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What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848 (Oxford History of the United States)

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What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848 (Oxford History of the United States) Cover

ISBN13: 9780195392432
ISBN10: 0195392434
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Oxford History of the United States is by far the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. In this prize-winning, critically acclaimed addition to the series, historian Daniel Walker Howe illuminates the period from the battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era when the United States expanded to the Pacific and won control over the richest part of the North American continent. Howe's panoramic narrative portrays revolutionary improvements in transportation and communications that accelerated the extension of the American empire. Railroads, canals, newspapers, and the telegraph dramatically lowered travel times and spurred the spread of information. These innovations prompted the emergence of mass political parties and stimulated America's economic development from an overwhelmingly rural country to a diversified economy in which commerce and industry took their place alongside agriculture. In his story, the author weaves together political and military events with social, economic, and cultural history. He examines the rise of Andrew Jackson and his Democratic party, but contends that John Quincy Adams and other Whigs--advocates of public education and economic integration, defenders of the rights of Indians, women, and African-Americans--were the true prophets of America's future. He reveals the power of religion to shape many aspects of American life during this period, including slavery and antislavery, women's rights and other reform movements, politics, education, and literature. Howe's story of American expansion culminates in the bitterly controversial but brilliantly executed war waged against Mexico to gain California and Texas for the United States.

Winner of the New-York Historical Society American History Book Prize

Finalist, 2007 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction

A masterpiece. A comprehensive, richly detailed, and elegantly written account of the republic between the War of 1812 and the American victory in Mexico a generation later.

--The Atlantic

Howe brings an impressive array of strengths to the daunting task of encapsulating these busy, complicated three-plus decades within a single (admittedly, very long) volume...he grasps the meaning as well as the details of developments and events. He has a fine eye for telling detail.... He is a genuine rarity...extraordinary.

--Washington Post Book World

A fascinating, richly detailed portrait of the U.S. as its very boundaries so dramatically and often violently shifted.... It is a rare thing to encounter a book so magisterial and judicious and also so compelling; it is a great achievement and deserves many readers beyond the academy.

--Chicago Tribune

This extraordinary contribution to the Oxford History of the United States series is a great accomplishment by one of the United States' most distinguished historians.. A book that every student of American history and politics should read. It is, in short, everything a work of historical scholarship should be.

--Foreign Affairs

Synopsis:

Historian Howe illuminates the period of American history from the battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era when the United States expands to the Pacific and wins control over the richest part of the North American continent.

Synopsis:

In this second volume of interviews conducted by Nebraska judge Eli S. Ricker, he focuses on white eyewitnesses and participants in the occupying and settling of the American West in the nineteenth century.

In the first decade of the twentieth century, as the Old West became increasingly distant and romanticized in popular consciousness, Eli S. Ricker (1842and#8211;1926) began interviewing those who had experienced it firsthand, hoping to write a multivolume series about its last days, centering on the conflicts between Natives and outsiders. For years Ricker traveled across the northern Plains, gathering information on and off reservations, in winter and in summer. Judge Ricker never wrote his book, but his interviews are priceless sources of information about that time and place, and they offer more balanced perspectives on events than were accepted at the time.

Richard E. Jensen brings together all of Rickerand#8217;s interviews with those men and women who came to the American West from elsewhereand#8212;settlers, homesteaders, and veterans. These interviews shed light on such key events as the massacre at Wounded Knee, the Little Bighorn battle, Beecher Island, Lightning Creek, the Mormon cow incident, and the Washita massacre. Also of interest are glimpses of everyday life at different agencies, including Pine Ridge, Yellow Medicine, and Fort Sill School; brief though revealing memoirs; and snapshots of cattle drives, conflicts with Natives, and the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad.

Synopsis:

The valuable interviews conducted by Nebraska judge Eli S. Ricker with Indian eyewitnesses to the Wounded Knee massacre, the Little Big Horn battle, the Grattan incident, and other events and personages of the Old West are finally made widely available in this long-awaited volume.

In the first decade of the twentieth century, as the Old West became increasingly distant and romanticized in popular consciousness, Eli S. Ricker (1843and#8211;1926) began interviewing those who had experienced it firsthand, hoping to write a multi-volume series about its last days. Among the many individuals he interviewed were American Indians, mostly Sioux, who spoke extensively about a range of subjects, some with the help of an interpreter. For years Ricker traveled across the northern Plains, determinedly gathering information on and off reservations, in winter and in summer. Judge Ricker never wrote his book, but his interviews are priceless sources of information about the Old West that offer more balanced perspectives on events than were accepted at the time.

