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The Real North Korea: Life and Politics in the Failed Stalinist Utopia

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The Real North Korea: Life and Politics in the Failed Stalinist Utopia Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Andrei Lankov has gone where few outsiders have ever been. A native of the former Soviet Union, he lived as an exchange student in North Korea in the 1980s. He has studied it for his entire career, using his fluency in Korean and personal contacts to build a rich, nuanced understanding.

In The Real North Korea, Lankov substitutes cold, clear analysis for the overheated rhetoric surrounding this opaque police state. After providing an accessible history of the nation, he turns his focus to what North Korea is, what its leadership thinks, and how its people cope with living in such an oppressive and poor place. He argues that North Korea is not irrational, and nothing shows this better than its continuing survival against all odds. A living political fossil, it clings to existence in the face of limited resources and a zombie economy, manipulating great powers despite its weakness. Its leaders are not ideological zealots or madmen, but perhaps the best practitioners of Machiavellian politics that can be found in the modern world. Even though they preside over a failed state, they have successfully used diplomacy-including nuclear threats-to extract support from other nations. But while the people in charge have been ruthless and successful in holding on to power, Lankov goes on to argue that this cannot continue forever, since the old system is slowly falling apart. In the long run, with or without reform, the regime is unsustainable. Lankov contends that reforms, if attempted, will trigger a dramatic implosion of the regime. They will not prolong its existence.

Based on vast expertise, this book reveals how average North Koreans live, how their leaders rule, and how both survive.

Review:

"Not crazy, but crafty and cornered is the verdict of this probing, clear-eyed study of the world's most irascible dictatorship. Lankov (From Stalin to Kim Il Sung), a historian at Seoul's Koomkin University, traces the entrenchment of North Korea's uniquely totalitarian brand of communism, with its backward and inefficient state-run economy, all-encompassing police state, hostility to outside influences, and hysterical worship of despot Kim Il-Sung and his descendants. Yet he discerns an underlying rationality to the regime, especially as its economy has reverted to illegal private markets after the crisis and famine of the 1990s. North Korea's leaders, he argues, cannot undertake Chinese-style capitalist reforms for fear that opening the system would lead to their overthrow and reunification with South Korea; their only option, he contends, is to continue using nuclear threats and Machiavellian diplomacy to extort foreign aid to prop up the regime. Drawing on his experiences living in the country and extensive contacts with North Korean exiles, Lankov's perceptive account registers the country's dysfunctions, and the adaptations ordinary people make to ease them. Lankov's is one of the best and most accessible recent accounts of this seemingly outlandish nation, and the book eschews North Korea's lurid stereotypes to reveal a stunted normalcy. Agent: Andy Ross, the Andy Ross Agency." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

North Korea is widely regarded as one of the most repressive and dangerous nations in the world--the last Stalinist regime on earth. Yet despite its manifest importance--particularly its potential for destabilizing East Asia--North Korea is notoriously one of the most difficult regimes in the world to study. A black box to most, the regime appears to be fundamentally irrational and unstable. How can it survive? In A Country, Not a Bomb, Andrei Lankov draws from years of research and his own access to North Koreans to provide a genuinely informed and accessible overview of North Korea, from its origins in 1945 to the present. Given its confrontational foreign policy, its nuclear ambitions, and its paranoid leadership cadre, this incredibly poor nation has remained on the front pages ever since the end of the Cold War. Lankov, who is fluent in both Korean and English, will explain how the regime actually functions and why it has achieved a modicum of stability despite its bizarre mix of Stalinist totalitarianism and hereditary monarchy. Along with covering North Korea's foreign and nuclear policies, the book will also explain how its ruling class actually rules and how ordinary North Koreans live. Perhaps most surprisingly, a grass roots market society is emerging, and Lankov traces how this has happened. Lankov has conducted many interviews with North Korean emigres, so his understanding of both the regime and life under it is remarkably well informed. It will be the definitive account.

About the Author

Andrei Lankov is Professor of History, Koomkin University (Seoul). He was born in 1963, in Leningrad in what was then the Soviet Union. He also has studied in North Korea as an exchange student. Then he taught at universities in Russia and Australia, and was Associate Professor at Australia National University (ANU) before moving to Seoul where he now lives with his family.

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

Part 1. THE SOCIETY KIM IL SUNG BUILT AND HOW HE DID IT

Part 2: TWO DECADES OF CRISIS

Part 3. THE LOGIC OF SURVIVAL (DOMESTICALLY)

Part 4. THE SURVIVAL DIPLOMACY

Part 5. WHAT TO DO ABOUT THE NORTH?

Part 6. BEING READY FOR WHAT WE WISH FOR

CONCLUSION

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199964291
Author:
Lankov, Andrei
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Subject:
General Political Science
Subject:
Politics | Comparative Politics | Asia
Subject:
Politics | International Studies
Publication Date:
20130431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
6.5 x 9.3 x 1.1 in 1.25 lb

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
History and Social Science » Asia » Korea
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » International Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » World History » Asia » General
History and Social Science » World History » Korea
Science and Mathematics » Biology » General

The Real North Korea: Life and Politics in the Failed Stalinist Utopia Used Hardcover
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Product details 304 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199964291 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Not crazy, but crafty and cornered is the verdict of this probing, clear-eyed study of the world's most irascible dictatorship. Lankov (From Stalin to Kim Il Sung), a historian at Seoul's Koomkin University, traces the entrenchment of North Korea's uniquely totalitarian brand of communism, with its backward and inefficient state-run economy, all-encompassing police state, hostility to outside influences, and hysterical worship of despot Kim Il-Sung and his descendants. Yet he discerns an underlying rationality to the regime, especially as its economy has reverted to illegal private markets after the crisis and famine of the 1990s. North Korea's leaders, he argues, cannot undertake Chinese-style capitalist reforms for fear that opening the system would lead to their overthrow and reunification with South Korea; their only option, he contends, is to continue using nuclear threats and Machiavellian diplomacy to extort foreign aid to prop up the regime. Drawing on his experiences living in the country and extensive contacts with North Korean exiles, Lankov's perceptive account registers the country's dysfunctions, and the adaptations ordinary people make to ease them. Lankov's is one of the best and most accessible recent accounts of this seemingly outlandish nation, and the book eschews North Korea's lurid stereotypes to reveal a stunted normalcy. Agent: Andy Ross, the Andy Ross Agency." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , North Korea is widely regarded as one of the most repressive and dangerous nations in the world--the last Stalinist regime on earth. Yet despite its manifest importance--particularly its potential for destabilizing East Asia--North Korea is notoriously one of the most difficult regimes in the world to study. A black box to most, the regime appears to be fundamentally irrational and unstable. How can it survive? In A Country, Not a Bomb, Andrei Lankov draws from years of research and his own access to North Koreans to provide a genuinely informed and accessible overview of North Korea, from its origins in 1945 to the present. Given its confrontational foreign policy, its nuclear ambitions, and its paranoid leadership cadre, this incredibly poor nation has remained on the front pages ever since the end of the Cold War. Lankov, who is fluent in both Korean and English, will explain how the regime actually functions and why it has achieved a modicum of stability despite its bizarre mix of Stalinist totalitarianism and hereditary monarchy. Along with covering North Korea's foreign and nuclear policies, the book will also explain how its ruling class actually rules and how ordinary North Koreans live. Perhaps most surprisingly, a grass roots market society is emerging, and Lankov traces how this has happened. Lankov has conducted many interviews with North Korean emigres, so his understanding of both the regime and life under it is remarkably well informed. It will be the definitive account.
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