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1 Local Warehouse African American Studies- General

Enough: The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America--And What We Can Do a

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Enough: The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America--And What We Can Do a Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Half a century after brave Americans took to the streets to raise the bar of opportunity for all races, Juan Williams writes that too many black Americans are in crisis—caught in a twisted hip-hop culture, dropping out of school, ending up in jail, having babies when they are not ready to be parents, and falling to the bottom in twenty-first-century global economic competition.

In Enough, Juan Williams issues a lucid, impassioned clarion call to do the right thing now, before we travel so far off the glorious path set by generations of civil rights heroes that there can be no more reaching back to offer a hand and rescue those being left behind.

Inspired by Bill Cosbys now famous speech at the NAACP gala celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Brown decision integrating schools, Williams makes the case that while there is still racism, it is way past time for black Americans to open their eyes to the “culture of failure” that exists within their community. He raises the banner of proud black traditional values—self-help, strong families, and belief in God—that sustained black people through generations of oppression and flowered in the exhilarating promise of the modern civil rights movement. Williams asks what happened to keeping our eyes on the prize by proving the case for equality with black excellence and achievement.

He takes particular aim at prominent black leaders—from Al Sharpton to Jesse Jackson to Marion Barry. Williams exposes the call for reparations as an act of futility, a detour into self-pity; he condemns the “Stop Snitching” campaign as nothing more than a surrender to criminals; and he decries the glorification of materialism, misogyny, and murder as a corruption of a rich black culture, a tragic turn into pornographic excess that is hurting young black minds, especially among the poor.

Reinforcing his incisive observations with solid research and alarming statistical data, Williams offers a concrete plan for overcoming the obstacles that now stand in the way of African Americans full participation in the nations freedom and prosperity. Certain to be widely discussed and vehemently debated, Enough is a bold, perceptive, solution-based look at African American life, culture, and politics today.

Review:

"When Bill Cosby addressed a 50th-anniversary celebration of Brown v. Board of Education, he created a major controversy with seemingly inoffensive counsel ('begin with getting a high school education, not having children until one is twenty-one and married, working hard at any job, and being good parents'). Building from Cosby's speech, NPR/Fox journalist Williams offers his ballast to Cosby's position. Williams starts with the question, 'Why are so many black Americans, people born inside the gates of American opportunity, still living as if they were locked out from all America has to offer?' His answers include the debacle of big-city politics under self-serving black politicians; reparations as 'a divisive dead-end idea'; the parlous state of city schools 'under the alliance between the civil rights leaders and the teachers' unions'; and the transformation of rap from 'its willingness to confront establishment and stereotypes' to 'America's late-night masturbatory fantasy.' A sense of the erosion of 'the high moral standing of civil rights' underlies Cosby's anguish and Williams's anger. Politically interested readers of a mildly conservative bent will find this book sheer dynamite. (Aug.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"In 1963 James Baldwin emerged as an oracle on race relations in the service of transforming American democracy. A masterpiece of criticism, 'The Fire Next Time' cast Baldwin as a modern-day Jeremiah warning the nation against impending doom posed by segregation, institutional racism and white supremacy. 'Time catches up with kingdoms and crushes them,' he cautioned.

More than 40 years later,... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

One of the country's best known and most respected black journalists attacks the failure of the post-Civil Rights generation of African Americans to seize on the gains of that historic movement.

About the Author

Juan Williams is a senior correspondent for NPR®. He is also a political analyst for the Fox News Channel and a panelist on Fox News Sunday. He is the author of Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary and Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years, 1954-1965, among other books. During his twenty-one year career at The Washington Post, Williams served as an editorial writer, op-ed columnist, and White House correspondent. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307338235
Subtitle:
The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America--and What We Can Do About It
Author:
Williams, Juan
Publisher:
Crown
Subject:
General
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Race relations
Subject:
Minority Studies - Race Relations
Subject:
Racism
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - General
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
Political Process - Leadership
Subject:
Political Advocacy
Subject:
African American leadership
Subject:
African Americans--Politics and government
Subject:
General Current Events
Subject:
African American Studies-General
Subject:
African American Studies
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20060801
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
1.25 in.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration

Enough: The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America--And What We Can Do a Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Crown Publishers - English 9780307338235 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "When Bill Cosby addressed a 50th-anniversary celebration of Brown v. Board of Education, he created a major controversy with seemingly inoffensive counsel ('begin with getting a high school education, not having children until one is twenty-one and married, working hard at any job, and being good parents'). Building from Cosby's speech, NPR/Fox journalist Williams offers his ballast to Cosby's position. Williams starts with the question, 'Why are so many black Americans, people born inside the gates of American opportunity, still living as if they were locked out from all America has to offer?' His answers include the debacle of big-city politics under self-serving black politicians; reparations as 'a divisive dead-end idea'; the parlous state of city schools 'under the alliance between the civil rights leaders and the teachers' unions'; and the transformation of rap from 'its willingness to confront establishment and stereotypes' to 'America's late-night masturbatory fantasy.' A sense of the erosion of 'the high moral standing of civil rights' underlies Cosby's anguish and Williams's anger. Politically interested readers of a mildly conservative bent will find this book sheer dynamite. (Aug.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , One of the country's best known and most respected black journalists attacks the failure of the post-Civil Rights generation of African Americans to seize on the gains of that historic movement.
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