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1 Burnside Geography- Mapping and Cartography

Maps: Finding Our Place in the World

by and

Maps: Finding Our Place in the World Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:


Maps are universal forms of communication, easily understood and appreciated regardless of culture or language. This truly magisterial book introduces readers to the widest range of maps ever considered in one volume: maps from different time periods and a variety of cultures; maps made for divergent purposes and depicting a range of environments; and maps that embody the famous, the important, the beautiful, the groundbreaking, or the amusing. Built around the functions of maps (the kinds of things maps do and have done) i>Maps confirms the vital role of maps throughout history in commerce, art, literature, and national identity.

The book begins by examining the use of maps for wayfinding, revealing that even maps as common and widely used as these are the product of historical circumstances and cultural differences. The second chapter considers maps whose makers employed the smallest of scales to envision the broadest of human stages: the world, the heavens, even the act of creation itself. The next chapter looks at maps that are, literally, at the opposite end of the scale from cosmological and world maps; maps that represent specific parts of the world and provide a close-up view of areas in which their makers lived, worked, and moved.

Having shown how maps help us get around and make sense of our greater and lesser worlds, Maps then turns to the ways in which certain maps can be linked to particular events in history, exploring how they have helped Americans, for instance, to understand their past, cope with current events, and plan their national future. The fifth chapter considers maps that represent data from scientific instruments, population censuses, and historical records. These maps illustrate, for example, how diseases spread, what the ocean floor looks like, and how the weather is tracked and predicted. Next comes a turn to the imaginary, featuring maps that depict entire fictional worlds, from Hell to Utopia and from Middle Earth to the fantasy game World of Warcraft. The final chapter traces the origins of map consumption throughout history and ponders the impact of cartography on modern society.

A companion volume to the most ambitious exhibition on the history of maps ever mounted in North America, Maps will challenge readers to stretch conventional thought about what constitutes a map and how many different ways we can understand graphically the environment in which we live. Collectors, historians, mapmakers and users, and anyone who has ever “gotten lost” in the lines and symbols of a map will find much to love and learn from in this book.

Synopsis:

We often look to mapmakers in history to be the sober artists, creating tools of conquest and commerce.and#160; But every once in a while, thankfully, humor has infused, leaving a legacy of cartographic curiosities.and#160; There have been maps crafted of sushi and sashimi, maps in the shapes of animals, an olfactory map of Newport, Rhode Island, etc.and#160; And these maps have an avid fan base--with blogs dedicated to Strange Maps, for example.and#160;

This collection is a curation of cartographic curiosities from the British Library collections. The author has unearthed an array of the curious and whimsical, from game maps to maps in human form, to political, moral and religious maps.and#160; The selection is, at times, as idiosyncratic, or personal, as the curious maps themselves. And it is accompanied by discursive captions as well as an introduction that identifies some key themes of map production, curious styles, and the commerce and collection of curious maps.

Synopsis:

Since that ancient day when the first human drew a line connecting Point A to Point B, maps have been understood as one of the most essential tools of communication. Despite differences in language, appearance, or culture, maps are universal touchstones in human civilization.

and#160;

Over the centuries, maps have served many varied purposes; far from mere guides for reaching a destination, they are unique artistic forms, aides in planning commercial routes, literary devices for illuminating a story. Accuracyandmdash;or inaccuracyandmdash;of maps has been the make-or-break factor in countless military battles throughout history. They have graced the walls of homes, bringing prestige and elegance to their owners. They track the mountains, oceans, and stars of our existence. Maps help us make sense of our worlds both real and imaginaryandmdash;they bring order to the seeming chaos of our surroundings.

and#160;

With The Curious Map Book, Ashley Baynton-Williams gathers an amazing, chronologically ordered variety of cartographic gems, mainly from the vast collection of the British Library. He has unearthed a wide array of the whimsical and fantastic, from maps of board games to political ones, maps of the Holy Land to maps of the human soul. In his illuminating introduction, Baynton-Williams also identifies and expounds upon key themes of map production, peculiar styles, and the commerce and collection of unique maps. This incredible volume offers a wealth of gorgeous illustrations for anyone who is cartographically curious.and#160;

