Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    What I'm Giving | November 29, 2014

    Neil Patrick Harris: IMG Neil Patrick Harris: What I'm Giving



    At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$8.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Hawthorne Economics- General

Aftershock: The Next Economy and America's Future

by

Aftershock: The Next Economy and America's Future Cover

ISBN13: 9780307592811
ISBN10: 0307592812
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $8.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A brilliant new reading of the economic crisis — and a plan for dealing with the challenge of its aftermath — by one of our most trenchant and informed experts.

When the nation's economy foundered in 2008, blame was directed almost universally at Wall Street. But Robert B. Reich suggests a different reason for the meltdown, and for a perilous road ahead. He argues that the real problem is structural: it lies in the increasing concentration of income and wealth at the top, and in a middle class that has had to go deeply into debt to maintain a decent standard of living.

Persuasively and straightforwardly, Reich reveals how precarious our situation still is. The last time in American history when wealth was so highly concentrated at the top — indeed, when the top 1 percent of the population was paid 23 percent of the nation's income — was in 1928, just before the Great Depression. Such a disparity leads to ever greater booms followed by ever deeper busts.

Reich's thoughtful and detailed account of where we are headed over the next decades reveals the essential truth about our economy that is driving our politics and shaping our future. With keen insight, he shows us how the middle class lacks enough purchasing power to buy what the economy can produce and has adopted coping mechanisms that have a negative impact on their quality of life; how the rich use their increasing wealth to speculate; and how an angrier politics emerges as more Americans conclude that the game is rigged for the benefit of a few. Unless this trend is reversed, the Great Recession will only be repeated.

Reich's assessment of what must be done to reverse course and ensure that prosperity is widely shared represents the path to a necessary and long-overdue transformation. Aftershock is a practical, humane, and much-needed blueprint for both restoring America's economy and rebuilding our society.

Review:

"Reich (Supercapitalism), secretary of labor under Bill Clinton and former economic adviser to President Obama, argues that Obama's stimulus package will not catalyze real recovery because it fails to address 40 years of increasing income inequality. The lessons are in the roots of and responses to the Great Depression, according to Reich, who compares the speculation frenzies of the 1920s — 1930s with present-day ones, while showing how Keynesian forerunners like FDR's Federal Reserve Board chair, Marriner Eccles, diagnosed wealth disparity as the leading stress leading up to the Depression. By contrast, sharing the gains of an expanding economy with the middle class brought unprecedented prosperity in the postwar decades, as the majority of workers earned enough to buy what they produced. Despite occasional muddled analyses (of the offshoring of industrial production in the 1990s, for example), Reich's thesis is well argued and frighteningly plausible: without a return to the 'basic bargain' (that workers are also consumers), the 'aftershock' of the Great Recession includes long-term high unemployment and a political backlash — a crisis, he notes with a sort of grim optimism, that just might be painful enough to encourage necessary structural reforms. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Review:

"Former Secretary of Labor Reich...argues that America will not have a sustained economic recovery until the middle class has more buying power.... Lucid and cogent." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Ensured a current-events hearing by his public prominence, Reich may find his readership defined by those in tune with his short tracts expansionist view of government." Booklist

Synopsis:

A brilliant reading of the economic crisis and how we should deal with its aftermath.

When the nation’s economy foundered in 2008, blame was almost universally directed at Wall Street. But celebrated economic policy maker and political theorist Robert B. Reich suggests a different reason for the meltdown, and for a potentially treacherous road ahead. Reich argues that the real problem is structural: it lies in the increasing concentration of income and wealth at the top — and a middle class that had to go deeply into debt to maintain a decent standard of living.

His thoughtful and detailed account of where we are headed over the next decades reveals the essential truth about our economy that is driving our politics and shaping our future. His assessment of what must be done to ensure that prosperity is widely shared — a much broader safety net for the middle class to be financed by higher marginal tax rates on the very wealthy — heralds a necessary and long-overdue transformation.

Here is a practical, humane, and much-needed blueprint for lastingly improving America’s economy.

Synopsis:

Offering a much-needed blueprint for improving America's economy, political theorist Reich delivers a brilliant reading of the economic crisis and how Americans should deal with its aftermath.

Synopsis:

A brilliant new reading of the economic crisis—and a plan for dealing with the challenge of its aftermath—by one of our most trenchant and informed experts.

