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The Global Genome: Biotechnology, Politics, and Culture (Leonardo)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;In the age of global biotechnology, DNA can exist as biological material in a test tube, as a sequence in a computer database, and as economically valuable information in a patent. In The Global Genome, Eugene Thacker asks us to consider the relationship of these three entities and argues that — by their existence and their interrelationships — they are fundamentally redefining the notion of biological "life itself."Biological science and the biotech industry are increasingly organized at a global level, in large part because of the use of the Internet in exchanging biological data. International genome sequencing efforts, genomic databases, the development of World Intellectual Property policies, and the "borderless" business of biotech are all evidence of the global intersections of biology and informatics — of genetic codes and computer codes. Thacker points out the internal tension in the very concept of biotechnology: the products are more "tech" than "bio," but the technology itself is fully biological, composed of the biomaterial labor of genes, proteins, cells, and tissues. Is biotechnology a technology at all, he asks, or is it a notion of "life itself" that is inseparable from its use in the biotech industry?The three sections of the book cover the three primary activities of biotechnology today: the encoding of biological materials into digital form — as in bioinformatics and genomics; its recoding in various ways — including the "biocolonialism" of mapping genetically isolated ethnic populations and the newly pervasive concern over "biological security"; and its decoding back into biological materiality — as in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Thacker moves easily from science to philosophy to political economics, enlivening his account with ideas from such thinkers as Georges Bataille, Georges Canguilhem, Michel Foucault, Antonio Negri, and Paul Virilio. The "global genome," says Thacker, makes it impossible to consider biotechnology without the context of globalism.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

How global biotechnology is redefining "life itself."

Synopsis:

How global biotechnology is redefining " life itself."

Synopsis:

In the age of global biotechnology, DNA can exist as biological material in a test tube, as a sequence in a computer database, and as economically valuable information in a patent. In

Synopsis:

In the age of global biotechnology, DNA can exist as biological material in a test tube, as a sequence in a computer database, and as economically valuable information in a patent. In The Global Genome, Eugene Thacker asks us to consider the relationship of these three entities and argues that — by their existence and their interrelationships — they are fundamentally redefining the notion of biological "life itself."Biological science and the biotech industry are increasingly organized at a global level, in large part because of the use of the Internet in exchanging biological data. International genome sequencing efforts, genomic databases, the development of World Intellectual Property policies, and the "borderless" business of biotech are all evidence of the global intersections of biology and informatics — of genetic codes and computer codes. Thacker points out the internal tension in the very concept of biotechnology: the products are more "tech" than "bio," but the technology itself is fully biological, composed of the biomaterial labor of genes, proteins, cells, and tissues. Is biotechnology a technology at all, he asks, or is it a notion of "life itself" that is inseparable from its use in the biotech industry?The three sections of the book cover the three primary activities of biotechnology today: the encoding of biological materials into digital form — as in bioinformatics and genomics; its recoding in various ways — including the "biocolonialism" of mapping genetically isolated ethnic populations and the newly pervasive concern over "biological security"; and its decoding back into biological materiality — as in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Thacker moves easily from science to philosophy to political economics, enlivening his account with ideas from such thinkers as Georges Bataille, Georges Canguilhem, Michel Foucault, Antonio Negri, and Paul Virilio. The "global genome," says Thacker, makes it impossible to consider biotechnology without the context of globalism.

About the Author

Eugene Thacker is Assistant Professor in the School of Literature, Communication, and Culture at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262201551
Subtitle:
Biotechnology, Politics, and Culture
Author:
Thacker, Eugene
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Biotechnology
Subject:
Globalization
Subject:
Biotechnology industries
Subject:
Industries - General
Subject:
Genetics
Subject:
Bioinformatics
Subject:
Business Writing
Copyright:
Series:
Leonardo Book Series The Global Genome
Publication Date:
20050520
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
15 illus.
Pages:
464
Dimensions:
9 x 7 in

Related Subjects

Business » General
Business » Management
Business » Writing
Science and Mathematics » Biology » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Genetics
Science and Mathematics » Energy » General

The Global Genome: Biotechnology, Politics, and Culture (Leonardo) Used Hardcover
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Product details 464 pages MIT Press - English 9780262201551 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , How global biotechnology is redefining "life itself."
"Synopsis" by , How global biotechnology is redefining " life itself."
"Synopsis" by , In the age of global biotechnology, DNA can exist as biological material in a test tube, as a sequence in a computer database, and as economically valuable information in a patent. In
"Synopsis" by , In the age of global biotechnology, DNA can exist as biological material in a test tube, as a sequence in a computer database, and as economically valuable information in a patent. In The Global Genome, Eugene Thacker asks us to consider the relationship of these three entities and argues that — by their existence and their interrelationships — they are fundamentally redefining the notion of biological "life itself."Biological science and the biotech industry are increasingly organized at a global level, in large part because of the use of the Internet in exchanging biological data. International genome sequencing efforts, genomic databases, the development of World Intellectual Property policies, and the "borderless" business of biotech are all evidence of the global intersections of biology and informatics — of genetic codes and computer codes. Thacker points out the internal tension in the very concept of biotechnology: the products are more "tech" than "bio," but the technology itself is fully biological, composed of the biomaterial labor of genes, proteins, cells, and tissues. Is biotechnology a technology at all, he asks, or is it a notion of "life itself" that is inseparable from its use in the biotech industry?The three sections of the book cover the three primary activities of biotechnology today: the encoding of biological materials into digital form — as in bioinformatics and genomics; its recoding in various ways — including the "biocolonialism" of mapping genetically isolated ethnic populations and the newly pervasive concern over "biological security"; and its decoding back into biological materiality — as in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Thacker moves easily from science to philosophy to political economics, enlivening his account with ideas from such thinkers as Georges Bataille, Georges Canguilhem, Michel Foucault, Antonio Negri, and Paul Virilio. The "global genome," says Thacker, makes it impossible to consider biotechnology without the context of globalism.
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