Synopsis:

The twentieth century was a golden age of mapmaking, an era of cartographic boom. Maps proliferated and permeated almost every aspect of daily life, not only chronicling geography and history but also charting and conveying myriad political and social agendas. Here Tim Bryars and Tom Harper select one hundred maps from the millions printed, drawn, or otherwise constructed during the twentieth century and recount through them a narrative of the centuryand#8217;s key events and developments.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

As Bryars and Harper reveal, maps make ideal narrators, and the maps in this book tell the story of the 1900sand#151;which saw two world wars, the Great Depression, the Swinging Sixties, the Cold War, feminism, leisure, and the Internet. Several of the maps have already gained recognition for their historical significanceand#151;for example, Harry Beckand#8217;s iconic London Underground mapand#151;but the majority of maps on these pages have rarely, if ever, been seen in print since they first appeared. There are maps that were printed on handkerchiefs and on the endpapers of books; maps that were used in advertising or propaganda; maps that were strictly official and those that were entirely commercial; maps that were printed by the thousand, and highly specialist maps issued in editions of just a few dozen; maps that were envisaged as permanent keepsakes of major events, and maps that were relevant for a matter of hours or days.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

As much a pleasure to view as it is to read, A History of the Twentieth Century in 100 Maps celebrates the visual variety of twentieth century maps and the hilarious, shocking, or poignant narratives of the individuals and institutions caught up in their production and use.

About the Author

James R. Akerman is director of the Newberry Libraryand#8217;s Hermon Dunlap Smith Center for the History of Cartography and editor of Cartographies of Travel and Navigation, also published by the University of Chicago Press. Robert W. Karrow Jr. is curator of special collections and maps in the Roger and Julie Baskes Department of Special Collections at the Newberry Library.

Table of Contents

Foreword

and#160;

Introduction, Robert W. Karrow Jr.

and#160;

Chapter 1: Finding Our Way, James R. Akerman

and#160;

Chapter 2: Mapping the World, Denis Cosgrove

and#160;

Chapter 3: Mapping Parts of the World, Matthew H. Edney

and#160;

Chapter 4: Mapping American History, Susan Schulten

and#160;

Chapter 5: Visualizing Nature and Society, Michael Friendly and Gilles Palsky

and#160;

Chapter 6: Mapping Imaginary Worlds, Ricardo Padrand#243;n

and#160;

Chapter 7: Consuming Maps, Diane Dillon

and#160;

References and Selected Bibliography

List of Contributors

Acknowledgments

List of Illustrations

Illustration Credits

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226010755
Subtitle:
Finding Our Place in the World
Author:
James R. Akerman and Robert W. Karrow Jr.
Foreword by:
McCarter, John
Foreword:
McCarter, John
Editor:
Karrow, Robert W., Jr. JR.
Editor:
Akerman, James R.
Editor:
Karrow, Robert W., Jr. JR. JR.
Editor:
Akerman, James R.; Karrow, Robert W.
Editor:
Karrow, Robert W., Jr. JR. JR. JR.
Editor:
Akerman, James R.; Karrow, Jr., Robert W.
Editor:
Karrow, Robert W., Jr.
Editor:
Karrow, Robert W., Jr. JR. JR. JR. JR.
Editor:
Karrow, Robert W., Jr. JR. JR. JR. JR. J
Editor:
Akerman, James
Author:
Harper, Tom
Author:
Akerman, James R.
Author:
Bryars, Tim
Author:
Baynton-Williams, Ashley
Author:
Karrow, Robert W.
Author:
Akerman, James
Author:
McCarter, John
Publisher:
University Of Chicago Press
Subject:
Geography
Subject:
Maps
Subject:
History
Subject:
Cartography
Subject:
Earth Sciences - Geography
Subject:
Cartography -- History.
Subject:
Civil Engineering-Cartography
Subject:
General History
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
November 2007
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
198 color plates
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
11 x 8.5 in

