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1 Burnside Film and Television- Ethnicity and Gender

Complicated Women: Sex and Power in Pre-Code Hollywood

by

Complicated Women: Sex and Power in Pre-Code Hollywood Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Between 1929 and 1934, women in American cinema were modern! For five short years women in American cinema were modern! They took lovers, had babies out of wedlock, got rid of cheating husbands, enjoyed their sexuality, led unapologetic careers and, in general, acted the way many think women only acted after 1968.

Before then, women on screen had come in two varieties - good or bad - sweet ingenue or vamp. Then two stars came along to blast away these common stereotypes. Garbo turned the femme fatale into a woman whose capacity for love and sacrifice made all other human emotions seem pale. Meanwhile, Norma Shearer succeeded in taking the ingenue to a place she'd never been: the bedroom. Garbo and Shearer took the stereotypes and made them complicated.

In the wake of these complicated women came others, a deluge of indelible stars - Constance Bennett, Ruth Chatterton, Mae Clarke, Claudette Colbert, Marlene Dietrich, Kay Francis, Ann Harding, Jean Harlow, Miriam Hopkins, Dorothy Mackaill, Barbara Stanywyck, Mae West and Loretta Young all came into their own during the pre-Code era. These women pushed the limits and shaped their images along modern lines.

Then, in July 1934, the draconian Production Code became the law in Hollywood and these modern women of the screen were banished, not to be seen again until the code was repealed three decades later.

Mick LaSalle, film critic for the San Francisco Chronicle, takes readers on a tour of pre-Code films and reveals how this was the true golden age of women's films and how the movies of the pre-Code are still worth watching. The bold, pioneering and complicated women of the pre-Code era are about to take their place in the pantheon of film history, and America is about to reclaim a rich legacy.

Synopsis:

Between 1929 and 1934, women of the silver screen took lovers, had babies out of wedlock, and did other things considered amoral at the time. A film critic for the "San Francisco Chronicle" celebrates what he calls the golden age of women in film and discusses how it was quashed by the draconian Production Code of 1934. photo insert.

Synopsis:

In the pre-Code Hollywood era, between 1929 and 1934, women in American cinema took lovers, had babies out of wedlock, got rid of cheating husbands, enjoyed their sexuality, led unapologetic careers, and, in general, acted the way many think women only acted after 1968.

Before then, women on screen had come in two varieties-sweet ingenue or vamp. Then two stars came along: Greta Garbo, who turned the femme fatale into a woman whose capacity for love and sacrifice made all other human emotions seem pale; and Norma Shearer, who succeeded in taking the ingenue to a place she'd never been: the bedroom. In their wake came a deluge of other complicated women-Marlene Dietrich, Jean Harlow, and Mae West, to name a few. Then, in July 1934, the draconian Production Code became the law in Hollywood and these modern women of the screen were banished, not to be seen again until the code was repealed three decades later.

A thorough survey and a tribute to these films, Complicated Women reveals how this was the true Golden Age of women's films.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [273]-279) and index.

About the Author

Mick LaSalle is the film critic for the San Francisco Chronicle and teaches a class at University of California at Berkeley on pre-Code film. He lives in San Francisco.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312252076
Subtitle:
Sex and Power in Pre-Code Hollywood
Author:
Lasalle, Mick
Publisher:
St. Martin's Griffin
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Women's Studies
Subject:
Film - History & Criticism
Subject:
Women's Studies - History
Subject:
Women in motion pictures
Subject:
Film - General
Subject:
Film
Subject:
Video - Reference
Subject:
Film & Video - Reference
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Publication Date:
20011219
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Plus one 32-page bandw photo insert
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9.3 x 6.23 x 0.785 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Ethnicity and Gender

Complicated Women: Sex and Power in Pre-Code Hollywood Used Hardcover
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$15.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages St. Martin's Press - English 9780312252076 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Between 1929 and 1934, women of the silver screen took lovers, had babies out of wedlock, and did other things considered amoral at the time. A film critic for the "San Francisco Chronicle" celebrates what he calls the golden age of women in film and discusses how it was quashed by the draconian Production Code of 1934. photo insert.
"Synopsis" by ,
In the pre-Code Hollywood era, between 1929 and 1934, women in American cinema took lovers, had babies out of wedlock, got rid of cheating husbands, enjoyed their sexuality, led unapologetic careers, and, in general, acted the way many think women only acted after 1968.

Before then, women on screen had come in two varieties-sweet ingenue or vamp. Then two stars came along: Greta Garbo, who turned the femme fatale into a woman whose capacity for love and sacrifice made all other human emotions seem pale; and Norma Shearer, who succeeded in taking the ingenue to a place she'd never been: the bedroom. In their wake came a deluge of other complicated women-Marlene Dietrich, Jean Harlow, and Mae West, to name a few. Then, in July 1934, the draconian Production Code became the law in Hollywood and these modern women of the screen were banished, not to be seen again until the code was repealed three decades later.

A thorough survey and a tribute to these films, Complicated Women reveals how this was the true Golden Age of women's films.

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