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1 Burnside International Studies- Trade

The Wind of the Hundred Days: How Washington Mismanaged Globalization

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The Wind of the Hundred Days: How Washington Mismanaged Globalization Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;In The Wind of the Hundred Days, a new collection of public policy essays, Jagdish Bhagwati applies his characteristic wit and accessible style to the subject of globalization. Notably, he argues that the true Clinton scandal lay in the administration's mismanagement of globalization — resulting in the paradox of immense domestic policy success combined with dramatic failure on the external front. Bhagwati assigns the bulk of the blame for the East Asian financial and economic crisis — a disaster that prompts him to use as his title the poet Octavio Paz's image of devastation "I met the wind of the hundred days" — to the administration's hasty push for financial liberalization in the region.The administration, Bhagwati claims, has also mishandled the freeing of trade. The administration-hosted WTO meeting in Seattle ended in chaos and the launch of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations was dashed. Bhagwati shows how the administration's failure to get Congress to renew fast-track authority can be attributed to an unimaginative response to the demands of a growing civil society. In several essays, he shows how free trade and social agendas both could have been pursued successfully if the concerns of human-rights, environmental, cultural, and labor activists had been met through creative programs at appropriate international agencies such as the International Labour Organization instead of the WTO and via trade treaties. Bhagwati also criticizes the claim that "globalization needs a human face," arguing that it already has one. He faults the administration for embracing unsubstantiated anti-globalization rhetoric that has made its own preferred option of pursuing globalization that much more difficult.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Provocative essays on international trade, with particular focus on US foreign trade policy.

Synopsis:

The administration, Bhagwati claims, has also mishandled the freeing of trade. The administration-hosted WTO meeting in Seattle ended in chaos and the launch of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations was dashed. Bhagwati shows how the administration's failure to get Congress to renew fast-track authority can be attributed to an unimaginative response to the demands of a growing civil society. In several essays, he shows how free trade and social agendas both could have been pursued successfully if the concerns of human-rights, environmental, cultural, and labor activists had been met through creative programs at appropriate international agencies such as the International Labour Organization instead of the WTO and via trade treaties. Bhagwati also criticizes the claim that globalization needs a human face, arguing that it already has one. He faults the administration for embracing unsubstantiated anti-globalization rhetoric that has made its own preferred option of pursuing globalization that much more difficult.

Synopsis:

In The Wind of the Hundred Days, a new collection of public policy essays, Jagdish Bhagwati applies his characteristic wit and accessible style to the subject of globalization. Notably, he argues that the true Clinton scandal lay in the administration's mismanagement of globalization — resulting in the paradox of immense domestic policy success combined with dramatic failure on the external front. Bhagwati assigns the bulk of the blame for the East Asian financial and economic crisis — a disaster that prompts him to use as his title the poet Octavio Paz's image of devastation "I met the wind of the hundred days" — to the administration's hasty push for financial liberalization in the region.The administration, Bhagwati claims, has also mishandled the freeing of trade. The administration-hosted WTO meeting in Seattle ended in chaos and the launch of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations was dashed. Bhagwati shows how the administration's failure to get Congress to renew fast-track authority can be attributed to an unimaginative response to the demands of a growing civil society. In several essays, he shows how free trade and social agendas both could have been pursued successfully if the concerns of human-rights, environmental, cultural, and labor activists had been met through creative programs at appropriate international agencies such as the International Labour Organization instead of the WTO and via trade treaties. Bhagwati also criticizes the claim that "globalization needs a human face," arguing that it already has one. He faults the administration for embracing unsubstantiated anti-globalization rhetoric that has made its own preferred option of pursuing globalization that much more difficult.

About the Author

Jagdish Bhagwati is University Professor at Columbia University and External Advisor to the Director General, World Trade Organization and Senior Fellow for International Economics with the Council on Foreign Relations. He was named Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association in 2003.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262024952
Subtitle:
How Washington Mismanaged Globalization
Author:
Bhagwati, Jagdish
Author:
Bhagwati, Jagdish
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge, Mass.
Subject:
United states
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
Economics - International
Subject:
Economic History
Subject:
Free trade
Subject:
Capital movements
Subject:
Globalization
Subject:
International - Economics
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Economics - General
Subject:
Globalization - Economic aspects
Subject:
Business-History and Biography
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Series:
The Wind of the Hundred Days
Series Volume:
105-418
Publication Date:
20010102
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
13 illus.
Pages:
397
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1.7 lb

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Related Subjects

Business » History and Biographies
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Economics » Global Economics
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
Science and Mathematics » Biology » General

The Wind of the Hundred Days: How Washington Mismanaged Globalization Used Hardcover
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Product details 397 pages MIT Press - English 9780262024952 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Provocative essays on international trade, with particular focus on US foreign trade policy.
"Synopsis" by , The administration, Bhagwati claims, has also mishandled the freeing of trade. The administration-hosted WTO meeting in Seattle ended in chaos and the launch of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations was dashed. Bhagwati shows how the administration's failure to get Congress to renew fast-track authority can be attributed to an unimaginative response to the demands of a growing civil society. In several essays, he shows how free trade and social agendas both could have been pursued successfully if the concerns of human-rights, environmental, cultural, and labor activists had been met through creative programs at appropriate international agencies such as the International Labour Organization instead of the WTO and via trade treaties. Bhagwati also criticizes the claim that globalization needs a human face, arguing that it already has one. He faults the administration for embracing unsubstantiated anti-globalization rhetoric that has made its own preferred option of pursuing globalization that much more difficult.
"Synopsis" by , In The Wind of the Hundred Days, a new collection of public policy essays, Jagdish Bhagwati applies his characteristic wit and accessible style to the subject of globalization. Notably, he argues that the true Clinton scandal lay in the administration's mismanagement of globalization — resulting in the paradox of immense domestic policy success combined with dramatic failure on the external front. Bhagwati assigns the bulk of the blame for the East Asian financial and economic crisis — a disaster that prompts him to use as his title the poet Octavio Paz's image of devastation "I met the wind of the hundred days" — to the administration's hasty push for financial liberalization in the region.The administration, Bhagwati claims, has also mishandled the freeing of trade. The administration-hosted WTO meeting in Seattle ended in chaos and the launch of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations was dashed. Bhagwati shows how the administration's failure to get Congress to renew fast-track authority can be attributed to an unimaginative response to the demands of a growing civil society. In several essays, he shows how free trade and social agendas both could have been pursued successfully if the concerns of human-rights, environmental, cultural, and labor activists had been met through creative programs at appropriate international agencies such as the International Labour Organization instead of the WTO and via trade treaties. Bhagwati also criticizes the claim that "globalization needs a human face," arguing that it already has one. He faults the administration for embracing unsubstantiated anti-globalization rhetoric that has made its own preferred option of pursuing globalization that much more difficult.
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