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Related Subjects

Engineering » Civil Engineering » Cartography
Engineering » Engineering » History
History and Social Science » Geography » General
History and Social Science » Geography » Mapping and Cartography
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics

Maps: Finding Our Place in the World Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$35.00 In Stock
Product details 336 pages University Of Chicago Press - English 9780226010755 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
We often look to mapmakers in history to be the sober artists, creating tools of conquest and commerce.and#160; But every once in a while, thankfully, humor has infused, leaving a legacy of cartographic curiosities.and#160; There have been maps crafted of sushi and sashimi, maps in the shapes of animals, an olfactory map of Newport, Rhode Island, etc.and#160; And these maps have an avid fan base--with blogs dedicated to Strange Maps, for example.and#160;

This collection is a curation of cartographic curiosities from the British Library collections. The author has unearthed an array of the curious and whimsical, from game maps to maps in human form, to political, moral and religious maps.and#160; The selection is, at times, as idiosyncratic, or personal, as the curious maps themselves. And it is accompanied by discursive captions as well as an introduction that identifies some key themes of map production, curious styles, and the commerce and collection of curious maps.

"Synopsis" by ,
Since that ancient day when the first human drew a line connecting Point A to Point B, maps have been understood as one of the most essential tools of communication. Despite differences in language, appearance, or culture, maps are universal touchstones in human civilization.

and#160;

Over the centuries, maps have served many varied purposes; far from mere guides for reaching a destination, they are unique artistic forms, aides in planning commercial routes, literary devices for illuminating a story. Accuracyandmdash;or inaccuracyandmdash;of maps has been the make-or-break factor in countless military battles throughout history. They have graced the walls of homes, bringing prestige and elegance to their owners. They track the mountains, oceans, and stars of our existence. Maps help us make sense of our worlds both real and imaginaryandmdash;they bring order to the seeming chaos of our surroundings.

and#160;

With The Curious Map Book, Ashley Baynton-Williams gathers an amazing, chronologically ordered variety of cartographic gems, mainly from the vast collection of the British Library. He has unearthed a wide array of the whimsical and fantastic, from maps of board games to political ones, maps of the Holy Land to maps of the human soul. In his illuminating introduction, Baynton-Williams also identifies and expounds upon key themes of map production, peculiar styles, and the commerce and collection of unique maps. This incredible volume offers a wealth of gorgeous illustrations for anyone who is cartographically curious.and#160;

"Synopsis" by ,
The twentieth century was a golden age of mapmaking, an era of cartographic boom. Maps proliferated and permeated almost every aspect of daily life, not only chronicling geography and history but also charting and conveying myriad political and social agendas. Here Tim Bryars and Tom Harper select one hundred maps from the millions printed, drawn, or otherwise constructed during the twentieth century and recount through them a narrative of the centuryand#8217;s key events and developments.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

As Bryars and Harper reveal, maps make ideal narrators, and the maps in this book tell the story of the 1900sand#151;which saw two world wars, the Great Depression, the Swinging Sixties, the Cold War, feminism, leisure, and the Internet. Several of the maps have already gained recognition for their historical significanceand#151;for example, Harry Beckand#8217;s iconic London Underground mapand#151;but the majority of maps on these pages have rarely, if ever, been seen in print since they first appeared. There are maps that were printed on handkerchiefs and on the endpapers of books; maps that were used in advertising or propaganda; maps that were strictly official and those that were entirely commercial; maps that were printed by the thousand, and highly specialist maps issued in editions of just a few dozen; maps that were envisaged as permanent keepsakes of major events, and maps that were relevant for a matter of hours or days.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

As much a pleasure to view as it is to read, A History of the Twentieth Century in 100 Maps celebrates the visual variety of twentieth century maps and the hilarious, shocking, or poignant narratives of the individuals and institutions caught up in their production and use.

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