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Other titles in the Historical Studies of Urban America series:

Modern Housing for America: Policy Struggles in the New Deal Era (Historical Studies of Urban America)

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Modern Housing for America: Policy Struggles in the New Deal Era (Historical Studies of Urban America) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the late nineteenth century, public officials throughout the United States began to experiment with new methods of managing their local economies and meeting the infrastructure needs of a newly urban, industrial nation.and#160;Stymied by legal and financial barriers, they created a new class of quasi-public agencies called public authorities. Today these entities operate at all levels of government, and range from tiny operations like the Springfield Parking Authority in Massachusetts, which runs thirteen parking lots and garages, to mammoth enterprises like the Tennessee Valley Authority, with nearly twelve billion dollars in revenues each year.
and#160;
Inand#160;The Rise of the Public Authority, Gail Radford recounts the history of these inscrutable agencies, examining how and why they were established, the varied forms they have taken, and how these pervasive but elusive mechanisms have molded our economy and politics over the past hundred years.
and#160;

Synopsis:

The basic shape of federal policy in housing as in many other areas was determined during the New Deal, but not without conflict among movements and intellectuals advocating alternative directions. While modern housing ideas failed to define the long-term thrust of federal policy, they did influence a short-lived program of the Public Works Administration, as Radford shows in case studies of the highly acclaimed Carl Mackley Houses of Philadelphia and Harlem River Houses of New York.

Synopsis:

In an era when many decry the failures of federal housing programs, this book introduces us to appealing but largely forgotten alternatives that existed when federal policies were first defined in the New Deal. Led by Catherine Bauer, supporters of the modern housing initiative argued that government should emphasize non-commercial development of imaginatively designed compact neighborhoods with extensive parks and social services. The book explores the question of how Americans might have responded to this option through case studies of experimental developments in Philadelphia and New York. While defeated during the 1930s, modern housing ideas suggest a variety of design and financial strategies that could contribute to solving the housing problems of our own time.

Synopsis:

In an era when many decry the failures of federal housing programs, this book introduces us to appealing but largely forgotten alternatives that existed when federal policies were first defined in the New Deal. Led by Catherine Bauer, supporters of the modern housing initiative argued that government should emphasize non-commercial development of imaginatively designed compact neighborhoods with extensive parks and social services. The book explores the question of how Americans might have responded to this option through case studies of experimental developments in Philadelphia and New York. While defeated during the 1930s, modern housing ideas suggest a variety of design and financial strategies that could contribute to solving the housing problems of our own time.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 211-258) and index.

About the Author

Gail Radford isand#160;associate professor of history at the University at Buffalo.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1: American Housing before the Depression

2: The Politics of Housing in the 1920s

3: Catherine Bauer and the Plan for "Modern Housing"

4: The PWA Housing Division

5: The Hosiery Workers' Model Development

6: The Harlem River Houses

7: The Struggle to Shape Permanent Policy

Conclusion

Notes

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226702230
Author:
Radford, Gail
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Location:
Chicago :
Subject:
History
Subject:
U.S. Government
Subject:
Architecture
Subject:
City Planning & Urban Development
Subject:
Public Policy
Subject:
Housing
Subject:
Housing policy
Subject:
New deal, 1933-1939
Subject:
New Deal, 19
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
Political Policy - City Planning & Urban Dev.
Subject:
Public Policy - General
Subject:
Public Policy - City Planning & Urban Dev.
Subject:
Housing policy -- United States -- History.
Subject:
Politics - General
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Copyright:
Edition Description:
1
Series:
Historical Studies of Urban America
Series Volume:
12
Publication Date:
19970131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
24 halftones
Pages:
232
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Cityscape
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Urban Planning
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » American Studies
History and Social Science » Sociology » Urban Studies » City Specific

Modern Housing for America: Policy Struggles in the New Deal Era (Historical Studies of Urban America) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 232 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226702230 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The basic shape of federal policy in housing as in many other areas was determined during the New Deal, but not without conflict among movements and intellectuals advocating alternative directions. While modern housing ideas failed to define the long-term thrust of federal policy, they did influence a short-lived program of the Public Works Administration, as Radford shows in case studies of the highly acclaimed Carl Mackley Houses of Philadelphia and Harlem River Houses of New York.
"Synopsis" by ,
In an era when many decry the failures of federal housing programs, this book introduces us to appealing but largely forgotten alternatives that existed when federal policies were first defined in the New Deal. Led by Catherine Bauer, supporters of the modern housing initiative argued that government should emphasize non-commercial development of imaginatively designed compact neighborhoods with extensive parks and social services. The book explores the question of how Americans might have responded to this option through case studies of experimental developments in Philadelphia and New York. While defeated during the 1930s, modern housing ideas suggest a variety of design and financial strategies that could contribute to solving the housing problems of our own time.

"Synopsis" by ,
In an era when many decry the failures of federal housing programs, this book introduces us to appealing but largely forgotten alternatives that existed when federal policies were first defined in the New Deal. Led by Catherine Bauer, supporters of the modern housing initiative argued that government should emphasize non-commercial development of imaginatively designed compact neighborhoods with extensive parks and social services. The book explores the question of how Americans might have responded to this option through case studies of experimental developments in Philadelphia and New York. While defeated during the 1930s, modern housing ideas suggest a variety of design and financial strategies that could contribute to solving the housing problems of our own time.

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