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Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
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    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

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1 Burnside - Bldg. 2 Geography- Mapping and Cartography
1 Remote Warehouse Civil Engineering- Cartography
25 Remote Warehouse Science Reference- Technology

This title in other editions

No Dig, No Fly, No Go: How Maps Restrict and Control

by

No Dig, No Fly, No Go: How Maps Restrict and Control Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Some maps help us find our way; others restrict where we go and what we do. These maps control behavior, regulating activities from flying to fishing, prohibiting students from one part of town from being schooled on the other, and banishing certain individuals and industries to the periphery. This restrictive cartography has boomed in recent decades as governments seek regulate activities as diverse as hiking, building a residence, opening a store, locating a chemical plant, or painting your house anything but regulation colors. It is this aspect of mapping—its power to prohibit—that celebrated geographer Mark Monmonier tackles in No Dig, No Fly, No Go.

Rooted in ancient Egypts need to reestablish property boundaries following the annual retreat of the Niles floodwaters, restrictive mapping has been indispensable in settling the American West, claiming slices of Antarctica, protecting fragile ocean fisheries, and keeping sex offenders away from playgrounds. But it has also been used for opprobrium: during one of the darkest moments in American history, cartographic exclusion orders helped send thousands of Japanese Americans to remote detention camps. Tracing the power of prohibitive mapping at multiple levels—from regional to international—and multiple dimensions—from property to cyberspace—Monmonier demonstrates how much boundaries influence our experience—from homeownership and voting to taxation and airline travel. A worthy successor to his critically acclaimed How to Lie with Maps, the book is replete with all of the hallmarks of a Monmonier classic, including the wry observations and witty humor.

In the end, Monmonier looks far beyond the lines on the page to observe that mapped boundaries, however persuasive their appearance, are not always as permanent and impermeable as their cartographic lines might suggest. Written for anyone who votes, owns a home, or aspires to be an informed citizen, No Dig, No Fly. No Go will change the way we look at maps forever.

Synopsis:

For more than thirty years, the History of Cartography Project has charted the course for scholarship on cartography, bringing together research from a variety of disciplines on the creation, dissemination, and use of maps. Volume 6, Cartography in the Twentieth Century, continues this tradition with a groundbreaking survey of the century just ended and a new full-color, encyclopedic format.

The twentieth century is a pivotal period in map history. The transition from paper to digital formats led to previously unimaginable dynamic and interactive maps. Geographic information systems radically altered cartographic institutions and reduced the skill required to create maps.  Satellite positioning and mobile communications revolutionized wayfinding.  Mapping evolved as an important tool for coping with complexity, organizing knowledge, and influencing public opinion in all parts of the globe and at all levels of society. Volume 6 covers these changes comprehensively, while thoroughly demonstrating the far-reaching effects of maps on science, technology, and society—and vice versa. 

The lavishly produced volume includes more than five hundred articles accompanied by more than a thousand images. Hundreds of expert contributors provide both original research, often based on their own participation in the developments they describe, and interpretations of larger trends in cartography. Designed for use by both scholars and the general public, this definitive volume is a reference work of first resort for all who study and love maps.

About the Author

Mark Monmonier is Distinguished Professor of Geography at Syracuse Universitys Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. He is the author of more than a dozen books, including How to Lie with Maps; Coast Lines: How Mapmakers Frame the World and Chart Environmental Change; and No Dig, No Fly, No Go: How Maps Restrict and Control, all from the University of Chicago Press.

Table of Contents

Preface  and Acknowledgments

1 Introduction: Boundaries Matter

2 Keep Off!

3 Keep Out!

4 Absentee Landlords

5 Dividing the Sea

6 Divide and Govern

7 Contorted Boundaries, Wasted Votes

8 Redlining and Greenlining

9 Growth Management

10 Vice Squad

11 No Dig, No Fly, No Go

12 Electronic Boundaries

Notes

Selected Readings for Further Exploration

Sources of Illustrations

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226534688
Author:
Monmonier, Mark
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Author:
Monmonier, Mark S.
Author:
Monmonier, Mark
Subject:
Cartography - Political aspects
Subject:
Cartography - Social aspects
Subject:
General
Subject:
Earth Sciences - Geography
Subject:
Social aspects
Subject:
Cartography
Subject:
Geography
Subject:
Science Reference-Technology
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series:
The History of Cartography
Publication Date:
20100531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
63 halftones, 19 line drawings
Pages:
1728
Dimensions:
11 x 8.5 in

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Related Subjects

Engineering » Civil Engineering » Cartography
History and Social Science » Geography » General
History and Social Science » Geography » Mapping and Cartography
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Reference » Science Reference » Technology

No Dig, No Fly, No Go: How Maps Restrict and Control New Trade Paper
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Product details 1728 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226534688 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
For more than thirty years, the History of Cartography Project has charted the course for scholarship on cartography, bringing together research from a variety of disciplines on the creation, dissemination, and use of maps. Volume 6, Cartography in the Twentieth Century, continues this tradition with a groundbreaking survey of the century just ended and a new full-color, encyclopedic format.

The twentieth century is a pivotal period in map history. The transition from paper to digital formats led to previously unimaginable dynamic and interactive maps. Geographic information systems radically altered cartographic institutions and reduced the skill required to create maps.  Satellite positioning and mobile communications revolutionized wayfinding.  Mapping evolved as an important tool for coping with complexity, organizing knowledge, and influencing public opinion in all parts of the globe and at all levels of society. Volume 6 covers these changes comprehensively, while thoroughly demonstrating the far-reaching effects of maps on science, technology, and society—and vice versa. 

The lavishly produced volume includes more than five hundred articles accompanied by more than a thousand images. Hundreds of expert contributors provide both original research, often based on their own participation in the developments they describe, and interpretations of larger trends in cartography. Designed for use by both scholars and the general public, this definitive volume is a reference work of first resort for all who study and love maps.

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