Summer Reading B2G1 Free
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | July 14, 2015

    Joshua Mohr: IMG Your Imagination, Your Fingerprint



    When I was in grad school, a teacher told our workshop that if a published novel is 300 pages, the writer had to generate 1,200 along the way. I... Continue »
    1. $17.50 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

      All This Life

      Joshua Mohr 9781593766030

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$4.50
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Environmental Studies- Food and Famine

Dinner at the New Gene Cafe: How Genetic Engineering Is Changing What We Eat, How We Live, and the Global Politics of Food

by

Dinner at the New Gene Cafe: How Genetic Engineering Is Changing What We Eat, How We Live, and the Global Politics of Food Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Biotech companies are racing to alter the genetic building blocks of the world's food. In the United States, the primary venue for this quiet revolution, the acreage of genetically modified crops has soared from zero to 70 million acres since 1996. More than half of America's processed grocery products-from cornflakes to granola bars to diet drinks-contain gene-altered ingredients. But the U.S., unlike Europe and other democratic nations, does not require labeling of modified food. Dinner at the New Gene Café expertly lays out the battle lines of the impending collision between a powerful but unproved technology and a gathering resistance from people worried about the safety of genetic change.

Bill Lambrecht writes about environment and natural resource issues for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. His journalism prizes include three Raymond Clapper Awards for Washington Reporting, one of them in 1999 for his articles on genetic engineering around the world. He lives in Fairhaven, Maryland.

With a new Afterword by the author. Recent headlines will tell you that biotechonology companies are knocking down barriers as they race one another to alter the genetic building blocks of the world's food. In the United States, the primary venue for this quiet revolution, the acreage of genetically modified crops has soared from zero to more than 70 million acres since 1996. More than half of America's processed grocery productsfrom cornflakes to granola bars to diet drinkscontain gene-altered ingredients. But the U.S., unlike Europe and other democratic nations, does not require labeling of modified food. Resistance to this technology is growing fast and furioussometimes even violent.

Dinner at the New Gene Café lays out the battle lines of the impending collision between a powerful but unproved technology and a gathering resistance from people worried about the safety of genetic change and the power of those who own the technology. Amid the furor, this precocious science is cutting applications of dangerous insecticides, and the next wave of modified crops could deliver more nutritious foodeven food that wards off disease. But even before people weigh the potential costs and benefits, this Mendelian magic is thrusting itself on the world in Orwellian fashion.

Journalist Bill Lambrecht has watched the technology from its inception and traveled the world to witness its introduction. Timely and important, Dinner at the New Gene Café examines the growing international struggle over a matter that is vital to everyone on the planet: the very nature of our food, who shall shape our food supply, and who shall own it.

"Lambrecht's work on this vital topic not only led the rest of the world media, but also gave government leaders in many countries their first clue of what was happening within their borders . . . His style of reporting and writing not only vividly explains this complex topic to the reader, but he does it with color and background that makes the book a great read."Andrew Schneider, Senior National Correspondent, Seattle Post-Intelligencer

"Lambrecht's work on this vital topic not only led the rest of the world media, but also gave government leaders in many countries their first clue of what was happening within their borders . . . His style of reporting and writing not only vividly explains this complex topic to the reader, but he does it with color and background that makes the book a great read."Andrew Schneider, Senior National Correspondent, Seattle Post-Intelligencer

"Lambrecht does a terrific job humanizing this story . . . This is a fine work by a journalist who knows his subject."Chicago Tribune

"Gives both sides of the issue a fair, informative, sympathetic and often fascinating hearing."The Vancouver Sun

"The first great story of the new century, and Bill Lambrecht owns it. At the juncture of science and politics, he reports and writes with unmodified purity."Richard Ben Cramer, author of Joe DiMaggio: The Hero's Life and What It Takes: The Way to the White House

"Dinner at the New Gene Café gives consumers, farmers, and environmentalists plenty of food for thought about the need to take food policy control away from the corporate profiteers."Jim Hightower, author of If the Gods Had Meant Us to Vote They Would Have Given Us Candidates

"Stunningly comprehensive and intensely absorbing. Should be required reading for anyone who eats."Kirkus Reviews (starred)

"Genetically modified food has mobilized intense, fearful, anticapitalist, and antiglobalist opposition, especially in the past three years, when the most visible developer of this type of food, Monsanto in St. Louis, has tried to export its products to Europe. This report by a St. Louis Post-Dispatch writer covers in detail the company's research into the genetic engineering of plants, the reception of its new products among several farmers in Illinois, and the public-relations and political battles that swirled around 'Frankenfood,' to use its critics' pejorative. Lambrecht also writes about the reactions of advocacy groups, both business associations supporting genetically modified food and the constellation of self-avowed environmental groups opposing it. He then reports on the studies, international conferences, regulatory decisions, and occasional acts of vandalism that have taken place. An inquisitive, evenhanded work by a knowledgeable journalist, this puts the cacophony of generally negative headlines about the subject into perspective."Gilbert Taylor, Booklist

