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1 Burnside Crime- Mobs and Organized Crime

This title in other editions

Dillinger's Wild Ride: The Year That Made America's Public Enemy Number One

by

Dillinger's Wild Ride: The Year That Made America's Public Enemy Number One Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In an era that witnessed the rise of celebrity outlaws like Baby Face Nelson, Pretty Boy Floyd, and Bonnie and Clyde, John Dillinger was the most famous and flamboyant of them all. Reports on the man and his misdeeds--spiced with accounts of his swashbuckling bravado and cool daring--provided an America worn down by the Great Depression with a salacious mix of sex and violence that proved irresistible.

In Dillinger's Wild Ride, Elliott J. Gorn provides a riveting account of the year between 1933 and 1934, when the Dillinger gang pulled over a dozen bank jobs, and stole hundreds of thousands of dollars. A dozen men--police, FBI agents, gangsters, and civilians--lost their lives in the rampage, and American newspapers breathlessly followed every shooting and jail-break. As Dillinger's wild year unfolded, the tale grew larger and larger in newspapers and newsreels, and even today, Dillinger is the subject of pulp literature, serious poetry and fiction, and films, including a new movie starring Johnny Depp. What is the power of his story? Why has it lingered so long? Who was John Dillinger? Gorn illuminates the significance of Dillinger's tremendous fame and the endurance of his legacy, arguing that he represented an American fascination with primitive freedom against social convention. Dillinger's story has much to tell us about our enduring fascination with outlaws, crime and violence, about the complexity of our transition from rural to urban life, and about the transformation of America during the Great Depression.

Dillinger's Wild Ride is a compulsively readable story with an unforgettable protagonist.

Review:

"Gorn (Mother Jones) presents a solid, unromanticized account of the last year in the short life of famed bank robber John Dillinger. Gorn rejects psychologizing about why Dillinger, the unexceptional if restless grocer's son, born in Indianapolis in 1903, turned to a life of crime, arrested first in 1924 for assaulting an elderly store clerk in a botched robbery. After spending nine years — almost a third of his short life — in jail, Dillinger found a Depression-era America far different from the one he'd left. Less than two months into his parole, Dillinger and the first in a revolving parade of Dillinger gang members robbed the Commercial Bank in Daleville, Ind., making off with $3,500. Between July 1933 and his death just one year later, Dillinger robbed more than 10 banks, killed at least five people (all lawmen) and stole over $300,000, all the while evading capture by local law enforcement and later the FBI. Gorn, who teaches at Brown University, relies on newspaper accounts and government documents (and, thankfully, no reconstructed dialogue) to plot the movements of a criminal who, 75 years after his death, still reverberates in the American consciousness. 30 b&w photos. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

In knowledge of most aspects of our collective history, most Americans probably would flunk even the easiest of tests, but in one department we are scholars of the first rank: We know our crooks. We don't just know them, we love them: Billy the Kid, Jesse James, Bonnie and Clyde, Baby Face Nelson, Pretty Boy Floyd, Ma Barker, not to mention the fictional ones, most notably Vito and Sonny Corleone,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

In an era that had witnessed the rise of celebrity outlaws, John Dillinger had been the most famous and flamboyant of them all. Gorn provides a riveting account of the period between 1933 and 1934, when the Dillinger gang robbed more than a dozen banks.

Synopsis:

A concise, engaging, and provocative history of African Americans since World War II, Peace Be Still is also nothing less than an alternate history of the United States in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Organizing this history around culture, politics, and resistance, Matthew C. Whitaker takes us from World War II as a galvanizing force for African American activism and the modern civil rights movement to the culmination of generations of struggle in the election of Barack Obama.

From the promise of the postand#8211;World War II era to the black power movement of the 1960s, the economic and political struggles of the 1970s, and the major ideological realignment of political culture during the 1980s, 1990s, and early 2000s, this book chronicles a people fighting oppression while fashioning a dynamic culture of artistic and religious expression along with a program of educational and professional advancement. A resurgence of rigid conservative right-wing policies, the politics of poverty, racial profiling, and police brutality are ongoing counterpoints to African Americans rising to political prominence and securing positions once denied them.

A history of African Americans for a new generation, Peace Be Still demonstrates how dramatically African American history illuminates the promise, conflicts, contradictions, hopes, and victories that all Americans share.

and#160;

About the Author

Elliott J. Gorn is Professor of History and American Studies at Brown University. He is the author of The Manly Art: Bare-Knuckle Prize Fighting in America and Mother Jones: The Most Dangerous Woman in America, among other books.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780195304831
Subtitle:
Modern Black America from World War II to Barack Obama
Author:
Gorn, Elliot
Author:
Gorn, Elliott J.
Author:
null, Elliott J.
Author:
Whitaker, Matthew C.
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Subject:
Criminals & Outlaws
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Criminals
Subject:
Middle west
Subject:
United States - 20th Century (1900-1945)
Subject:
Dillinger, John
Subject:
Criminals -- Middle West.
Subject:
History, American | 1900-1945
Subject:
African American Studies
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20140101
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
25 halftones
Pages:
412
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Biography » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » Americana » Fame and Infamy
History and Social Science » Crime » General
History and Social Science » Crime » Mobs and Organized Crime
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
Languages » ESL » General

Dillinger's Wild Ride: The Year That Made America's Public Enemy Number One Sale Hardcover
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Product details 412 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780195304831 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Gorn (Mother Jones) presents a solid, unromanticized account of the last year in the short life of famed bank robber John Dillinger. Gorn rejects psychologizing about why Dillinger, the unexceptional if restless grocer's son, born in Indianapolis in 1903, turned to a life of crime, arrested first in 1924 for assaulting an elderly store clerk in a botched robbery. After spending nine years — almost a third of his short life — in jail, Dillinger found a Depression-era America far different from the one he'd left. Less than two months into his parole, Dillinger and the first in a revolving parade of Dillinger gang members robbed the Commercial Bank in Daleville, Ind., making off with $3,500. Between July 1933 and his death just one year later, Dillinger robbed more than 10 banks, killed at least five people (all lawmen) and stole over $300,000, all the while evading capture by local law enforcement and later the FBI. Gorn, who teaches at Brown University, relies on newspaper accounts and government documents (and, thankfully, no reconstructed dialogue) to plot the movements of a criminal who, 75 years after his death, still reverberates in the American consciousness. 30 b&w photos. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , In an era that had witnessed the rise of celebrity outlaws, John Dillinger had been the most famous and flamboyant of them all. Gorn provides a riveting account of the period between 1933 and 1934, when the Dillinger gang robbed more than a dozen banks.
"Synopsis" by ,
A concise, engaging, and provocative history of African Americans since World War II, Peace Be Still is also nothing less than an alternate history of the United States in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Organizing this history around culture, politics, and resistance, Matthew C. Whitaker takes us from World War II as a galvanizing force for African American activism and the modern civil rights movement to the culmination of generations of struggle in the election of Barack Obama.

From the promise of the postand#8211;World War II era to the black power movement of the 1960s, the economic and political struggles of the 1970s, and the major ideological realignment of political culture during the 1980s, 1990s, and early 2000s, this book chronicles a people fighting oppression while fashioning a dynamic culture of artistic and religious expression along with a program of educational and professional advancement. A resurgence of rigid conservative right-wing policies, the politics of poverty, racial profiling, and police brutality are ongoing counterpoints to African Americans rising to political prominence and securing positions once denied them.

A history of African Americans for a new generation, Peace Be Still demonstrates how dramatically African American history illuminates the promise, conflicts, contradictions, hopes, and victories that all Americans share.

and#160;

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