25 Women to Read Before You Die
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays, Recipes | August 19, 2015

    Cara Nicoletti: IMG Ramona Quimby Yogurt-Marinated Chicken Thighs



    As a kid, I read for two reasons: the first, and most common, was to escape from my everyday life by imagining a different one — to read about... Continue »
    1. $19.60 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$30.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
5 Remote Warehouse Environmental Studies- General

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

Other titles in the Urban and Industrial Environments series:

Resisting Global Toxics: Transnational Movements for Environmental Justice (Urban and Industrial Environments)

by

Resisting Global Toxics: Transnational Movements for Environmental Justice (Urban and Industrial Environments) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;Every year, nations and corporations in the andquot;global Northandquot; produce millions of tons of toxic waste. Too often this hazardous material--linked to high rates of illness and death and widespread ecosystem damage--is exported to poor communities of color around the world. In Resisting Global Toxics, David Naguib Pellow examines this practice and charts the emergence of transnational environmental justice movements to challenge and reverse it. Pellow argues that waste dumping across national boundaries from rich to poor communities is a form of transnational environmental inequality that reflects North/South divisions in a globalized world, and that it must be theorized in the context of race, class, nation, and environment. Building on environmental justice studies, environmental sociology, social movement theory, and race theory, and drawing on his own research, interviews, and participant observations, Pellow investigates the phenomenon of global environmental inequality and considers the work of activists, organizations, and networks resisting it. He traces the transnational waste trade from its beginnings in the 1980s to the present day, examining global garbage dumping, the toxic pesticides that are the legacy of the Green Revolution in agriculture, and today's scourge of dumping and remanufacturing high tech and electronics products. The rise of the transnational environmental movements described in Resisting Global Toxics charts a pragmatic path toward environmental justice, human rights, and sustainability.David Naguib Pellow is Professor in the Ethnic Studies Department and Director of California Cultures in Comparative Perspective at the University of California, San Diego. Among his books are the award-winning Garbage Wars: The Struggle for Environmental Justice in Chicago (MIT Press, 2002) and Power, Justice, and the Environment: A Critical Appraisal of the Environmental Justice Movement (coedited with Robert Brulle; MIT Press, 2005).andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Examines the export of hazardous wastes to poor communities of color around the world and charts the global social movements that challenge them.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;Examines the export of hazardous wastes to poor communities of color around the world and charts the global social movements that challenge them.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

This optimistic, accessible, and wide-ranging book examines environmental justice—which focuses on inclusive processes of environmental decision-making for local communities—in the United States, United Kingdom, Sweden, South Korea, China, Bolivia, and Cuba. Karen Bell discusses environmental issues as they relate to a number of other topics, including race, class, industrialization, and politics, with a particular focus on the role of capitalism. Based on over one hundred interviews with politicians, experts, activists, and citizens of these countries, this compelling analysis will be invaluable to anyone engaged in addressing the most urgent environmental and social issues of our time.  

Synopsis:

Every year, nations and corporations in the "global North" produce millions of tons of toxic waste. Too often this hazardous material — inked to high rates of illness and death and widespread ecosystem damage — is exported to poor communities of color around the world. In Resisting Global Toxics, David Naguib Pellow examines this practice and charts the emergence of transnational environmental justice movements to challenge and reverse it. Pellow argues that waste dumping across national boundaries from rich to poor communities is a form of transnational environmental inequality that reflects North/South divisions in a globalized world, and that it must be theorized in the context of race, class, nation, and environment. Building on environmental justice studies, environmental sociology, social movement theory, and race theory, and drawing on his own research, interviews, and participant observations, Pellow investigates the phenomenon of global environmental inequality and considers the work of activists, organizations, and networks resisting it. He traces the transnational waste trade from its beginnings in the 1980s to the present day, examining global garbage dumping, the toxic pesticides that are the legacy of the Green Revolution in agriculture, and today's scourge of dumping and remanufacturing high tech and electronics products. The rise of the transnational environmental movements described in Resisting Global Toxics charts a pragmatic path toward environmental justice, human rights, and sustainability.

