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Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain (Vintage)

by

Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain (Vintage) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

If the conscious mind — the part you consider to be you — is just the tip of the iceberg, what is the rest doing?

In this sparkling and provocative book, renowned neuroscientist David Eagleman navigates the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate its surprising mysteries. Why can your foot move halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead? Is there a true Mel Gibson? How is your brain like a conflicted democracy engaged in civil war? What do Odysseus and the subprime mortgage meltdown have in common? Why are people whose names begin with J more like to marry other people whose names begin with J? And why is it so difficult to keep a secret?

Taking in brain damage, plane spotting, dating, drugs, beauty, infidelity, synesthesia, criminal law, artificial intelligence, and visual illusions, Incognito is a thrilling subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions.

Review:

"Original and provocative. . . . A smart, captivating book that will give you a prefrontal workout." Nature

Review:

"A popularizer of impressive gusto...[Eagleman] aims, grandly, to do for the study of the mind what Copernicus did for the study of the stars....Incognito proposes a grand new account of the relationship between consciousness and the brain. It is full of dazzling ideas, as it is chockablock with facts and instances." The New York Observer

Review:

"Eagleman engagingly sums up recent discoveries about the unconscious processes that dominate our mental life....[He] is the kind of guy who really does make being a neuroscientist look like fun." The New York Times

Review:

"Although Incognito is fast-paced, mind-bending stuff, it's a book for regular folks. Eagleman does a brilliant job refining heavy science into a compelling read. He is a gifted writer." Houston Chronicle

Review:

"Eagleman has a talent for testing the untestable, for taking seemingly sophomoric notions and using them to nail down the slippery stuff of consciousness." The New Yorker

Review:

"Incognito does the right thing by diving straight into the deep end and trying to swim. Eagleman, by imagining the future so vividly, puts into relief just how challenging neuroscience is, and will be." The Boston Globe

Review:

"Your mind is an elaborate trick, and mastermind David Eagleman explains how the trick works with great lucidity and amazement. Your mind will thank you." Wired

Review:

"A fun read by a smart person for smart people....It will attract a new generation to ponder their inner workings." New Scientist

Review:

"Fascinating....Eagleman has the ability to turn hard science and jargon into interesting and relatable prose, illuminating the mind's processes with clever analogies and metaphors." Salt Lake City Weekly

Review:

"Touches on some of the more intriguing cul-de-sacs of human behavior." Santa Cruz Sentinel

Review:

"Startling....It's a book that will leave you looking at yourself — and the world — differently." Austin American-Statesman

Review:

"Sparkling and provocative....A thrilling subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions." The Courier-Journal

Review:

"After you read Eagleman's breezy treatment of the brain, you will marvel at how much is illusory that we think is real, and how we sometimes function on autopilot without consciously knowing what is happening....This is a fascinating book." The Advocate

Review:

"A pleasure to read....If a reader is looking for a fun but illuminating read, Incognito is a good choice. With its nice balance between hard science and entertaining anecdotes, it is a good alternative to the usual brainless summer blockbusters." Deseret News

Review:

"Eagleman presents difficult neuroscience concepts in an energetic, casual voice with plenty of analogies and examples to ensure that what could easily be an overwhelming catalog of facts remains engaging and accessible....The ideas in Eagleman's book are well-articulated and entertaining, elucidated with the intelligent, casual tone of an enthusiastic university lecturer." TheMillions.com

Review:

"Written in clear, precise language, the book is sure to appeal to readers with an interest in psychology and the human mind, but it will also please people who just want to know, with a little more clarity, what is going on inside their own skulls." Booklist

Review:

"Eagleman engagingly sums up recent discoveries about the unconscious processes that dominate our mental life." The New York Times Book Review

Synopsis:

Parents, teachers, bosses spend hours asking their constituencies to pay attention, to focus.and#160; Yet wandering minds are common--even in the best of us.and#160; In fact, for a full 50% of our waking hours, our minds are not focused on tasks at hand.and#160; And rest assured, this is actually a good thing.and#160;and#160; We are biologically disposed to alternate between paying attention and thinking about something else. Do these lapses provide the rest and relaxation our brains need to recover from periods of concentration?and#160; Or are these neurological interludes purely for pleasure?

In The Wandering Mind, Corballis argues that mind-wandering has many constructive and adaptive features.and#160; These range fromand#160; mental time traveland#151;the wandering back and forth through time, not only to plan our futures based on past experience, but also to generate a continuous sense of who we are--to the ability to inhabit the minds of others, increasing empathy and social understanding. Through mind-wandering, we invent, tell stories, and expand our mental horizons. Mind wandering , hardly the sign of a faulty network or aimless distraction, actually underwrites creativity, whether as a Wordsworth wandering lonely as a cloud, or an Einstein imagining himself travelling on a beam of light.and#160; Corballis takes readers on a mental journey in chapters that can be savored piecemeal, as the minds of readers wander in different ways, and sometimes have limited attentional capacity.and#160;

Rooted in neuroscience, psychology and evolutionary biology, but written with Corballisand#8217; signature wit and wisdom, The Wandering Mind illuminates those murky regions of the brain where dreams and religion, fiction and fantasy lurk.

