Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Best Books of the Year | December 7, 2014

    Gigi Little: IMG Best Kids' Books of 2014



    No, I'm sorry, it's impossible. The best kids' books of 2014? The best? Can't do it. There have been entirely too many exceptional examples of the... Continue »
    1. $11.87 Sale Board Book add to wish list

      Countablock

      Christopher Franceschelli and Peskimo 9781419713743

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$25.00
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
7 Remote Warehouse Cooking and Food- Culinary Reference

Ideas in Food: Great Recipes and Why They Work

by

Ideas in Food: Great Recipes and Why They Work Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

No-Knead Brioche Dough

Makes two 9 x 5-inch loaves

 

Good brioche is an amazing thing. The bread is light, buttery, and full

of flavor. It can be somewhat labor intensive in its original form, so we

were immediately intrigued by the idea of creating a no-knead version.

Normally the butter is beaten into the dough, but here we melt it and

add it to the wet ingredients. The long resting period allows it to be

fully absorbed into the dough without all that extra work. This may

seem like a large recipe, but the dough can be used to make various

sweet breads like the sticky bun recipe that follows, and the plain loaves

freeze beautifully.

 

6 ½ cups/975 grams all-purpose flour

½ cup/100 grams sugar

3 ½ teaspoons/20 grams fine sea salt

½ teaspoon/2 grams instant yeast

8 large eggs

1 cup/230 grams room-temperature water

½ cup/135 grams milk

1 pound/450 grams unsalted butter, melted and cooled

Milk or heavy cream for brushing the loaves

 

Combine the flour, sugar, salt, and yeast in a large bowl. Whisk to

thoroughly blend.

 

In a separate bowl whisk together the eggs, water, and milk. Once

they are well blended, whisk in the butter. Pour the wet ingredients

into the dry mixture and stir with a rubber spatula or wooden spoon

until the liquid is absorbed and there are no lumps. The mixture will

resemble muffin batter. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let it

rise at room temperature for 3 to 4 hours. The dough will rise to

approximately one and a half times its initial volume.

 

Using a rubber spatula, gently loosen the dough from the bowl.

Dampen your hands with cool water and, with the dough still in the

bowl, slide one hand under one side of the dough. Fold that side of the

dough into the center and press down gently so the dough adheres to

itself. Give the bowl a quarter turn and repeat the folding process. Do

this two more times. After the fourth fold, flip over the dough so the

seams are on the bottom. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let it

rise at room temperature for 8 to 12 hours. The dough will double in

size.

 

Repeat the folding procedure, ending with the seams on the bottomn.

The dough is now ready to use.

 

To Bake the Brioche

Divide the dough in half. Place each half in a greased 9 × 5-inch

loaf pan. (You can also bake half and reserve half for the sticky bun

recipe that follows.) Cover the pans with a towel or plastic wrap. Let

the dough rest in the pans while you preheat the oven to 375oF

(190°C) or 350oF (175°C) with convection.

 

Brush the loaves with milk and bake on the middle rack of the

oven for 1 hour. The loaves are done when they are a deep golden

brown and sound hollow when tapped firmly with your finger. Cool

for 10 minutes in the pan on a wire rack. Turn the loaves out of their

pans and return them to the rack to cool completely.

Review:

"Though it's not an all-purpose cookbook, this volume by Kamozawa and Talbot, the Ideas in Food bloggers and 'Kitchen Alchemy' columnists for Popular Science, could easily be an everyday reference tool and a source of go-to recipes for anyone who spends a lot of time in the kitchen. The authors break down the science behind correctly and deliciously preparing everything from bread, pasta, and eggs (including soft scrambled eggs; hard-boiled eggs, and brown butter hollandaise sauce) to homemade butter and yogurt. Most recipes fall into the 'Ideas for Everyone' category, which composes about the first three-quarters of the book; the final section is 'Ideas for Professionals,' which explores trendy molecular gastronomy topics like liquid nitrogen--used to make popcorn gelato--and carbon dioxide, a necessary tool for making coffee onion rings. Straightforward prose and anecdotes with personality keep this from being a dry food science tome. And accessible recipes for such dishes as a simple roast chicken, green beans almondine, and root beer-braised short ribs mean it never gets too lofty. (Dec.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

Husband-and-wife duo Talbot and Kamozawa are this generation's hip young guides to the hows and whys of cooking, which they explain in 50 entertaining essays and then put into practice with 75 recipes for avid cooks to try at home.

Synopsis:

Alex Talbot and Aki Kamozawa, husband-and-wife chefs and the forces behind the popular blog Ideas in Food, have made a living out of being inquisitive in the kitchen. Their book shares the knowledge they have gleaned from numerous cooking adventures, from why tapioca flour makes a silkier chocolate pudding than the traditional cornstarch or flour to how to cold smoke just about any ingredient you can think of to impart a new savory dimension to everyday dishes. Perfect for anyone who loves food, Ideas in Food is the ideal handbook for unleashing creativity, intensifying flavors, and pushing one’s cooking to new heights.

