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The Education of a British-Protected Child: Essays

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The Education of a British-Protected Child: Essays Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From the celebrated author of Things Fall Apart and winner of the Man Booker International Prize comes a new collection of autobiographical essays—his first new book in more than twenty years.

Chinua Achebes characteristically measured and nuanced voice is everywhere present in these seventeen beautifully written pieces. In a preface, he discusses his historic visit to his Nigerian homeland on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Things Fall Apart, the story of his tragic car accident nearly twenty years ago, and the potent symbolism of President Obamas election. In “The Education of a British-Protected Child,” Achebe gives us a vivid portrait of growing up in colonial Nigeria and inhabiting its “middle ground,” recalling both his happy memories of reading novels in secondary school and the harsher truths of colonial rule. In “Spelling Our Proper Name,” Achebe considers the African-American diaspora, meeting and reading Langston Hughes and James Baldwin, and learning what it means not to know “from whence he came.” The complex politics and history of Africa figure in “What Is Nigeria to Me?,” “Africas Tarnished Name,” and “Politics and Politicians of Language in African Literature.” And Achebes extraordinary family life comes into view in “My Dad and Me” and “My Daughters,” where we observe the effect of Christian missionaries on his father and witness the culture shock of raising “brown” children in America.

Charmingly personal, intellectually disciplined, and steadfastly wise, The Education of a British-Protected Child is an indispensable addition to the remarkable Achebe oeuvre.

Synopsis:

From the celebrated author of Things Fall Apart and winner of the Man Booker International Prize comes a new collection of autobiographical essayshis first new book in more than twenty years.

Chinua Achebes characteristically measured and nuanced voice is everywhere present in these seventeen beautifully written pieces. In a preface, he discusses his historic visit to his Nigerian homeland on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Things Fall Apart, the story of his tragic car accident nearly twenty years ago, and the potent symbolism of President Obamas election. In “The Education of a British-Protected Child,” Achebe gives us a vivid portrait of growing up in colonial Nigeria and inhabiting its “middle ground,” recalling both his happy memories of reading novels in secondary school and the harsher truths of colonial rule. In “Spelling Our Proper Name,” Achebe considers the African-American diaspora, meeting and reading Langston Hughes and James Baldwin, and learning what it means not to know “from whence he came.” The complex politics and history of Africa figure in “What Is Nigeria to Me?,” “Africas Tarnished Name,” and “Politics and Politicians of Language in African Literature.” And Achebes extraordinary family life comes into view in “My Dad and Me” and “My Daughters,” where we observe the effect of Christian missionaries on his father and witness the culture shock of raising “brown” children in America.

Charmingly personal, intellectually disciplined, and steadfastly wise, The Education of a British-Protected Child is an indispensable addition to the remarkable Achebe oeuvre.

About the Author

Chinua Achebe lives in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. He was awarded the Man Booker International Prize in 2007.

Table of Contents

Preface

The Education of a British-Protected Child

The Sweet Aroma of Zik's Kitchen: Growing Up in the Ambience of a Legend

My Dad and Me

What Is Nigeria to Me?

Traveling White

Spelling Our Proper Name

My Daughters

Recognitions

Africa's Tarnished Name

Politics and Politicians of Language in African Literature

African Literature as Restoration of Celebration

Teaching Things Fall Apart

Martin Luther King and Africa

The University and the Leadership Factor in Nigerian Politics

 

Stanley Diamond

 

Africa Is People

 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307272553
Subtitle:
Essays
Author:
Achebe, Chinua
Publisher:
Knopf
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Nigeria
Subject:
Achebe, Chinua
Subject:
General
Subject:
Anthologies-Essays
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20091006
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
8.80x5.70x.81 in. .73 lbs.

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Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Education of a British-Protected Child: Essays Used Hardcover
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Product details 192 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780307272553 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , From the celebrated author of Things Fall Apart and winner of the Man Booker International Prize comes a new collection of autobiographical essayshis first new book in more than twenty years.

Chinua Achebes characteristically measured and nuanced voice is everywhere present in these seventeen beautifully written pieces. In a preface, he discusses his historic visit to his Nigerian homeland on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Things Fall Apart, the story of his tragic car accident nearly twenty years ago, and the potent symbolism of President Obamas election. In “The Education of a British-Protected Child,” Achebe gives us a vivid portrait of growing up in colonial Nigeria and inhabiting its “middle ground,” recalling both his happy memories of reading novels in secondary school and the harsher truths of colonial rule. In “Spelling Our Proper Name,” Achebe considers the African-American diaspora, meeting and reading Langston Hughes and James Baldwin, and learning what it means not to know “from whence he came.” The complex politics and history of Africa figure in “What Is Nigeria to Me?,” “Africas Tarnished Name,” and “Politics and Politicians of Language in African Literature.” And Achebes extraordinary family life comes into view in “My Dad and Me” and “My Daughters,” where we observe the effect of Christian missionaries on his father and witness the culture shock of raising “brown” children in America.

Charmingly personal, intellectually disciplined, and steadfastly wise, The Education of a British-Protected Child is an indispensable addition to the remarkable Achebe oeuvre.

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