Richard E. Jensen brings together all of Rickerand#8217;s interviews with American Indians, annotating the conversations and offering an extensive introduction that sets forth important information about Ricker, his research, and the editorial methodology guiding the present volume.

About the Author

Daniel Walker Howe is Rhodes Professor of American History Emeritus, Oxford University and Professor of History Emeritus, University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of The Political Culture of the American Whigs and Making the American Self: Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln. He lives in Los Angeles.

Table of Contents

Maps

Editor's Introduction

Abbreviations Used in Citations

Introduction

Prologue: The Defeat of the Past

1. The Continental Setting

2. From the Jaws of Defeat

3. An Era of Good and Bad Feelings

4. The World That Cotton Made

5. Awakenings of Religion

6. Overthrowing the Tyranny of Distance

7. The Improvers

8. Pursuing the Millennium

9. Andrew Jackson and His Age

10. Battles over Sovereignty

11. Jacksonian Democracy and the Rule of Law

12. Reason and Revelation

13. Jackson's Third Term

14. The New Economy

15. The Whigs and Their Age

16. American Renaissance

17. Texas, Tyler, and the Telegraph

18. Westward the Star of Empire

19. The War Against Mexico

20. The Revolutions of 1848

Finale: A Vision of the Future

Bibliographical Essay

Index

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

buckbooks, September 1, 2011 (view all comments by buckbooks)
One of the best entries in the Oxford series and the best U.S. history book I've read in a long time.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780195392432
Author:
Howe, Daniel Walker
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Author:
null, Daniel Walker
Author:
Ricker, Eli S.
Author:
Jensen, Richard E.
Subject:
United States - Antebellum Era
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
History, American | Early 19th Century
Subject:
US History-1800 to Civil War
Subject:
US History-19th Century
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Oxford History of the United States
Publication Date:
20090931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
47 halftones, 23 maps
Pages:
928
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848 (Oxford History of the United States) New Trade Paper
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Product details 928 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780195392432 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Historian Howe illuminates the period of American history from the battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era when the United States expands to the Pacific and wins control over the richest part of the North American continent.
"Synopsis" by ,
In this second volume of interviews conducted by Nebraska judge Eli S. Ricker, he focuses on white eyewitnesses and participants in the occupying and settling of the American West in the nineteenth century.

In the first decade of the twentieth century, as the Old West became increasingly distant and romanticized in popular consciousness, Eli S. Ricker (1842and#8211;1926) began interviewing those who had experienced it firsthand, hoping to write a multivolume series about its last days, centering on the conflicts between Natives and outsiders. For years Ricker traveled across the northern Plains, gathering information on and off reservations, in winter and in summer. Judge Ricker never wrote his book, but his interviews are priceless sources of information about that time and place, and they offer more balanced perspectives on events than were accepted at the time.

Richard E. Jensen brings together all of Rickerand#8217;s interviews with those men and women who came to the American West from elsewhereand#8212;settlers, homesteaders, and veterans. These interviews shed light on such key events as the massacre at Wounded Knee, the Little Bighorn battle, Beecher Island, Lightning Creek, the Mormon cow incident, and the Washita massacre. Also of interest are glimpses of everyday life at different agencies, including Pine Ridge, Yellow Medicine, and Fort Sill School; brief though revealing memoirs; and snapshots of cattle drives, conflicts with Natives, and the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad.

"Synopsis" by ,
The valuable interviews conducted by Nebraska judge Eli S. Ricker with Indian eyewitnesses to the Wounded Knee massacre, the Little Big Horn battle, the Grattan incident, and other events and personages of the Old West are finally made widely available in this long-awaited volume.

In the first decade of the twentieth century, as the Old West became increasingly distant and romanticized in popular consciousness, Eli S. Ricker (1843and#8211;1926) began interviewing those who had experienced it firsthand, hoping to write a multi-volume series about its last days. Among the many individuals he interviewed were American Indians, mostly Sioux, who spoke extensively about a range of subjects, some with the help of an interpreter. For years Ricker traveled across the northern Plains, determinedly gathering information on and off reservations, in winter and in summer. Judge Ricker never wrote his book, but his interviews are priceless sources of information about the Old West that offer more balanced perspectives on events than were accepted at the time.

Richard E. Jensen brings together all of Rickerand#8217;s interviews with American Indians, annotating the conversations and offering an extensive introduction that sets forth important information about Ricker, his research, and the editorial methodology guiding the present volume.

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