Synopsis:

If weand#8217;ve done our job welland#151;and, letand#8217;s be honest, if we're luckyand#151;youand#8217;ll read to the end of this description. Most likely, however, you wonand#8217;t. Somewhere in the middle of the next paragraph, your mind will wander off. Minds wander. Thatand#8217;s just how it is.

and#160;

That may be bad news for me, but is it bad news for people in general? Does the fact that as much as fifty percent of our waking hours find us failing to focus on the task at hand represent a problem? Michael Corballis doesnand#8217;t think so, and with The Wandering Mind, he shows us why, rehabilitating woolgathering and revealing its incredibly useful effects. Drawing on the latest research from cognitive science and evolutionary biology, Corballis shows us how mind-wandering not only frees us from moment-to-moment drudgery, but also from the limitations of our immediate selves. Mind-wandering strengthens our imagination, fueling the flights of invention, storytelling, and empathy that underlie our shared humanity; furthermore, he explains, our tendency to wander back and forth through the timeline of our lives is fundamental to our very sense of ourselves as coherent, continuing personalities.

and#160;

Full of unusual examples and surprising discoveries, The Wandering Mind mounts a vigorous defense of inattentionand#173;and#151;even as it never fails to hold the readerand#8217;s.

Synopsis:

If the conscious mind--the part you consider to be you--is just the tip of the iceberg, what is the rest doing?

 

In this sparkling and provocative book, renowned neuroscientist David Eagleman navigates the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate its surprising mysteries. Why can your foot move halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead? Is there a true Mel Gibson? How is your brain like a conflicted democracy engaged in civil war? What do Odysseus and the subprime mortgage meltdown have in common? Why are people whose names begin with J more like to marry other people whose names begin with J? And why is it so difficult to keep a secret?

 

Taking in brain damage, plane spotting, dating, drugs, beauty, infidelity, synesthesia, criminal law, artificial intelligence, and visual illusions, Incognito is a thrilling subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions.

About the Author

David Eagleman is a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine, where he directs the Laboratory for Perception and Action as well as the Initiative on Neuroscience and Law. His scientific research has been published in journals from Science to Nature, and his neuroscience books include Wednesday Is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia, Why the Net Matters, and the forthcoming Live-Wired. He is also the author of the internationally best-selling book of fiction Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307389923
Author:
Eagleman, David
Publisher:
Vintage Books
Author:
Corballis, Michael C.
Author:
Eagleman, David M.
Subject:
Biology
Subject:
Neuropsychology
Subject:
psychology;science;neuroscience;brain;non-fiction;biology;neuropsychology;cognitive science;consciousness;popular science;neurology
Subject:
science;psychology;neuroscience;brain;non-fiction;biology;neuropsychology;cognitive science;consciousness;popular science;neurology;cognition
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Vintage
Publication Date:
20120531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 halftone
Pages:
184
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain (Vintage) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$15.95 In Stock
Product details 184 pages Vintage - English 9780307389923 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Original and provocative. . . . A smart, captivating book that will give you a prefrontal workout."
"Review" by , "A popularizer of impressive gusto...[Eagleman] aims, grandly, to do for the study of the mind what Copernicus did for the study of the stars....Incognito proposes a grand new account of the relationship between consciousness and the brain. It is full of dazzling ideas, as it is chockablock with facts and instances."
"Review" by , "Eagleman engagingly sums up recent discoveries about the unconscious processes that dominate our mental life....[He] is the kind of guy who really does make being a neuroscientist look like fun."
"Review" by , "Although Incognito is fast-paced, mind-bending stuff, it's a book for regular folks. Eagleman does a brilliant job refining heavy science into a compelling read. He is a gifted writer."
"Review" by , "Eagleman has a talent for testing the untestable, for taking seemingly sophomoric notions and using them to nail down the slippery stuff of consciousness."
"Review" by , "Incognito does the right thing by diving straight into the deep end and trying to swim. Eagleman, by imagining the future so vividly, puts into relief just how challenging neuroscience is, and will be."
"Review" by , "Your mind is an elaborate trick, and mastermind David Eagleman explains how the trick works with great lucidity and amazement. Your mind will thank you."
"Review" by , "A fun read by a smart person for smart people....It will attract a new generation to ponder their inner workings."
"Review" by , "Fascinating....Eagleman has the ability to turn hard science and jargon into interesting and relatable prose, illuminating the mind's processes with clever analogies and metaphors."
"Review" by , "Touches on some of the more intriguing cul-de-sacs of human behavior."
"Review" by , "Startling....It's a book that will leave you looking at yourself — and the world — differently."
"Review" by , "Sparkling and provocative....A thrilling subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions."
"Review" by , "After you read Eagleman's breezy treatment of the brain, you will marvel at how much is illusory that we think is real, and how we sometimes function on autopilot without consciously knowing what is happening....This is a fascinating book."
"Review" by , "A pleasure to read....If a reader is looking for a fun but illuminating read, Incognito is a good choice. With its nice balance between hard science and entertaining anecdotes, it is a good alternative to the usual brainless summer blockbusters."
"Review" by , "Eagleman presents difficult neuroscience concepts in an energetic, casual voice with plenty of analogies and examples to ensure that what could easily be an overwhelming catalog of facts remains engaging and accessible....The ideas in Eagleman's book are well-articulated and entertaining, elucidated with the intelligent, casual tone of an enthusiastic university lecturer."
"Review" by , "Written in clear, precise language, the book is sure to appeal to readers with an interest in psychology and the human mind, but it will also please people who just want to know, with a little more clarity, what is going on inside their own skulls."
"Review" by , "Eagleman engagingly sums up recent discoveries about the unconscious processes that dominate our mental life."
"Synopsis" by ,
Parents, teachers, bosses spend hours asking their constituencies to pay attention, to focus.and#160; Yet wandering minds are common--even in the best of us.and#160; In fact, for a full 50% of our waking hours, our minds are not focused on tasks at hand.and#160; And rest assured, this is actually a good thing.and#160;and#160; We are biologically disposed to alternate between paying attention and thinking about something else. Do these lapses provide the rest and relaxation our brains need to recover from periods of concentration?and#160; Or are these neurological interludes purely for pleasure?

