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Easeful Death: Is There a Case for Assisted Suicide

Easeful Death: Is There a Case for Assisted Suicide Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For decades assisted dying and euthanasia have sparked fierce public debate. The recent case of Terri Schiavo, and the firestorm of controversy it provoked, placed the issue in dramatic fashion before the American people once again, raising a host of complex legal, medical-ethical, religious, and individual liberties questions.

Now, in Easeful Death, Mary Warnock and Elisabeth Macdonald offer a clearly reasoned, even-handed assessment of arguments both for and against the legalization of assisted suicide and euthanasia. The authors take as their starting point the attempts in Britain and other countries to bring compassion into the rules governing the end of a patient's life. Drawing on the experience of the Netherlands, Belgium, and the state of Oregon in the US, where either assisted dying or euthanasia have been legalized, the authors explore the philosophical and ethical views on both sides of the debate, and examine how different legislative proposals would affect different members of society, from the very young to the very old. They describe the practical, medical processes of palliative care, self-denial of food and water, assisted dying and euthanasia, and ultimately conclude that the public is ready to embrace a more compassionate approach to assisted dying and that the dying themselves deserve a greater say in the timing and manner of their deaths.

Written with sensitivity, grace, and level-headed authority, Easeful Death is essential reading for caregivers, doctors, medical ethicists, and anyone concerned with their own or a loved one's end of life decisions. It argues persuasively that whatever the results of the legislative debate, compassion must be the guiding principle in the way we treat people who are dying or want to die.

Synopsis:

Written with sensitivity, grace, and even-handed authority, Easeful Death provides a clearly reasoned assessment of arguments both for and against the legalization of assisted suicide and euthanasia. Drawing on the experience of Britain, the Netherlands, Belgium, and the United States, the authors explore the philosophical and ethical views on both sides of the debate, and examine how different legislative proposals would affect different members of society, from the very young to the very old. They describe the practical, medical processes of palliative care, self-denial of food and water, assisted dying and euthanasia, and ultimately conclude that the public is ready to embrace a more compassionate approach to assisted dying and that the dying themselves deserve a greater say in the timing and manner of their deaths. Whatever the results of the legislative debate, compassion must be the guiding principle in the way we treat people who are dying or want to die.

New in Paperback

Synopsis:

Written with sensitivity, grace, and even-handed authority, Easeful Death provides a clearly reasoned assessment of arguments both for and against the legalization of assisted suicide and euthanasia. Drawing on the experience of Britain, the Netherlands, Belgium, and the United States, the authors explore the philosophical and ethical views on both sides of the debate, and examine how different legislative proposals would affect different members of society, from the very young to the very old. They describe the practical, medical processes of palliative care, self-denial of food and water, assisted dying and euthanasia, and ultimately conclude that the public is ready to embrace a more compassionate approach to assisted dying and that the dying themselves deserve a greater say in the timing and manner of their deaths. Whatever the results of the legislative debate, compassion must be the guiding principle in the way we treat people who are dying or want to die.

About the Author

Baroness Mary Warnock is a philosopher renowned for her writing on moral issues. Previously a Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at St Hugh's College, Oxford, and Mistress of Girton College, Cambridge, she is now an Independent Life Peer in the House of Lords, and a writer and broadcaster.

She was Chairman of the UK Committee of Inquiry into the Education of Children with Special Needs (report 1978); Chairman of the UK Committee of Inquiry into Human Fertility and Embryology (report 1984) and a Member of the House of Lords Select Committee on Euthanasia (1993). She is a Fellow of the British Academy, and Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh. Her numerous books include An Intelligent Person's Guide to Ethics (2004), and Making Babies: Is There a Right To Have Children?(2001).

Elisabeth Macdonald has spent her career working in cancer medicine in the UK as well as periods as a Consultant Oncologist in France and in research at Stanford University, California. In 1988 she was appointed a consultant Cancer Specialist at Guy's and St Thomas' Teaching Hospitals in London. Her wide clinical experience includes palliative care in the hospital setting.

She has an M.A. in Medical Law and Ethics from Kings College London and has taught medical ethics as an external tutor at Ethox, The Institute for Health Science in Oxford. She has retired from clinical practice and currently teaches Communication Skills to medical undergraduates at Guys Hospital. She also continues a medico-legal practice as an "Expert Witness". Her book on communication in medicine, Difficult Conversations in Medicine aimed at both medical students and patients, was published in 2004.

Table of Contents

1. The Fundamental Principles

2. Euthanasia is not all of one kind

3. A special case of the competent seeking to die

4. Non-voluntary euthanasia

5. Incompetent adults

6. The Sanctity of Life

7. The Slippery Slope

8. The specific objections of the medical professions

9. History and Philosophy

References

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199539901
Subtitle:
Is There a Case for Assisted Suicide
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Author:
Warnock, Mary
Author:
MacDonald, Elisabeth
Author:
null, Mary
Author:
null, Elisabeth
Subject:
Ethics
Subject:
Death
Subject:
Euthanasia
Subject:
Ethics & Moral Philosophy
Subject:
Nursing - Critical & Intensive care
Subject:
Medicine | Ethics
Publication Date:
20080511
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.00x5.46x.78 in. .64 lbs.

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Death and Dying

Easeful Death: Is There a Case for Assisted Suicide
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 224 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199539901 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Written with sensitivity, grace, and even-handed authority, Easeful Death provides a clearly reasoned assessment of arguments both for and against the legalization of assisted suicide and euthanasia. Drawing on the experience of Britain, the Netherlands, Belgium, and the United States, the authors explore the philosophical and ethical views on both sides of the debate, and examine how different legislative proposals would affect different members of society, from the very young to the very old. They describe the practical, medical processes of palliative care, self-denial of food and water, assisted dying and euthanasia, and ultimately conclude that the public is ready to embrace a more compassionate approach to assisted dying and that the dying themselves deserve a greater say in the timing and manner of their deaths. Whatever the results of the legislative debate, compassion must be the guiding principle in the way we treat people who are dying or want to die.

New in Paperback

"Synopsis" by , Written with sensitivity, grace, and even-handed authority, Easeful Death provides a clearly reasoned assessment of arguments both for and against the legalization of assisted suicide and euthanasia. Drawing on the experience of Britain, the Netherlands, Belgium, and the United States, the authors explore the philosophical and ethical views on both sides of the debate, and examine how different legislative proposals would affect different members of society, from the very young to the very old. They describe the practical, medical processes of palliative care, self-denial of food and water, assisted dying and euthanasia, and ultimately conclude that the public is ready to embrace a more compassionate approach to assisted dying and that the dying themselves deserve a greater say in the timing and manner of their deaths. Whatever the results of the legislative debate, compassion must be the guiding principle in the way we treat people who are dying or want to die.

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