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Other titles in the European Perspectives: A Series in Social Thought & Cultural Criticism series:

The Sense and Non-Sense of Revolt: The Powers and Limits of Psychoanalysis (European Perspectives: A Series in Social Thought & Cultural Criticism)

The Sense and Non-Sense of Revolt: The Powers and Limits of Psychoanalysis (European Perspectives: A Series in Social Thought & Cultural Criticism) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Kristeva focuses on an intriguing new dilemma. Freud and psychoanalysis taught us that rebellion is what guarantees our independence and our creative abilities. But in our contemporary "entertainment" culture, is rebellion still a viable option? Is it still possible to build and embrace a counterculture? For whom — and against what — and under what forms? Kristeva illustrates the advances and impasses of rebel culture through the experiences of three twentieth-century writers: the existentialist John Paul Sartre, the surrealist Louis Aragon, and the theorist Roland Barthes. The book also offers an illuminating discussion of Freud's groundbreaking work on rebellion, focusing on the symbolic function of patricide in his "Totem and Taboo" and discussing his often neglected vision of language.

Book News Annotation:

Investigates the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, focusing on whether, in our contemporary "entertainment" culture, rebellion is still a viable option and whether it is still possible to build and embrace a counterculture. She illustrates the advances and impasses of rebel culture through the experiences of three 20th-century writers: John Paul Sartre, Louis Aragon, and Roland Barthes. Kristeva is a practicing psychoanalyst and professor of linguistics at the University of Paris. First published in 1996 as volte/>, Arth<`e>me Fayard.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Kristeva focuses on an intriguing new dilemma. Freud and psychoanalysis taught us that rebellion is what guarantees our independence and our creative abilities. But in our contemporary "entertainment" culture, is rebellion still a viable option? Is it still possible to build and embrace a counterculture? For whom — and against what — and under what forms?

Kristeva illustrates the advances and impasses of rebel culture through the experiences of three twentieth-century writers: the existentialist John Paul Sartre, the surrealist Louis Aragon, and the theorist Roland Barthes. The book also offers an illuminating discussion of Freud's groundbreaking work on rebellion, focusing on the symbolic function of patricide in his "Totem and Taboo" and discussing his often neglected vision of language.

Synopsis:

Linguist, psychoanalyst, and cultural theorist, Julia Kristeva is one of the most influential and prolific thinkers of our time. Her writings have broken new ground in the study of the self, the mind, and the ways in which we communicate through language. Her work is unique in that it skillfully brings together psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice, literature, linguistics, and philosophy.

In her latest book on the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, Kristeva focuses on an intriguing new dilemma. Freud and psychoanalysis taught us that rebellion is what guarantees our independence and our creative abilities. But in our contemporary entertainment culture, is rebellion still a viable option? Is it still possible to build and embrace a counterculture? For whom — and against what — and under what forms?

Kristeva illustrates the advances and impasses of rebel culture through the experiences of three twentieth-century writers: the existentialist John Paul Sartre, the surrealist Louis Aragon, and the theorist Roland Barthes. For Kristeva the rebellions championed by these figures — especially the political and seemingly dogmatic political commitments of Aragon and Sartre — strike the post-Cold War reader with a mixture of fascination and rejection. These theorists, according to Kristeva, are involved in a revolution against accepted notions of identity — of one's relation to others. Kristeva places their accomplishments in the context of other revolutionary movements in art, literature, and politics. The book also offers an illuminating discussion of Freud's groundbreaking work on rebellion, focusing on the symbolic function of patricide in his Totem and Taboo and discussing his often neglected vision of language, and underscoring its complex connection to the revolutionary drive.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780231109963
Translator:
Herman, Jeanine
Author:
Herman, Jeanine
Author:
Kristeva, Julia
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Location:
New York :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Psychoanalysis
Subject:
European - French
Subject:
Psychoanalysis and literature
Subject:
French literature
Subject:
Psychoanalysis in literature.
Subject:
Movements - Psychoanalysis
Subject:
French literature -- 20th century.
Subject:
Psychoanalysis and literature -- France.
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
European Perspectives: A Series in Social Thought & Cultural Criticism (Hardcover)
Series Volume:
v. 1
Publication Date:
20000331
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9.27x6.22x.78 in. 1.04 lbs.

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » History
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General
Humanities » Literary Criticism » Literary and Cultural Studies
Humanities » Philosophy » General
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » General

The Sense and Non-Sense of Revolt: The Powers and Limits of Psychoanalysis (European Perspectives: A Series in Social Thought & Cultural Criticism)
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Product details 288 pages Columbia University Press - English 9780231109963 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Kristeva focuses on an intriguing new dilemma. Freud and psychoanalysis taught us that rebellion is what guarantees our independence and our creative abilities. But in our contemporary "entertainment" culture, is rebellion still a viable option? Is it still possible to build and embrace a counterculture? For whom — and against what — and under what forms?

Kristeva illustrates the advances and impasses of rebel culture through the experiences of three twentieth-century writers: the existentialist John Paul Sartre, the surrealist Louis Aragon, and the theorist Roland Barthes. The book also offers an illuminating discussion of Freud's groundbreaking work on rebellion, focusing on the symbolic function of patricide in his "Totem and Taboo" and discussing his often neglected vision of language.

"Synopsis" by , Linguist, psychoanalyst, and cultural theorist, Julia Kristeva is one of the most influential and prolific thinkers of our time. Her writings have broken new ground in the study of the self, the mind, and the ways in which we communicate through language. Her work is unique in that it skillfully brings together psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice, literature, linguistics, and philosophy.

In her latest book on the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, Kristeva focuses on an intriguing new dilemma. Freud and psychoanalysis taught us that rebellion is what guarantees our independence and our creative abilities. But in our contemporary entertainment culture, is rebellion still a viable option? Is it still possible to build and embrace a counterculture? For whom — and against what — and under what forms?

Kristeva illustrates the advances and impasses of rebel culture through the experiences of three twentieth-century writers: the existentialist John Paul Sartre, the surrealist Louis Aragon, and the theorist Roland Barthes. For Kristeva the rebellions championed by these figures — especially the political and seemingly dogmatic political commitments of Aragon and Sartre — strike the post-Cold War reader with a mixture of fascination and rejection. These theorists, according to Kristeva, are involved in a revolution against accepted notions of identity — of one's relation to others. Kristeva places their accomplishments in the context of other revolutionary movements in art, literature, and politics. The book also offers an illuminating discussion of Freud's groundbreaking work on rebellion, focusing on the symbolic function of patricide in his Totem and Taboo and discussing his often neglected vision of language, and underscoring its complex connection to the revolutionary drive.

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