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Barbarians and Brothers: Anglo-American Warfare, 1500-1865

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The most important conflicts in the founding of the English colonies and the American republic were fought against enemies either totally outside of their society or within it: barbarians or brothers. In this work, Wayne E. Lee presents a searching exploration of early modern English and American warfare, looking at the sixteenth-century wars in Ireland, the English Civil War, the colonial Anglo-Indian wars, the American Revolution, and the American Civil War.

Crucial to the level of violence in each of these conflicts was the perception of the enemy as either a brother (a fellow countryman) or a barbarian. But Lee goes beyond issues of ethnicity and race to explore how culture, strategy, and logistics also determined the nature of the fighting. Each conflict contributed to the development of American attitudes toward war. The brutal nature of English warfare in Ireland helped shape the military methods the English employed in North America, just as the legacy of the English Civil War cautioned American colonists about the need to restrain soldiers' behavior. Nonetheless, Anglo-Americans waged war against Indians with terrifying violence, in part because Native Americans' system of restraints on warfare diverged from European traditions. The Americans then struggled during the Revolution to reconcile these two different trends of restraint and violence when fighting various enemies.

Through compelling campaign narratives, Lee explores the lives and fears of soldiers, as well as the strategies of their commanders, while showing how their collective choices determined the nature of wartime violence. In the end, the repeated experience of wars with barbarians or brothers created an American culture of war that demanded absolute solutions: enemies were either to be incorporated or rejected. And that determination played a major role in defining the violence used against them.

Synopsis:

The most important conflicts in the founding of the English colonies and the American republic were fought against enemies either totally outside of their society or within it: barbarians or brothers. In Barbarians and Brothers, historian Wayne Lee presents a searching exploration of early modern English and American warfare, looking at such conflicts as the sixteenth-century wars in Ireland, the English Civil War, the colonial Anglo-Indian wars, the American Revolution, and the American Civil War. Lee discusses these conflicts through compelling campaign narratives, exploring the lives and fears of soldiers as well as the strategies of their commanders, while showing how their collective choices determined the nature of wartime violence. In the end, the repeated experience of wars with barbarians or brothers created an American culture of war that demands absolute solutions: enemies are either to be incorporated or rejected, included or excluded. And that determination plays a major role in defining the violence used against them. Even within such absolute goals, however, Lee points to the ways that war continued to be defined by both violence and restraint. He offers a multi-faceted account of three centuries of Anglo-American warfare, revealing how a variety of factors either fueled or curbed the violence directed towards an enemy.

Synopsis:

Barbarians and Brothers presents a searching re-examination of early modern English and American warfare. It reminds that the most important conflicts in the creation of the American republic were fought either with enemies within society or enemies totally outside of it: brothers or barbarians. Those conflicts, against the Irish in the 1500s, the English Civil War, the colonial Anglo-Indian wars, the American Revolution, and the American Civil War, defined the American experience of war as one consistently framed by the problem of inclusion or exclusion, and seemingly demanding of absolute solutions. Who should be subjects or citizens? Who should be excluded, and what forms of violence should be used against them? Lee tells these stories through compelling campaign narratives, exploring the lives and fears of soldiers as well as the strategies and logistical systems of their commanders. Sensitive to the complexities of inter-cultural conflict, Lee also provides a full re-interpretation of Native American warfare and how their systems of restraint in war failed to integrate with those developed in England. Built around the variables of capacity, control, calculation, and culture, Barbarians and Brothers provides a comprehensive look at how choices are made in war, by soldiers and by generals, and how those choices determine the nature of atrocity and of restraint. In the end, the American experience of wars with barbarians and brothers has created an American culture of war that demands absolute solutions. That absolutist vision of warfare fits poorly with the modern world's problems and the modern world's technological capacity to destroy.

About the Author

Wayne E. Lee is Associate Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Lee served in the U.S. Army from 1987 to 1992.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Notes on Style

Introduction

Part 1: Barbarians and Subjects: The Perfect Storm of Wartime Violence in Sixteenth-Century Ireland

1. Sir Henry Sidney and the Mutiny at Clonmel, 1569

2. The Earls of Essex, 1575 and 1599

Part 2: Codes, Military Culture, and Clubmen in the English Civil War

3. Sir William Waller, 1644

4. The Clubmen, 1645

Part 3: Peace Chiefs and Blood Revenge: Native American Warfare

5. Wingina, Ralph Lane, and the Roanoke Colony of 1586

6. Old Brims and Chipacasi, 1725

Part 4: Gentility and Atrocity: The Continental Army and the American Revolution

7. "One Bold Stroke": Washington in Pennsylvania, 1777-78

8. "Malice Enough in Our Hearts": Sullivan and the Iroquois, 1779

Conclusion: Limited War and Hard War in the American Civil War

Abbreviations

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199737918
Author:
Lee, Wayne E
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Author:
Lee, Wayne E.
Author:
null, Wayne E.
Subject:
Military - Other
Subject:
History, Other | Military History
Subject:
Military-General History
Subject:
United States / Revolutionary Period (1775-1800)
Publication Date:
20110431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 illus.
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
6.5 x 9.4 x 1.3 in 1.3 lb

Related Subjects

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History and Social Science » Military » General History
History and Social Science » US History » Colonial America
History and Social Science » World History » England » General

Barbarians and Brothers: Anglo-American Warfare, 1500-1865 Sale Hardcover
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Product details 352 pages Oxford University Press - English 9780199737918 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The most important conflicts in the founding of the English colonies and the American republic were fought against enemies either totally outside of their society or within it: barbarians or brothers. In Barbarians and Brothers, historian Wayne Lee presents a searching exploration of early modern English and American warfare, looking at such conflicts as the sixteenth-century wars in Ireland, the English Civil War, the colonial Anglo-Indian wars, the American Revolution, and the American Civil War. Lee discusses these conflicts through compelling campaign narratives, exploring the lives and fears of soldiers as well as the strategies of their commanders, while showing how their collective choices determined the nature of wartime violence. In the end, the repeated experience of wars with barbarians or brothers created an American culture of war that demands absolute solutions: enemies are either to be incorporated or rejected, included or excluded. And that determination plays a major role in defining the violence used against them. Even within such absolute goals, however, Lee points to the ways that war continued to be defined by both violence and restraint. He offers a multi-faceted account of three centuries of Anglo-American warfare, revealing how a variety of factors either fueled or curbed the violence directed towards an enemy.
"Synopsis" by , Barbarians and Brothers presents a searching re-examination of early modern English and American warfare. It reminds that the most important conflicts in the creation of the American republic were fought either with enemies within society or enemies totally outside of it: brothers or barbarians. Those conflicts, against the Irish in the 1500s, the English Civil War, the colonial Anglo-Indian wars, the American Revolution, and the American Civil War, defined the American experience of war as one consistently framed by the problem of inclusion or exclusion, and seemingly demanding of absolute solutions. Who should be subjects or citizens? Who should be excluded, and what forms of violence should be used against them? Lee tells these stories through compelling campaign narratives, exploring the lives and fears of soldiers as well as the strategies and logistical systems of their commanders. Sensitive to the complexities of inter-cultural conflict, Lee also provides a full re-interpretation of Native American warfare and how their systems of restraint in war failed to integrate with those developed in England. Built around the variables of capacity, control, calculation, and culture, Barbarians and Brothers provides a comprehensive look at how choices are made in war, by soldiers and by generals, and how those choices determine the nature of atrocity and of restraint. In the end, the American experience of wars with barbarians and brothers has created an American culture of war that demands absolute solutions. That absolutist vision of warfare fits poorly with the modern world's problems and the modern world's technological capacity to destroy.
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