"This book captures the mystery, potentials, and perils of modified genes in mankind's food chain. It's a thriller. It's genetic yin and yang. It's reporting from across the globe by a superb political and environmental journalist. And it may change your life."Neal Peirce

"Lambrecht takes what could be a dry topic and dishes out a great read for those who wonderor worrywhat this brave new world is likely to yield."The Washington Post

"If we are what we eat, everyone should be concerned about the story Lambrecht tells."Larry King

"An indispensable history of the political storm surrounding GMOs . . . This book's greatest asset is the firsthand testimony it gives from every side of the debate."Publishers Weekly

"Genetically engineered food, commonly referred to as genetically modified organisms (GMOs), is the subject of this study by Lambrecht, a reporter for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. He describes the issues raised by advocates and detractors, with reports from the United States, Canada, Ireland, France, Britain, Switzerland, India, Colombia, and other countries. Supporters believe that biotechnology is the answer to feeding the world with safe and nutritious foods that are resistant to insect and disease damage, profitable for farmers, and vital for developing sustainable farming systems. Opponents, on the other hand, claim that GMOs pose health and environmental threats and demand mandatory labeling. (Some have resorted to violence and crop destruction to gain recognition.) The role of Monsanto, the major player in launching the food biotechnology crusade worldwide, is stressed throughout. Those seeking a better understanding of food biotechnology and its ramifications should read this work."Irwin Weintraub, Brooklyn College Library, New York, Library Journal

Synopsis:

Biotech companies are racing to alter the genetic building blocks of the world's food. In the United States, the primary venue for this quiet revolution, the acreage of genetically modified crops has soared from zero to 70 million acres since 1996. More than half of America's processed grocery products-from cornflakes to granola bars to diet drinks-contain gene-altered ingredients. But the U.S., unlike Europe and other democratic nations, does not require labeling of modified food. Dinner at the New Gene Café expertly lays out the battle lines of the impending collision between a powerful but unproved technology and a gathering resistance from people worried about the safety of genetic change.

About the Author

Bill Lambrecht writes about environment and natural resource issues for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. His journalism prizes include three Raymond Clapper Awards for Washington Reporting, one of them in 1999 for his articles on genetic engineering around the world. He lives in Fairhaven, Maryland.

Table of Contents

Foreword — Part one : New gene cafe — On opening day, fields of dreams ; Plantings one ; In the beginning... ; Cry9 shame : when the rules broke down ; Plantings two ; New gene cafe ; Wings of a butterfly : Martina versus Margaret ; Plantings three — Part two : On the pharm — In Illinois, an apostle of modified food ; Terminator ; Plantings four ; Organic cornucopia in the garden of Glickman ; Ice cream with Earl ; Plantings five ; Pigs of Chez Panisse ; Genes of the jungle ; Plantings six — Part three : Backlash — In Ireland, beets of wrath ; In France, democracy European style ; Plantings seven ; In Britain, absolutely unstoppable ; What went wrong? ; Plantings eight ; In cyberspace, technologies converge ; In India, a fatal connection ; Plantings nine ; Biotech and the paradox of plenty — Part four : Coming to grips — Colombia : rising voices in a troubled land ; Plantings ten ; Battle of Seattle ; Montreal : last stop on the GMO trail ; Plantings eleven.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312302634
Author:
Lambrecht, Bill
Publisher:
St. Martin's Griffin
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Ethics
Subject:
Public opinion
Subject:
Safety
Subject:
Biotechnology
Subject:
Genetic engineering
Subject:
Food industry
Subject:
Genetically modified foods
Subject:
General Current Events
Subject:
General Current Events
Subject:
Food, Genetically Modified
Subject:
Politics - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series Volume:
9-02
Publication Date:
20021231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes 20 black-and-white photographs
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

Other books you might like

  1. Mad Cowboy: Plain Truth from the... Used Trade Paper $3.50
  2. Eating in the Dark: America's... Used Hardcover $8.50
  3. Beyond Recycling: A Re-User's Guide:... New Trade Paper $14.95
  4. The Newman's Own Organics Guide to... Used Trade Paper $2.50
  5. Complete Vegetarian Cuisine Used Trade Paper $3.50
  6. Long Walk to Freedom: The...
    Used Trade Paper $7.95

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Safety » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Reference » Science Reference » Technology
Science and Mathematics » Biology » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Genetics
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Food and Famine

Dinner at the New Gene Cafe: How Genetic Engineering Is Changing What We Eat, How We Live, and the Global Politics of Food Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.50 In Stock
Product details 400 pages St. Martin's Griffin - English 9780312302634 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Biotech companies are racing to alter the genetic building blocks of the world's food. In the United States, the primary venue for this quiet revolution, the acreage of genetically modified crops has soared from zero to 70 million acres since 1996. More than half of America's processed grocery products-from cornflakes to granola bars to diet drinks-contain gene-altered ingredients. But the U.S., unlike Europe and other democratic nations, does not require labeling of modified food. Dinner at the New Gene Café expertly lays out the battle lines of the impending collision between a powerful but unproved technology and a gathering resistance from people worried about the safety of genetic change.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.