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What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean?

by

What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean? Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

What did the internment of Japanese Americans mean? This underexamined episode of World War II history affected more than 120,000 Japanese Americans who were removed and confined in sixteen camps throughout the western half of the United States. Authorized by Executive Order 9066, the internment established a legal precedent that has never been overturned. How was the decision justified at the time? These five selections, challenging conventional interpretations, help readers investigate the meaning of the internment. Written by historians who have helped expand the record and alter responses to the internment, the readings examine topics that range from the U.S. government's role in planning and carrying out the removal to the ways in which Japanese Americans, resident aliens, and foreign nationals coped with and resisted it. These interpretive writings show the complexity and continuing consequences of a controversial moment in 20th century American history.

Synopsis:

During World War II, over 120,000 Japanese Americans were removed and confined for four years in sixteen camps located throughout the western half of the United States. Yet the internment of Japanese Americans in concentration camps remains a largely unknown episode of World War II history. Indeed, many of the internees themselves do not wish to speak of it, even to their own family members. In these selections, Alice Yang Murray invites students to investigate this event and to review and challenge the conventional interpretations of its significance. The selections explore the U.S. government's role in planning and carrying out the removal and internment of thousands of citizens, resident aliens, and foreign nationals, and the ways in which Japanese Americans coped with or resisted their removal and incarceration.

About the Author

ALICE YANG MURRAY is assistant professor of history at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She has published articles on the history of the internment, oral history, and the history of Asian American women. She is currently completing a manuscript entitled Better Americans in a Greater America: Japanese American Internment, Redress, and Historical Memory.

Table of Contents

  Foreword

  Preface

  A Note for Students

    

PART I. INTRODUCTION

    

  The Internment of Japanese Americans

    From Pearl Harbor to Mass Incarceration: A Brief Narrative

    The Internment Camps

    Historians and Internment: From Relocation Centers to Concentration

    Camps

    

PART II. SOME CURRENT QUESTIONS

    

  1. Why were Japanese Americans interned during World War II?

    Roger Daniels, The Decision for Mass Evacuation

    

  2. What caused the Supreme Court to affirm the constitutionality of internment?

    Peter Irons, Gordon Hirabayashi v. United States: A Jap's a Jap

    

  3. Why did U.S. officials intern people of Japanese ancestry from Central and South America?

    Michi Weglyn, Hostages

    

  4. How did some Japanese Americans resist internment?

    Gary Y. Okihiro, Tule Lake under Martial Law: A Study of Japanese Resistance

    

  5. What was the impact of internment on Japanese American families and communities?

    Valerie J. Matsumoto, Amache

    

  Making Connections

  Suggestions for Further Reading

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312208295
Author:
Murray, Alice Yang (edt)
Publisher:
Bedford Books
Selected by:
Daniels, Roger
Selected by:
Irons, Peter H.
Selected:
Daniels, Roger
Selected:
Irons, Peter H.
Author:
Murray, Alice Yang
Subject:
General History
Subject:
World war, 1939-1945
Subject:
Japanese Americans
Subject:
Military - World War II
Subject:
United States Ethnic relations.
Subject:
Military-World War II General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Historians at Work
Publication Date:
20000431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
162
Dimensions:
9.18 x 6.05 x 0.35 in

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Related Subjects

» History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Asian American
» History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Japanese American
» History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
» History and Social Science » US History » General
» History and Social Science » World History » General
» Religion » Comparative Religion » General

What Did the Internment of Japanese Americans Mean? Used Trade Paper
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Product details 162 pages MACMILLAN PUBLISHING SERVICES - English 9780312208295 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
During World War II, over 120,000 Japanese Americans were removed and confined for four years in sixteen camps located throughout the western half of the United States. Yet the internment of Japanese Americans in concentration camps remains a largely unknown episode of World War II history. Indeed, many of the internees themselves do not wish to speak of it, even to their own family members. In these selections, Alice Yang Murray invites students to investigate this event and to review and challenge the conventional interpretations of its significance. The selections explore the U.S. government's role in planning and carrying out the removal and internment of thousands of citizens, resident aliens, and foreign nationals, and the ways in which Japanese Americans coped with or resisted their removal and incarceration.
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