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Michelangelo in Ravensbruck: One Woman's War Against the Nazis

Michelangelo in Ravensbruck: One Woman's War Against the Nazis Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In September of 1939, Countess Karolina Lanckoronska, wealthy landowner and professor of art history, watched the Soviet army march into Poland. After joining the resistance, she was arrested, sentenced to death, and held in Ravensbruck concentration camp. There she taught art history to other women who, like her, might be dead in a few days. This brilliantly written memoir records a neglected side of World War II: the mass murder of Poles, the serial horrors inflicted by both Russians and Nazis, and the immense courage of those who resisted.

Review:

"A Polish aristocrat born in Austria, Countess Lanckoronska (1898 — 2002) became an art history professor at the University of Lvov, Poland. When the Soviets invaded in September 1939, the countess joined the resistance and eventually evaded arrest by fleeing to German-occupied Krakw, where she worked with the Polish Red Cross and continued her resistance activities. At Stanislawow, where she had been delivering care packages to prisoners, Lanckoronska was briefly imprisoned and local Gestapo chief Hans Krger confessed to her that he had murdered 23 University of Lvov professors, a war crime she made it her mission to publicize. Imprisoned at Ravensbrck because of her political activities, the ever-resilient Lanckoronska cared for victims of medical experiments and taught art and European history. She eschewed her privileged status to join the ranks of prisoners, but as a Christian Lanckoronska never shared the ordeal of Jewish concentration camp prisoners, and her memoir says little about atrocities committed against European Jewry. Although the style is stilted and restrained, this is still a worthy, unsentimental eyewitness account that sheds welcome light on a tumultuous era of modern Polish history. 8 pages of b&w photos; map." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"This is a fascinating book, though for reasons its author may not have entirely intended. Written in 1945-46 but just published in the United States, 'Michelangelo in Ravensbruck' is a memoir of the German and Soviet occupations of Poland — but it is not the kind of World War II memoir we are used to. The author, who died in 2002 at the age of 104, was a wealthy countess, a professor of art history,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

An inspiring memoir that records a neglected side of World War II

About the Author

Countess Karolina Lanckoronska (1898-2002) survived imprisonment and after the war lived in Rome, where she devoted herself to art history and to Polish culture and learning.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780306815379
Subtitle:
One Woman's War Against the Nazis
Publisher:
Da Capo Press
Translator:
Clark, Noel
Preface:
Hoffman, Eva
Author:
Lanckoro&nacute Ska, Countess Karolina
Author:
Lanckoronska, Karolina
Subject:
General
Subject:
World war, 1939-1945
Subject:
Holocaust
Subject:
Holocaust survivors
Subject:
World
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20070326
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 19.6 oz

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Europe » Eastern Europe » Poland

Michelangelo in Ravensbruck: One Woman's War Against the Nazis
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 368 pages Perseus Books Group - English 9780306815379 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A Polish aristocrat born in Austria, Countess Lanckoronska (1898 — 2002) became an art history professor at the University of Lvov, Poland. When the Soviets invaded in September 1939, the countess joined the resistance and eventually evaded arrest by fleeing to German-occupied Krakw, where she worked with the Polish Red Cross and continued her resistance activities. At Stanislawow, where she had been delivering care packages to prisoners, Lanckoronska was briefly imprisoned and local Gestapo chief Hans Krger confessed to her that he had murdered 23 University of Lvov professors, a war crime she made it her mission to publicize. Imprisoned at Ravensbrck because of her political activities, the ever-resilient Lanckoronska cared for victims of medical experiments and taught art and European history. She eschewed her privileged status to join the ranks of prisoners, but as a Christian Lanckoronska never shared the ordeal of Jewish concentration camp prisoners, and her memoir says little about atrocities committed against European Jewry. Although the style is stilted and restrained, this is still a worthy, unsentimental eyewitness account that sheds welcome light on a tumultuous era of modern Polish history. 8 pages of b&w photos; map." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
An inspiring memoir that records a neglected side of World War II
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