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Communities of Play: Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds

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Communities of Play: Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;Play communities existed long before massively multiplayer online games; they have ranged from bridge clubs to sports leagues, from tabletop role-playing games to Civil War reenactments. With the emergence of digital networks, however, new varieties of adult play communities have appeared, most notably within online games and virtual worlds. Players in these networked worlds sometimes develop a sense of community that transcends the game itself. In Communities of Play, game researcher and designer Celia Pearce explores emergent fan cultures in networked digital worlds--actions by players that do not coincide with the intentions of the game's designers. Pearce looks in particular at the Uru Diaspora--a group of players whose game, Uru: Ages Beyond Myst, closed. These players (primarily baby boomers) immigrated into other worlds, self-identifying as andquot;refugeesandquot;; relocated in There.com, they created a hybrid culture integrating aspects of their old world. Ostracized at first, they became community leaders. Pearce analyzes the properties of virtual worlds and looks at the ways design affects emergent behavior. She discusses the methodologies for studying online games, including a personal account of the sometimes messy process of ethnography. Pearce considers the andquot;play turnandquot; in culture and the advent of a participatory global playground enabled by networked digital games every bit as communal as the global village Marshall McLuhan saw united by television. Countering the ludological definition of play as unproductive and pointing to the long history of pre-digital play practices, Pearce argues that play can be a prelude to creativity.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;The odyssey of a group of andquot;refugeesandquot; from a closed-down online game and an exploration of emergent fan cultures in virtual worlds.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Play communities existed long before massively multiplayer online games; they have ranged from bridge clubs to sports leagues, from tabletop role-playing games to Civil War reenactments. With the emergence of digital networks, however, new varieties of adult play communities have appeared, most notably within online games and virtual worlds. Players in these networked worlds sometimes develop a sense of community that transcends the game itself. In Communities of Play, game researcher and designer Celia Pearce explores emergent fan cultures in networked digital worlds--actions by players that do not coincide with the intentions of the game's designers. Pearce looks in particular at the Uru Diaspora--a group of players whose game, Uru: Ages Beyond Myst, closed. These players (primarily baby boomers) immigrated into other worlds, self-identifying as "refugees"; relocated in There.com, they created a hybrid culture integrating aspects of their old world. Ostracized at first, they became community leaders. Pearce analyzes the properties of virtual worlds and looks at the ways design affects emergent behavior. She discusses the methodologies for studying online games, including a personal account of the sometimes messy process of ethnography. Pearce considers the "play turn" in culture and the advent of a participatory global playground enabled by networked digital games every bit as communal as the global village Marshall McLuhan saw united by television. Countering the ludological definition of play as unproductive and pointing to the long history of pre-digital play practices, Pearce argues that play can be a prelude to creativity.

About the Author

Celia Pearce is Assistant Professor of Digital Media at Georgia Institute of Technology, where she is Director of the Experimental Game Lab and the Emergent Game Group. She is the author of The Interactive Book: A Guide to the Interactive Revolution. Artemesia is her coauthor and avatar.Bonnie Nardi is Professor in the Department of Informatics in the School of Information and Computer Science at the University of California, Irvine.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262516730
Subtitle:
Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds
Author:
Pearce, Celia
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Author:
Nardi, Bonnie A.
Author:
Boellstorff, Tom
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Virtual Reality
Subject:
Software Engineering-Game Design
Subject:
Games-Video Games
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Communities of Play
Publication Date:
20110923
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
67 figures
Pages:
344
Dimensions:
9 x 7 x 0.58 in

Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Social Aspects » General
Computers and Internet » Multimedia » Virtual Reality
Computers and Internet » Software Engineering » Game Design
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Games » Video Games
Science and Mathematics » Popular Science » Computer Science

Communities of Play: Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.95 In Stock
Product details 344 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262516730 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;The odyssey of a group of andquot;refugeesandquot; from a closed-down online game and an exploration of emergent fan cultures in virtual worlds.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , Play communities existed long before massively multiplayer online games; they have ranged from bridge clubs to sports leagues, from tabletop role-playing games to Civil War reenactments. With the emergence of digital networks, however, new varieties of adult play communities have appeared, most notably within online games and virtual worlds. Players in these networked worlds sometimes develop a sense of community that transcends the game itself. In Communities of Play, game researcher and designer Celia Pearce explores emergent fan cultures in networked digital worlds--actions by players that do not coincide with the intentions of the game's designers. Pearce looks in particular at the Uru Diaspora--a group of players whose game, Uru: Ages Beyond Myst, closed. These players (primarily baby boomers) immigrated into other worlds, self-identifying as "refugees"; relocated in There.com, they created a hybrid culture integrating aspects of their old world. Ostracized at first, they became community leaders. Pearce analyzes the properties of virtual worlds and looks at the ways design affects emergent behavior. She discusses the methodologies for studying online games, including a personal account of the sometimes messy process of ethnography. Pearce considers the "play turn" in culture and the advent of a participatory global playground enabled by networked digital games every bit as communal as the global village Marshall McLuhan saw united by television. Countering the ludological definition of play as unproductive and pointing to the long history of pre-digital play practices, Pearce argues that play can be a prelude to creativity.
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