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California Design, 1930-1965: "Living in a Modern Way"

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California Design, 1930-1965: "Living in a Modern Way" Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;In 1951, designer Greta Magnusson Grossman observed that California design was andquot;not a superimposed style, but an answer to present conditions.... It has developed out of our own preferences for living in a modern way.andquot; California design influenced the material culture of the entire country, in everything from architecture to fashion. This generously illustrated book, which accompanies a major exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, is the first comprehensive examination of California's mid-century modern design. It begins by tracing the origins of a distinctively California modernism in the 1930s by such European émigrés as Richard Neutra, Rudolph Schindler, and Kem Weber; it finds other specific design influences and innovations in solid-color commercial ceramics, inspirations from Mexico and Asia, new schools for design training, new concepts about leisure, and the conversion of wartime technologies to peacetime use (exemplified by Charles and Ray Eames's plywood and fiberglass furniture). The heart of California Design is the modern California home, famously characterized by open plans conducive to outdoor living. The layouts of modernist homes by Pierre Koenig, Craig Ellwood, and Raphael Soriano, for example, were intended to blur the distinction between indoors and out. Homes were furnished with products from Heath Ceramics, Van Keppel-Green, and Architectural Pottery as well as other, previously unheralded companies and designers. Many objects were designed to be multifunctional: pool and patio furniture that was equally suitable indoors, lighting that was both task and ambient, bookshelves that served as room dividers, and bathing suits that would turn into ensembles appropriate for indoor entertainment. California Design includes 350 images, most in color, of furniture, ceramics, metalwork, architecture, graphic and industrial design, film, textiles, and fashion, and ten incisive essays that trace the rise of the California design aesthetic.andlt;/Pandgt;

Review:

"This book beautifully documents how climate, immigration, and industry influenced California's modern design aesthetic. A booming population throughout the interwar period brought European émigrés like Richard Neutra, Rudolph Schindler, and others into the state. These artists designed pieces that celebrated and embraced casual, indoor-outdoor living. California's centrality to WWII efforts introduced new materials to design, sparking the creativity of regional artists. And then there's Hollywood: Esther Williams swimsuits and the popularity of Paul T. Frankl's rattan furniture among Hollywood celebrities like Charlie Chaplin added glitter to the appeal of the California lifestyle. The essays by 10 design historians complement one another and provide a 360-degree view of the subject. Several of the authors address particular categories of design, such as architecture, textiles/fashion, or graphic design. Others address larger themes, such as the way design was lived day-to-day and the business of selling modern design. The book's interest in comprehensiveness reflects its position as part of a larger initiative to document the history of California art. The book's unfettered design and close coupling of image to text contribute to the overall quality of the book, whether closely read or informally browsed." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Commune was established in Los Angeles in 2004 by four like-minded soulsandmdash;Roman Alonso, Steven Johanknecht, Pamela Shamshiri, and Ramin Shamshiriandmdash; with a common mission: to enhance life through design and to blur the lines between disciplines, eras, and styles. California is for those who refuse to conform and who live for freedom of expression, indoor/outdoor living, and that golden sunshine glinting off the waves of the Pacific. Commune perfectly captures this spirit and embodies a new California style that freely mixes old and new in its layered, highly personal interiors that embrace color, pattern, and texture. This book is the first monograph of Communeandrsquo;s work, featuring its designs for private residences, hotels, commercial spaces, and restaurants, as well as the works they specially commission from virtually everyone in the artisan craftsman movement in California today.

Synopsis:

In 1951, designer Greta Magnusson Grossman observed that California design was "not a superimposed style, but an answer to present conditions....It has developed out of our own preferences for living in a modern way." California design influenced the material culture of the entire country, in everything from architecture to fashion. This generously illustrated book, which accompanies a major exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, is the first comprehensive examination of California's mid-century modern design. It begins by tracing the origins of a distinctively California modernism in the 1930s by such European émigrés as Richard Neutra, Rudolph Schindler, and Kem Weber; it finds other specific design influences and innovations in solid-color commercial ceramics, inspirations from Mexico and Asia, new schools for design training, new concepts about leisure, and the conversion of wartime technologies to peacetime use (exemplified by Charles and Ray Eames's plywood and fiberglass furniture).

The heart of California Design is the modern California home, famously characterized by open plans conducive to outdoor living. The layouts of modernist homes by Pierre Koenig, Craig Ellwood, and Raphael Soriano, for example, were intended to blur the distinction between indoors and out. Homes were furnished with products from Heath Ceramics, Van Keppel-Green, and Architectural Pottery as well as other, previously unheralded companies and designers. Many objects were designed to be multifunctional: pool and patio furniture that was equally suitable indoors, lighting that was both task and ambient, bookshelves that served as room dividers, and bathing suits that would turn into ensembles appropriate for indoor entertainment.