About the Author

David Naguib Pellow is Don A. Martindale Endowed Chair in Sociology at the University of Minnesota. Among his books are the award-winning Garbage Wars: The Struggle for Environmental Justice in Chicago (MIT Press, 2002) and Power, Justice, and the Environment: A Critical Appraisal of the Environmental Justice Movement (coedited with Robert Brulle; MIT Press, 2005.)

Table of Contents

Introduction: fighting for humanity

The concept and measurement of environmental justice

The causes of environmental injustice

'Killing yourself is no way to make a living': environmental justice in the United States

'The world has been deceived': environmental justice in the Republic of Korea (South Korea)

'Regulation means bad': environmental justice in the United Kingdom

'We have always been close to nature': environmental justice in Sweden

'The rich consume and the poor suffer the pollution': environmental justice in the Peoples Republic of China

'Recuperating all that we have lost and forgotten': environmental justice in the Plurinational State of Bolivia

'Socialism creates a better opportunity': environmental justice in Cuba

Achieving environmental justice

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262662017
Subtitle:
Transnational Movements for Environmental Justice
Author:
Pellow, David N.
Author:
Pellow, David Naguib
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Author:
Bell, Karen
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Environmental Science
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Developing countries
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection - General
Subject:
Public Policy - Environmental Policy
Subject:
Hazardous wastes
Subject:
Environmental protection
Subject:
Environmental justice.
Subject:
Environmental Studies-Environment
Subject:
General Political Science
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Urban and Industrial Environments Resisting Global Toxics
Publication Date:
20070810
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
3 figures; 3 tables; 2 box illus.
Pages:
358
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Learning Gardens and Sustainability... Used Trade Paper $29.00
  2. The Handbook of Sustainability... New Trade Paper $23.95
  3. Juki Girls, Good Girls: Gender and... Used Trade Paper $11.95

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Social Science » Developing Countries
Reference » Science Reference » Philosophy of Science
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Environment
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Pollution

Resisting Global Toxics: Transnational Movements for Environmental Justice (Urban and Industrial Environments) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$30.95 In Stock
Product details 358 pages Mit Press - English 9780262662017 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Examines the export of hazardous wastes to poor communities of color around the world and charts the global social movements that challenge them.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;Examines the export of hazardous wastes to poor communities of color around the world and charts the global social movements that challenge them.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by ,
This optimistic, accessible, and wide-ranging book examines environmental justice—which focuses on inclusive processes of environmental decision-making for local communities—in the United States, United Kingdom, Sweden, South Korea, China, Bolivia, and Cuba. Karen Bell discusses environmental issues as they relate to a number of other topics, including race, class, industrialization, and politics, with a particular focus on the role of capitalism. Based on over one hundred interviews with politicians, experts, activists, and citizens of these countries, this compelling analysis will be invaluable to anyone engaged in addressing the most urgent environmental and social issues of our time.  

"Synopsis" by , Every year, nations and corporations in the "global North" produce millions of tons of toxic waste. Too often this hazardous material — inked to high rates of illness and death and widespread ecosystem damage — is exported to poor communities of color around the world. In Resisting Global Toxics, David Naguib Pellow examines this practice and charts the emergence of transnational environmental justice movements to challenge and reverse it. Pellow argues that waste dumping across national boundaries from rich to poor communities is a form of transnational environmental inequality that reflects North/South divisions in a globalized world, and that it must be theorized in the context of race, class, nation, and environment. Building on environmental justice studies, environmental sociology, social movement theory, and race theory, and drawing on his own research, interviews, and participant observations, Pellow investigates the phenomenon of global environmental inequality and considers the work of activists, organizations, and networks resisting it. He traces the transnational waste trade from its beginnings in the 1980s to the present day, examining global garbage dumping, the toxic pesticides that are the legacy of the Green Revolution in agriculture, and today's scourge of dumping and remanufacturing high tech and electronics products. The rise of the transnational environmental movements described in Resisting Global Toxics charts a pragmatic path toward environmental justice, human rights, and sustainability.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

       
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.