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Kenya: Between Hope and Despair, 1963-2011

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Kenya: Between Hope and Despair, 1963-2011 Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

After liberating itself from French colonial rule in one of the twentieth centurys most brutal wars of independence, Algeria became a standard-bearer for the non-aligned movement. By the 1990s, however, its revolutionary political model had collapsed, degenerating into a savage conflict between the military and Islamist guerillas that killed some 200,000 citizens.

 

In this lucid and gripping account, Martin Evans and John Phillips explore Algerias recent and very bloody history, demonstrating how the high hopes of independence turned into anger as young Algerians grew increasingly alienated. Unemployed, frustrated by the corrupt military regime, and excluded by the West, the post-independence generation needed new heroes, and some found them in Osama bin Laden and the rising Islamist movement.

 

Evans and Phillips trace the complex roots of this alienation, arguing that Algerias predicament—political instability, pressing economic and social problems, bad governance, a disenfranchised youth—is emblematic of an arc of insecurity stretching from Morocco to Indonesia. Looking back at the pre-colonial and colonial periods, they place Algerias complex present into historical context, demonstrating how successive governments have manipulated the past for their own ends. The result is a fractured society with a complicated and bitter relationship with the Western powers—and an increasing tendency to export terrorism to France, America, and beyond.

Synopsis:

An illuminating account of Kenya's first fifty years of independence and the issues that block the nation's path to prosperity and justice

Synopsis:

In this illuminating account of Kenya's first fifty years of independence, an authority on African history analyzes how ethnic violence, government corruption, inequality, and other difficult issues hinder national prosperity and justice.

Synopsis:

On December 12, 1963, people across Kenya joyfully celebrated independence from British colonial rule, anticipating a bright future of prosperity and social justice. As the nation approaches the fiftieth anniversary of its independence, however, the people's dream remains elusive. During its first five decades Kenya has experienced assassinations, riots, coup attempts, ethnic violence, and political corruption. The ranks of the disaffected, the unemployed, and the poor have multiplied. In this authoritative and insightful account of Kenya's history from 1963 to the present day, Daniel Branch sheds new light on the nation's struggles and the complicated causes behind them.

Branch describes how Kenya constructed itself as a state and how ethnicity has proved a powerful force in national politics from the start, as have disorder and violence. He explores such divisive political issues as the needs of the landless poor, international relations with Britain and with the Cold War superpowers, and the direction of economic development. Tracing an escalation of government corruption over time, the author brings his discussion to the present, paying particular attention to the rigged election of 2007, the subsequent compromise government, and Kenya's prospects as a still-evolving independent state.

Synopsis:

Famous until the 1950s for its religious pluralism and extraordinary cultural heritage, Egypt is now seen as an increasingly repressive and divided land, home of the Muslim Brotherhood and an opaque regime headed by the aging President Mubarak.

In this immensely readable and thoroughly researched book, Tarek Osman explores what has happened to the biggest Arab nation since President Nasser took control of the country in 1954. He examines Egypts central role in the development of the two crucial movements of the period, Arab nationalism and radical Islam; the increasingly contentious relationship between Muslims and Christians; and perhaps most important of all, the rift between the cosmopolitan elite and the mass of the undereducated and underemployed population, more than half of whom are aged under thirty. This is an essential guide to one of the Middle Easts most important but least understood states.

About the Author

Martin Evans is professor of contemporary history at the University of Portsmouth and author of The Memory of Resistance: French Opposition to the Algerian War 1954–62 (1997). John Phillips has reported from Algeria for The Times and other newspapers and is author of Macedonia: Warlords & Rebels in the Balkans (2004).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780300148763
Author:
Branch, Daniel
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Author:
Evans, Martin
Author:
Phillips, John
Author:
Da
Author:
Cockett, Richard
Author:
niel Branch
Author:
Osman, Tarek
Subject:
General History
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
Egypt
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
World History-Africa
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20111131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
30 illus.
Pages:
392
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Africa » Kenya
History and Social Science » World History » Africa
History and Social Science » World History » General

Kenya: Between Hope and Despair, 1963-2011 New Hardcover
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$45.75 In Stock
Product details 392 pages Yale University Press - English 9780300148763 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
An illuminating account of Kenya's first fifty years of independence and the issues that block the nation's path to prosperity and justice
"Synopsis" by ,
In this illuminating account of Kenya's first fifty years of independence, an authority on African history analyzes how ethnic violence, government corruption, inequality, and other difficult issues hinder national prosperity and justice.
"Synopsis" by , On December 12, 1963, people across Kenya joyfully celebrated independence from British colonial rule, anticipating a bright future of prosperity and social justice. As the nation approaches the fiftieth anniversary of its independence, however, the people's dream remains elusive. During its first five decades Kenya has experienced assassinations, riots, coup attempts, ethnic violence, and political corruption. The ranks of the disaffected, the unemployed, and the poor have multiplied. In this authoritative and insightful account of Kenya's history from 1963 to the present day, Daniel Branch sheds new light on the nation's struggles and the complicated causes behind them.

Branch describes how Kenya constructed itself as a state and how ethnicity has proved a powerful force in national politics from the start, as have disorder and violence. He explores such divisive political issues as the needs of the landless poor, international relations with Britain and with the Cold War superpowers, and the direction of economic development. Tracing an escalation of government corruption over time, the author brings his discussion to the present, paying particular attention to the rigged election of 2007, the subsequent compromise government, and Kenya's prospects as a still-evolving independent state.

"Synopsis" by ,
Famous until the 1950s for its religious pluralism and extraordinary cultural heritage, Egypt is now seen as an increasingly repressive and divided land, home of the Muslim Brotherhood and an opaque regime headed by the aging President Mubarak.

In this immensely readable and thoroughly researched book, Tarek Osman explores what has happened to the biggest Arab nation since President Nasser took control of the country in 1954. He examines Egypts central role in the development of the two crucial movements of the period, Arab nationalism and radical Islam; the increasingly contentious relationship between Muslims and Christians; and perhaps most important of all, the rift between the cosmopolitan elite and the mass of the undereducated and underemployed population, more than half of whom are aged under thirty. This is an essential guide to one of the Middle Easts most important but least understood states.

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