Mega Dose
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 30, 2014

Benjamin Parzybok: IMG A Brief History of Video Games Played by Mayors, Presidents, and Emperors



Brandon Bartlett, the fictional mayor of Portland in my novel Sherwood Nation, is addicted to playing video games. In a city he's all but lost... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$14.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Philosophy- General

Other titles in the Bradford Books series:

The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World

by

The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World  Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:


If consciousness is the hard problem in mind science (explaining how the amazing private world of consciousness emerges from neuronal activity) then the really hard problem, writes Owen Flanagan in this provocative book is explaining how meaning is possible in the material world. How can we make sense of the magic and mystery of life naturalistically, without an appeal to the supernatural? How do we say truthful and enchanting things about being human if we accept the fact that we are finite material beings living in a material world, or, in Flanagan's description, short-lived pieces of organized cells and tissue? Flanagan's answer is both naturalistic and enchanting. We all wish to live in a meaningful way, to live a life that really matters, to flourish, to achieve eudaimonia, to be a happy spirit. Flanagan calls his empirical-normative inquiry into the nature, causes, and conditions of human flourishing eudaimonics. Eudaimonics, systematic philosophical investigation that is continuous with science, is the naturalist's response to those who say that science has robbed the world of the meaning that fantastical, wishful stories once provided. Flanagan draws on philosophy, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, and psychology, as well as on transformative mindfulness and self-cultivation practices that come from such nontheistic spiritual traditions as Buddhism, Confucianism, Aristotelianism, and Stoicism, in his quest. He gathers from these disciplines knowledge that will help us understand the nature, causes, and constituents of well-being and advance human flourishing. Eudaimonics can help us find out how to make a difference, how to contribute to the accumulation ofgood effects: how to live a meaningful life.

Synopsis:

A noted philosopher proposes a naturalistic (rather than supernaturalistic) way to solve the "really hard problem": how to live in a meaningful way--how to live a life that really matters--even as a finite material being living in a material world.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;A noted philosopher proposes a naturalistic (rather than supernaturalistic) way to solve the andquot;really hard problemandquot;: how to live in a meaningful way--how to live a life that really matters--even as a finite material being living in a material world. andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;If consciousness is andquot;the hard problemandquot; in mind science--explaining how the amazing private world of consciousness emerges from neuronal activity--then andquot;the really hard problem,andquot; writes Owen Flanagan in this provocative book, is explaining how meaning is possible in the material world. How can we make sense of the magic and mystery of life naturalistically, without an appeal to the supernatural? How do we say truthful and enchanting things about being human if we accept the fact that we are finite material beings living in a material world, or, in Flanagan's description, short-lived pieces of organized cells and tissue? Flanagan's answer is both naturalistic and enchanting. We all wish to live in a meaningful way, to live a life that really matters, to flourish, to achieve eudaimonia--to be a andquot;happy spirit.andquot; Flanagan calls his andquot;empirical-normativeandquot; inquiry into the nature, causes, and conditions of human flourishing eudaimonics. Eudaimonics, systematic philosophical investigation that is continuous with science, is the naturalist's response to those who say that science has robbed the world of the meaning that fantastical, wishful stories once provided. Flanagan draws on philosophy, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, and psychology, as well as on transformative mindfulness and self-cultivation practices that come from such nontheistic spiritual traditions as Buddhism, Confucianism, Aristotelianism, and Stoicism, in his quest. He gathers from these disciplines knowledge that will help us understand the nature, causes, and constituents of well-being and advance human flourishing. Eudaimonics can help us find out how to make a difference, how to contribute to the accumulation of good effects--how to live a meaningful life.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

If consciousness is "the hard problem" in mind science--explaining how the amazing private world of consciousness emerges from neuronal activity--then "the really hard problem," writes Owen Flanagan in this provocative book, is explaining how meaning is possible in the material world. How can we make sense of the magic and mystery of life naturalistically, without an appeal to the supernatural? How do we say truthful and enchanting things about being human if we accept the fact that we are finite material beings living in a material world, or, in Flanagan's description, short-lived pieces of organized cells and tissue? Flanagan's answer is both naturalistic and enchanting. We all wish to live in a meaningful way, to live a life that really matters, to flourish, to achieve eudaimonia--to be a "happy spirit." Flanagan calls his "empirical-normative" inquiry into the nature, causes, and conditions of human flourishing eudaimonics. Eudaimonics, systematic philosophical investigation that is continuous with science, is the naturalist's response to those who say that science has robbed the world of the meaning that fantastical, wishful stories once provided. Flanagan draws on philosophy, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, and psychology, as well as on transformative mindfulness and self-cultivation practices that come from such nontheistic spiritual traditions as Buddhism, Confucianism, Aristotelianism, and Stoicism, in his quest. He gathers from these disciplines knowledge that will help us understand the nature, causes, and constituents of well-being and advance human flourishing. Eudaimonics can help us find out how to make a difference, how to contribute to the accumulation of good effects--how to live a meaningful life.

