart, engaged Putin; sketches of gulag survivor culture; Putin's rise from Petersburg-based bureaucrat to Yeltsin's handpicked successor, then autocratic ruler; and Chechnya's role in shaping Putin's rule since his appointment to the presidency in 2000 (with subsequent elections) form the book's succinct first half. The book's second half finely renders the fallout from Russia's disastrous privatization in the 1990s; in chapters like 'Autumn of the Oligarchs,' Jack (The French Exception) sees Putin as attempting to get the power brokers created by Yeltsin to serve the country with a combination of shrewd legislation, media control and raw power. It can be tough to keep track of the players in the shady doings of Yukos, Lukoil and other energy companies still in the news, but Jack's familiarity with and skepticism of them makes for directed reading. The result is an excellent (and wary) political and economic overview of an often opaque U.S. ally. Agent, Andrew Nurnberg. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , International views of Russia have changed drastically in the last decade, due in part to the leadership of the decidedly pro-Western President Yeltsin. It was not without concern that we saw the next elected leader pulled from the ranks of the former KGB.

Andrew Jack, former Moscow bureau chief for the Financial Times, uses in-depth research and years of journalistic experience to bring us the first full picture of Vladimir Putin. Jack describes how Putin grew to become the most powerful man in Russia, defying domestic and foreign expectations and presiding over a period of strong economic growth, significant restructuring, and rising international prestige. Despite criticism of his handling of the war in Chechnya and of the controls he introduced on parliament and the media, Putin has united Russian society and maintained extraordinarily high popularity.

Inside Putin's Russia digs behind the rumors and speculation, illuminating Putin's character and the changing nature of the Russia he leads. It highlights some of the more troubling trends as he consolidates his leadership during a second presidential term marred by the Beslan tragedy, the attacks on Yukos and Russian policy towards Ukraine. Now with a new Epilogue by the author, this invaluable book offers important insights for anyone interested in the past, present, and future of Russia.

"Synopsis" by , The first full-length account of the rise of Vladimir Putin and his initial four years as the leader of Russia.
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