California Design includes 350 images, most in color, of furniture, ceramics, metalwork, architecture, graphic and industrial design, film, textiles, and fashion, and ten incisive essays that trace the rise of the California design aesthetic.

About the Author

Wendy Kaplan is Department Head and Curator of Decorative Arts and Design at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262016070
Author:
Kaplan, Wendy
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Author:
Los Angeles County Museum Of Art
Author:
Shamshiri, Pamela
Author:
Alonso, Roman
Author:
Butler, Nola
Author:
Johanknecht, Steven
Author:
Shamshiri, Ramin
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Art-Folk Art
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
California Design, 1930-1965
Publication Date:
20110916
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
300 4-color illustrations
Pages:
360
Dimensions:
11 x 9 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Design History
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Style and Design
Humanities » Philosophy » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Zoology » General

California Design, 1930-1965: "Living in a Modern Way" New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$64.95 In Stock
Product details 360 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262016070 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This book beautifully documents how climate, immigration, and industry influenced California's modern design aesthetic. A booming population throughout the interwar period brought European émigrés like Richard Neutra, Rudolph Schindler, and others into the state. These artists designed pieces that celebrated and embraced casual, indoor-outdoor living. California's centrality to WWII efforts introduced new materials to design, sparking the creativity of regional artists. And then there's Hollywood: Esther Williams swimsuits and the popularity of Paul T. Frankl's rattan furniture among Hollywood celebrities like Charlie Chaplin added glitter to the appeal of the California lifestyle. The essays by 10 design historians complement one another and provide a 360-degree view of the subject. Several of the authors address particular categories of design, such as architecture, textiles/fashion, or graphic design. Others address larger themes, such as the way design was lived day-to-day and the business of selling modern design. The book's interest in comprehensiveness reflects its position as part of a larger initiative to document the history of California art. The book's unfettered design and close coupling of image to text contribute to the overall quality of the book, whether closely read or informally browsed." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
Commune was established in Los Angeles in 2004 by four like-minded soulsandmdash;Roman Alonso, Steven Johanknecht, Pamela Shamshiri, and Ramin Shamshiriandmdash; with a common mission: to enhance life through design and to blur the lines between disciplines, eras, and styles. California is for those who refuse to conform and who live for freedom of expression, indoor/outdoor living, and that golden sunshine glinting off the waves of the Pacific. Commune perfectly captures this spirit and embodies a new California style that freely mixes old and new in its layered, highly personal interiors that embrace color, pattern, and texture. This book is the first monograph of Communeandrsquo;s work, featuring its designs for private residences, hotels, commercial spaces, and restaurants, as well as the works they specially commission from virtually everyone in the artisan craftsman movement in California today.
"Synopsis" by , In 1951, designer Greta Magnusson Grossman observed that California design was "not a superimposed style, but an answer to present conditions....It has developed out of our own preferences for living in a modern way." California design influenced the material culture of the entire country, in everything from architecture to fashion. This generously illustrated book, which accompanies a major exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, is the first comprehensive examination of California's mid-century modern design. It begins by tracing the origins of a distinctively California modernism in the 1930s by such European émigrés as Richard Neutra, Rudolph Schindler, and Kem Weber; it finds other specific design influences and innovations in solid-color commercial ceramics, inspirations from Mexico and Asia, new schools for design training, new concepts about leisure, and the conversion of wartime technologies to peacetime use (exemplified by Charles and Ray Eames's plywood and fiberglass furniture).

The heart of California Design is the modern California home, famously characterized by open plans conducive to outdoor living. The layouts of modernist homes by Pierre Koenig, Craig Ellwood, and Raphael Soriano, for example, were intended to blur the distinction between indoors and out. Homes were furnished with products from Heath Ceramics, Van Keppel-Green, and Architectural Pottery as well as other, previously unheralded companies and designers. Many objects were designed to be multifunctional: pool and patio furniture that was equally suitable indoors, lighting that was both task and ambient, bookshelves that served as room dividers, and bathing suits that would turn into ensembles appropriate for indoor entertainment.

California Design includes 350 images, most in color, of furniture, ceramics, metalwork, architecture, graphic and industrial design, film, textiles, and fashion, and ten incisive essays that trace the rise of the California design aesthetic.

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