In The Wandering Mind, Corballis argues that mind-wandering has many constructive and adaptive features.and#160; These range fromand#160; mental time traveland#151;the wandering back and forth through time, not only to plan our futures based on past experience, but also to generate a continuous sense of who we are--to the ability to inhabit the minds of others, increasing empathy and social understanding. Through mind-wandering, we invent, tell stories, and expand our mental horizons. Mind wandering , hardly the sign of a faulty network or aimless distraction, actually underwrites creativity, whether as a Wordsworth wandering lonely as a cloud, or an Einstein imagining himself travelling on a beam of light.and#160; Corballis takes readers on a mental journey in chapters that can be savored piecemeal, as the minds of readers wander in different ways, and sometimes have limited attentional capacity.and#160;

Rooted in neuroscience, psychology and evolutionary biology, but written with Corballisand#8217; signature wit and wisdom, The Wandering Mind illuminates those murky regions of the brain where dreams and religion, fiction and fantasy lurk.

"Synopsis" by ,
If weand#8217;ve done our job welland#151;and, letand#8217;s be honest, if we're luckyand#151;youand#8217;ll read to the end of this description. Most likely, however, you wonand#8217;t. Somewhere in the middle of the next paragraph, your mind will wander off. Minds wander. Thatand#8217;s just how it is.

and#160;

That may be bad news for me, but is it bad news for people in general? Does the fact that as much as fifty percent of our waking hours find us failing to focus on the task at hand represent a problem? Michael Corballis doesnand#8217;t think so, and with The Wandering Mind, he shows us why, rehabilitating woolgathering and revealing its incredibly useful effects. Drawing on the latest research from cognitive science and evolutionary biology, Corballis shows us how mind-wandering not only frees us from moment-to-moment drudgery, but also from the limitations of our immediate selves. Mind-wandering strengthens our imagination, fueling the flights of invention, storytelling, and empathy that underlie our shared humanity; furthermore, he explains, our tendency to wander back and forth through the timeline of our lives is fundamental to our very sense of ourselves as coherent, continuing personalities.

and#160;

Full of unusual examples and surprising discoveries, The Wandering Mind mounts a vigorous defense of inattentionand#173;and#151;even as it never fails to hold the readerand#8217;s.

"Synopsis" by , If the conscious mind--the part you consider to be you--is just the tip of the iceberg, what is the rest doing?

 

In this sparkling and provocative book, renowned neuroscientist David Eagleman navigates the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate its surprising mysteries. Why can your foot move halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead? Is there a true Mel Gibson? How is your brain like a conflicted democracy engaged in civil war? What do Odysseus and the subprime mortgage meltdown have in common? Why are people whose names begin with J more like to marry other people whose names begin with J? And why is it so difficult to keep a secret?

 

Taking in brain damage, plane spotting, dating, drugs, beauty, infidelity, synesthesia, criminal law, artificial intelligence, and visual illusions, Incognito is a thrilling subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions.

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