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Green Light: Toward an Art of Evolution (Leonardo)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;Humans have bred plants and animals with an eye to aesthetics for centuries: flowers are selected for colorful blossoms or luxuriant foliage; racehorses are prized for the elegance of their frames. Hybridized plants were first exhibited as fine art in 1936, when the Museum of Modern Art in New York showed Edward Steichen's hybrid delphiniums. Since then, bio art has become a genre; artists work with a variety of living things, including plants, animals, bacteria, slime molds, and fungi. Many commentators have addressed the social and political concerns raised by making art out of living material. In andlt;Iandgt; Green Lightandlt;/Iandgt;, however, George Gessert examines the role that aesthetic perception has played in bio art and other interventions in evolution. Gessert looks at a variety of life forms that humans have helped shape, focusing on plants--the most widely domesticated form of life and the one that has been crucial to his own work as an artist. We learn about pleasure gardens of the Aztecs, cultivated for intoxicating fragrance; the aesthetic standards promoted by national plant societies; a daffodil that looks like a rose; and praise for weeds and wildflowers.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

How humans' aesthetic perceptions have shaped other life forms, from racehorses to ornamental plants.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;How humans' aesthetic perceptions have shaped other life forms, from racehorses to ornamental plants.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Humans have bred plants and animals with an eye to aesthetics for centuries: flowers are selected for colorful blossoms or luxuriant foliage; racehorses are bred for the elegance of their frames. Hybridized plants were first exhibited as fine art in 1936, when the Museum of Modern Art in New York showed Edward Steichen's hybrid delphiniums. Since then, bio art has become a genre; artists work with a variety of living things, including plants, animals, bacteria, slime molds, and fungi. Many commentators have addressed the social and political concerns raised by making art out of living material. In

Synopsis:

Humans have bred plants and animals with an eye to aesthetics for centuries: flowers are selected for colorful blossoms or luxuriant foliage; racehorses are prized for the elegance of their frames. Hybridized plants were first exhibited as fine art in 1936, when the Museum of Modern Art in New York showed Edward Steichen's hybrid delphiniums. Since then, bio art has become a genre; artists work with a variety of living things, including plants, animals, bacteria, slime molds, and fungi. Many commentators have addressed the social and political concerns raised by making art out of living material. In Green Light, however, George Gessert examines the role that aesthetic perception has played in bio art and other interventions in evolution. Gessert looks at a variety of life forms that humans have helped shape, focusing on plants--the most widely domesticated form of life and the one that has been crucial to his own work as an artist. We learn about pleasure gardens of the Aztecs, cultivated for intoxicating fragrance; the aesthetic standards promoted by national plant societies; a daffodil that looks like a rose; and praise for weeds and wildflowers.

About the Author

George Gessert is an artist whose work focuses on the overlap between art and genetics. His exhibits often involve plants he has hybridized or documentation of breeding projects. His writings have appeared in Leonardo, Art Papers, Design Issues, Massachusetts Review, Hortus, Best American Essays 2007, Pushcart Prize XXX, and other publications.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262014144
Author:
Gessert, George
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Nature (aesthetics)
Subject:
Evolution (Biology) -- Philosophy.
Subject:
Subjects & Themes - Plants & Animals
Subject:
Criticism -- Theory.
Subject:
Art - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
MIT Press
Series:
Leonardo Book Series Green Light
Series Volume:
Toward an Art of Evo
Publication Date:
20100326
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
9 b, &, w photos, 8 halftones, 13 line d
Pages:
264
Dimensions:
9 x 7 x 0.5 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Theory and Criticism
Humanities » Philosophy » Aesthetics
Science and Mathematics » Botany » Ethnobotany and Useful Plants

Green Light: Toward an Art of Evolution (Leonardo) New Hardcover
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Product details 264 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262014144 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , How humans' aesthetic perceptions have shaped other life forms, from racehorses to ornamental plants.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;How humans' aesthetic perceptions have shaped other life forms, from racehorses to ornamental plants.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , Humans have bred plants and animals with an eye to aesthetics for centuries: flowers are selected for colorful blossoms or luxuriant foliage; racehorses are bred for the elegance of their frames. Hybridized plants were first exhibited as fine art in 1936, when the Museum of Modern Art in New York showed Edward Steichen's hybrid delphiniums. Since then, bio art has become a genre; artists work with a variety of living things, including plants, animals, bacteria, slime molds, and fungi. Many commentators have addressed the social and political concerns raised by making art out of living material. In
"Synopsis" by , Humans have bred plants and animals with an eye to aesthetics for centuries: flowers are selected for colorful blossoms or luxuriant foliage; racehorses are prized for the elegance of their frames. Hybridized plants were first exhibited as fine art in 1936, when the Museum of Modern Art in New York showed Edward Steichen's hybrid delphiniums. Since then, bio art has become a genre; artists work with a variety of living things, including plants, animals, bacteria, slime molds, and fungi. Many commentators have addressed the social and political concerns raised by making art out of living material. In Green Light, however, George Gessert examines the role that aesthetic perception has played in bio art and other interventions in evolution. Gessert looks at a variety of life forms that humans have helped shape, focusing on plants--the most widely domesticated form of life and the one that has been crucial to his own work as an artist. We learn about pleasure gardens of the Aztecs, cultivated for intoxicating fragrance; the aesthetic standards promoted by national plant societies; a daffodil that looks like a rose; and praise for weeds and wildflowers.
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