When the nations economy foundered in 2008, blame was directed almost universally at Wall Street. But Robert B. Reich suggests a different reason for the meltdown, and for a perilous road ahead. He argues that the real problem is structural: it lies in the increasing concentration of income and wealth at the top, and in a middle class that has had to go deeply into debt to maintain a decent standard of living.

Persuasively and straightforwardly, Reich reveals how precarious our situation still is. The last time in American history when wealth was so highly concentrated at the top—indeed, when the top 1 percent of the population was paid 23 percent of the nations income—was in 1928, just before the Great Depression. Such a disparity leads to ever greater booms followed by ever deeper busts.

Reichs thoughtful and detailed account of where we are headed over the next decades reveals the essential truth about our economy that is driving our politics and shaping our future. With keen insight, he shows us how the middle class lacks enough purchasing power to buy what the economy can produce and has adopted coping mechanisms that have a negative impact on their quality of life; how the rich use their increasing wealth to speculate; and how an angrier politics emerges as more Americans conclude that the game is rigged for the benefit of a few. Unless this trend is reversed, the Great Recession will only be repeated.

Reichs assessment of what must be done to reverse course and ensure that prosperity is widely shared represents the path to a necessary and long-overdue transformation. Aftershock is a practical, humane, and much-needed blueprint for both restoring Americas economy and rebuilding our society.

Video

About the Author

Robert B. Reich is professor of public policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. He has served in three national administrations, most recently as secretary of labor under President Bill Clinton, and was an economic advisor to President Obama. His articles have appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal. He lives in Berkeley.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

immparts, September 29, 2010 (view all comments by immparts)
Mr. Reich has taken a unique look at the macro causes of this latest Recession/Depression. Simply put, he is absolutely correct. My company is a Machine Tool Builder, or at least was. The 1970's were reasonably good years for the Machine Tool Industry. Then came Ronald Regan in the 1980's. When Mr. Regan came into office there were over 500 members of the National Machine Tool Builders Association. When he left office there were less than 50 members remaining. With that limited membership, the NMTBA disbanded. Manufacturing was moving offshore at a dizzying pace. The scandal of that time was the failure of government (Republican) to provide for and plan for new opportunities for the displaced workers. This, at a time when women were entering the workforce in record numbers. Then as Mr Reich correctly observes, technology (computerized operations) began displacing additional workers even as more persons were entering the workforce. Then began the mergers of financial institutions, the abandonment of any restraint of compensation demanded by CEO's and their ilk. All this while cutting workforces. Then, of course, we saw the banks driving up real estate values to support greater lending, even though much of it was totally irresponsible. The banks caused this run on real estate and the resultant inflation of real estate values, all of which was unsupported by any real underlying value. Finally, the collapse of Iceland shouted the folly of Wall Street. And now, we all know what happened to the citizens of the United States as well. This was a slow moving freight train coming down the track and the politicians, Wall Street, the Banks and Insurance Companies failed to comprehend or care about the magnitude of the impending disaster they themselves had caused.

The solutions? I doubt I have listed any that most Americans do not already want.
1. All Executive compensation in public companies should be subject to shareholder
approval, period!
2. The top wage earners should pay their fair share of taxes. Period!
3. We must encourage manufacturing to re-establish in the United States now!
4. We must encourage more research and development in the U.S. now!
5. We must rebuild our infastructure now!
6. We must improve the educational system in the U.S. Especially math and science.
7. We need to address the illegal worker problem we ourselves created.
8. We need to limit the concentration of wealth in banks, Wall Street and
Insurance companies to ensure a more competitive enviornment.

These problems have been identified long before my comments. Mr. Reich has put the problems and solutions in perspective. We now need only to implement the solutions, which we all agree are needed, to ensure all U.S. citizens will have continued opportunitity and prosperity.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(7 of 10 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307592811
Subtitle:
The Next Economy and America's Future
Author:
Reich, Robert B.
Publisher:
Knopf
Subject:
Economics - General
Subject:
General Current Events
Subject:
Economic Conditions
Subject:
Politics - General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20100921
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
2 DIAGRAMS TO BE REDRAWN
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
9.5 x 5.9 x .8 in .86 lb