 

This guide, which includes 100 recipes, explores questions both simple and complex to find the best way to make food as delicious as possible. For home cooks, Aki and Alex look at everyday ingredients and techniques in new ways—from toasting dried pasta to lend a deeper, richer taste to a simple weeknight dinner to making quick “micro stocks” or even using water to intensify the flavor of soups instead of turning to long-simmered stocks. In the book’s second part, Aki and Alex explore topics, such as working with liquid nitrogen and carbon dioxide—techniques that are geared towards professional cooks but interesting and instructive for passionate foodies as well. With primers and detailed usage guides for the pantry staples of molecular gastronomy, such as transglutaminase and hydrocolloids (from xanthan gum to gellan), Ideas in Food informs readers how these ingredients can transform food in miraculous ways when used properly.

 

Throughout, Aki and Alex show how to apply their findings in unique and appealing recipes such as Potato Chip Pasta, Root Beer-Braised Short Ribs, and Gingerbread Soufflé. With Ideas in Food, anyone curious about food will find revelatory information, surprising techniques, and helpful tools for cooking more cleverly and creatively at home. 

 

About the Author

AKI KAMOZAWA and H. ALEXANDER TALBOT met in the kitchen at Clio in Boston in 1997 and have been cooking together ever since. They own Ideas in Food, a consulting business based in Levittown, Pennsylvania, and have worked with individual chefs as well as with companies such as No. 9 Group in Boston, Fourth Wall Restaurants in New York City, Frito Lay, and Unilever. Their company grew out of their Ideas in Food blog, which they started in 2004. Together they wrote an online column called “Kitchen Alchemy” for Popular Science. Visit them at www.ideasinfood.com

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307717405
Author:
Kamozawa, Aki
Publisher:
Clarkson Potter Publishers
Author:
Talbot, H. Alexander
Author:
Talbot, Alexander H.
Subject:
General Cooking
Subject:
General
Subject:
Cookery
Subject:
Chemistry
Subject:
Reference
Subject:
Culinary Arts & Techniques
Subject:
Cooking and Food-General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20101231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
25 LINE DRAWINGS
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.54 x 5.73 x 1.08 in .94 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Bitters: A Spirited History of a... New Hardcover $24.99
  2. The Food52 Cookbook: 140 Winning... New Hardcover $35.00
  3. Good Fish: Sustainable Seafood... Used Trade Paper $18.95
  4. Jellymongers: Glow-In-The-Dark... Sale Hardcover $8.98
  5. Tartine Bread
    New Hardcover $40.00

Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » General
Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » General
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General
History and Social Science » Military » General History

Ideas in Food: Great Recipes and Why They Work New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$25.00 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Clarkson N Potter Publishers - English 9780307717405 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Though it's not an all-purpose cookbook, this volume by Kamozawa and Talbot, the Ideas in Food bloggers and 'Kitchen Alchemy' columnists for Popular Science, could easily be an everyday reference tool and a source of go-to recipes for anyone who spends a lot of time in the kitchen. The authors break down the science behind correctly and deliciously preparing everything from bread, pasta, and eggs (including soft scrambled eggs; hard-boiled eggs, and brown butter hollandaise sauce) to homemade butter and yogurt. Most recipes fall into the 'Ideas for Everyone' category, which composes about the first three-quarters of the book; the final section is 'Ideas for Professionals,' which explores trendy molecular gastronomy topics like liquid nitrogen--used to make popcorn gelato--and carbon dioxide, a necessary tool for making coffee onion rings. Straightforward prose and anecdotes with personality keep this from being a dry food science tome. And accessible recipes for such dishes as a simple roast chicken, green beans almondine, and root beer-braised short ribs mean it never gets too lofty. (Dec.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , Husband-and-wife duo Talbot and Kamozawa are this generation's hip young guides to the hows and whys of cooking, which they explain in 50 entertaining essays and then put into practice with 75 recipes for avid cooks to try at home.
"Synopsis" by , Alex Talbot and Aki Kamozawa, husband-and-wife chefs and the forces behind the popular blog Ideas in Food, have made a living out of being inquisitive in the kitchen. Their book shares the knowledge they have gleaned from numerous cooking adventures, from why tapioca flour makes a silkier chocolate pudding than the traditional cornstarch or flour to how to cold smoke just about any ingredient you can think of to impart a new savory dimension to everyday dishes. Perfect for anyone who loves food, Ideas in Food is the ideal handbook for unleashing creativity, intensifying flavors, and pushing one’s cooking to new heights.

 

This guide, which includes 100 recipes, explores questions both simple and complex to find the best way to make food as delicious as possible. For home cooks, Aki and Alex look at everyday ingredients and techniques in new ways—from toasting dried pasta to lend a deeper, richer taste to a simple weeknight dinner to making quick “micro stocks” or even using water to intensify the flavor of soups instead of turning to long-simmered stocks. In the book’s second part, Aki and Alex explore topics, such as working with liquid nitrogen and carbon dioxide—techniques that are geared towards professional cooks but interesting and instructive for passionate foodies as well. With primers and detailed usage guides for the pantry staples of molecular gastronomy, such as transglutaminase and hydrocolloids (from xanthan gum to gellan), Ideas in Food informs readers how these ingredients can transform food in miraculous ways when used properly.

 

Throughout, Aki and Alex show how to apply their findings in unique and appealing recipes such as Potato Chip Pasta, Root Beer-Braised Short Ribs, and Gingerbread Soufflé. With Ideas in Food, anyone curious about food will find revelatory information, surprising techniques, and helpful tools for cooking more cleverly and creatively at home. 

 

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.