About the Author

Owen Flanagan is James B. Duke Professor of Philosophy at Duke University. He is the author of Consciousness Reconsidered and The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World, both published by the MIT Press, and other books.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262062640
Subtitle:
Meaning in a Material World
Author:
Flanagan, Owen
Author:
sachusetts Institute of Technology
Author:
Flanagan, Owen J.
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Author:
mas
Publisher:
A Bradford Book
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
General
Subject:
Philosophy & Social Aspects
Subject:
Cognitive Psychology
Subject:
General Philosophy
Subject:
Movements - Humanism
Subject:
Meaning (philosophy)
Subject:
Philosophy : General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
The Really Hard Problem
Publication Date:
20070926
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 fig, 6 tbls illus.
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Why Is There Something Rather Than... Sale Hardcover $9.98
  2. Philosophers Without Gods:... Used Hardcover $14.50
  3. Why Truth Matters Used Trade Paper $4.25
  4. Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain:...
    Used Hardcover $7.95
  5. The Great Enigma: New Collected Poems
    Used Trade Paper $10.00
  6. Rumi: Past and Present, East and... Used Trade Paper $15.00

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Mind and Consciousness
Humanities » Philosophy » General

The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Mit Press - English 9780262062640 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A noted philosopher proposes a naturalistic (rather than supernaturalistic) way to solve the "really hard problem": how to live in a meaningful way--how to live a life that really matters--even as a finite material being living in a material world.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;A noted philosopher proposes a naturalistic (rather than supernaturalistic) way to solve the andquot;really hard problemandquot;: how to live in a meaningful way--how to live a life that really matters--even as a finite material being living in a material world. andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;If consciousness is andquot;the hard problemandquot; in mind science--explaining how the amazing private world of consciousness emerges from neuronal activity--then andquot;the really hard problem,andquot; writes Owen Flanagan in this provocative book, is explaining how meaning is possible in the material world. How can we make sense of the magic and mystery of life naturalistically, without an appeal to the supernatural? How do we say truthful and enchanting things about being human if we accept the fact that we are finite material beings living in a material world, or, in Flanagan's description, short-lived pieces of organized cells and tissue? Flanagan's answer is both naturalistic and enchanting. We all wish to live in a meaningful way, to live a life that really matters, to flourish, to achieve eudaimonia--to be a andquot;happy spirit.andquot; Flanagan calls his andquot;empirical-normativeandquot; inquiry into the nature, causes, and conditions of human flourishing eudaimonics. Eudaimonics, systematic philosophical investigation that is continuous with science, is the naturalist's response to those who say that science has robbed the world of the meaning that fantastical, wishful stories once provided. Flanagan draws on philosophy, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, and psychology, as well as on transformative mindfulness and self-cultivation practices that come from such nontheistic spiritual traditions as Buddhism, Confucianism, Aristotelianism, and Stoicism, in his quest. He gathers from these disciplines knowledge that will help us understand the nature, causes, and constituents of well-being and advance human flourishing. Eudaimonics can help us find out how to make a difference, how to contribute to the accumulation of good effects--how to live a meaningful life.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , If consciousness is "the hard problem" in mind science--explaining how the amazing private world of consciousness emerges from neuronal activity--then "the really hard problem," writes Owen Flanagan in this provocative book, is explaining how meaning is possible in the material world. How can we make sense of the magic and mystery of life naturalistically, without an appeal to the supernatural? How do we say truthful and enchanting things about being human if we accept the fact that we are finite material beings living in a material world, or, in Flanagan's description, short-lived pieces of organized cells and tissue? Flanagan's answer is both naturalistic and enchanting. We all wish to live in a meaningful way, to live a life that really matters, to flourish, to achieve eudaimonia--to be a "happy spirit." Flanagan calls his "empirical-normative" inquiry into the nature, causes, and conditions of human flourishing eudaimonics. Eudaimonics, systematic philosophical investigation that is continuous with science, is the naturalist's response to those who say that science has robbed the world of the meaning that fantastical, wishful stories once provided. Flanagan draws on philosophy, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, and psychology, as well as on transformative mindfulness and self-cultivation practices that come from such nontheistic spiritual traditions as Buddhism, Confucianism, Aristotelianism, and Stoicism, in his quest. He gathers from these disciplines knowledge that will help us understand the nature, causes, and constituents of well-being and advance human flourishing. Eudaimonics can help us find out how to make a difference, how to contribute to the accumulation of good effects--how to live a meaningful life.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.