Other books you might like

  1. How to Live Safely in a Science...
    Used Trade Paper $10.50
  2. Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada's... Used Trade Paper $6.95
  3. Gold Boy, Emerald Girl
    Used Hardcover $10.50
  4. The Last Illusion (Molly Murphy... Used Hardcover $4.50
  5. The Year of the Flood
    Used Hardcover $6.95

Related Subjects

Featured Titles » History and Social Science
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Economics » US Economy
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Future Studies

Aftershock: The Next Economy and America's Future Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 192 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780307592811 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Reich (Supercapitalism), secretary of labor under Bill Clinton and former economic adviser to President Obama, argues that Obama's stimulus package will not catalyze real recovery because it fails to address 40 years of increasing income inequality. The lessons are in the roots of and responses to the Great Depression, according to Reich, who compares the speculation frenzies of the 1920s — 1930s with present-day ones, while showing how Keynesian forerunners like FDR's Federal Reserve Board chair, Marriner Eccles, diagnosed wealth disparity as the leading stress leading up to the Depression. By contrast, sharing the gains of an expanding economy with the middle class brought unprecedented prosperity in the postwar decades, as the majority of workers earned enough to buy what they produced. Despite occasional muddled analyses (of the offshoring of industrial production in the 1990s, for example), Reich's thesis is well argued and frighteningly plausible: without a return to the 'basic bargain' (that workers are also consumers), the 'aftershock' of the Great Recession includes long-term high unemployment and a political backlash — a crisis, he notes with a sort of grim optimism, that just might be painful enough to encourage necessary structural reforms. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Review" by , "Former Secretary of Labor Reich...argues that America will not have a sustained economic recovery until the middle class has more buying power.... Lucid and cogent."
"Review" by , "Ensured a current-events hearing by his public prominence, Reich may find his readership defined by those in tune with his short tracts expansionist view of government."
"Synopsis" by , A brilliant reading of the economic crisis and how we should deal with its aftermath.

When the nation’s economy foundered in 2008, blame was almost universally directed at Wall Street. But celebrated economic policy maker and political theorist Robert B. Reich suggests a different reason for the meltdown, and for a potentially treacherous road ahead. Reich argues that the real problem is structural: it lies in the increasing concentration of income and wealth at the top — and a middle class that had to go deeply into debt to maintain a decent standard of living.

His thoughtful and detailed account of where we are headed over the next decades reveals the essential truth about our economy that is driving our politics and shaping our future. His assessment of what must be done to ensure that prosperity is widely shared — a much broader safety net for the middle class to be financed by higher marginal tax rates on the very wealthy — heralds a necessary and long-overdue transformation.

Here is a practical, humane, and much-needed blueprint for lastingly improving America’s economy.

"Synopsis" by , Offering a much-needed blueprint for improving America's economy, political theorist Reich delivers a brilliant reading of the economic crisis and how Americans should deal with its aftermath.
"Synopsis" by , A brilliant new reading of the economic crisis—and a plan for dealing with the challenge of its aftermath—by one of our most trenchant and informed experts.

When the nations economy foundered in 2008, blame was directed almost universally at Wall Street. But Robert B. Reich suggests a different reason for the meltdown, and for a perilous road ahead. He argues that the real problem is structural: it lies in the increasing concentration of income and wealth at the top, and in a middle class that has had to go deeply into debt to maintain a decent standard of living.

Persuasively and straightforwardly, Reich reveals how precarious our situation still is. The last time in American history when wealth was so highly concentrated at the top—indeed, when the top 1 percent of the population was paid 23 percent of the nations income—was in 1928, just before the Great Depression. Such a disparity leads to ever greater booms followed by ever deeper busts.

Reichs thoughtful and detailed account of where we are headed over the next decades reveals the essential truth about our economy that is driving our politics and shaping our future. With keen insight, he shows us how the middle class lacks enough purchasing power to buy what the economy can produce and has adopted coping mechanisms that have a negative impact on their quality of life; how the rich use their increasing wealth to speculate; and how an angrier politics emerges as more Americans conclude that the game is rigged for the benefit of a few. Unless this trend is reversed, the Great Recession will only be repeated.

Reichs assessment of what must be done to reverse course and ensure that prosperity is widely shared represents the path to a necessary and long-overdue transformation. Aftershock is a practical, humane, and much-needed blueprint for both restoring Americas economy and rebuilding our society.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.