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This title in other editions

Home of the Brave

by

Home of the Brave Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Kek comes from Africa.

In America, he sees the snow for the first time, and feels its sting. Hes never walked on ice, and he falls. He wonders if the people in this new place will be like the winter—cold and unkind.

            In Africa, Kek lived with his mother, father, and brother. But only he and his mother have survived, and now shes missing. Kek is on his own. Slowly, he makes friends: a girl who is in foster care, and old woman who owns a rundown farm, and a cow whose name means “family” in his native language. As Kek awaits word of his mothers fate, he weathers the tough Minnesota winter by finding warmth in his few friendships, strength in his memories, and belief in his new country.

            Bestselling author Katherine Applegate presents a beautifully wrought novel about an immigrants journey from hardship to hope.

 

Katherine Applegate is the author of several bestselling series, including Animorphs, as well as The Buffalo Storm, a picture book.

            Home of the Brave is Katherine Applegates first stand-alone novel. “In Keks story, I hope readers will see the neighbor child with a strange accent, the new kid in class from some faraway land, the child in odd clothes who doesnt belong,” she says. “I hope they see themselves.”

            Ms. Applegate lives with her family in North Carolina.

Review:

"In her first stand-alone book, Applegate (the Animorphs series) effectively uses free verse to capture a Sudanese refugee's impressions of America and his slow adjustment. After witnessing the murders of his father and brother, then getting separated from his mother in an African camp, Kek alone believes that his mother has somehow survived. The boy has traveled by 'flying boat' to Minnesota in winter to live with relatives who fled earlier. An onslaught of new sensations greets Kek ('This cold is like claws on my skin,' he laments), and ordinary sights unexpectedly fill him with longing (a lone cow in a field reminds him of his father's herd; when he looks in his aunt's face, 'I see my mother's eyes/ looking back at me'). Prefaced by an African proverb, each section of the book marks a stage in the narrator's assimilation, eloquently conveying how his initial confusion fades as survival skills improve and friendships take root. Kek endures a mixture of failures (he uses the clothes washer to clean dishes) and victories (he lands his first paying job), but one thing remains constant: his ardent desire to learn his mother's fate. Precise, highly accessible language evokes a wide range of emotions and simultaneously tells an initiation story. A memorable inside view of an outsider. Ages 10-14. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

A deeply poetic and affecting novel about the contemporary immigrant experience.

Synopsis:

A man I helped to settle here

taught me a saying from Africa.

Ill bet you would like it:

A cow is God with a wet nose.

Kek comes from Africa where he lived with his mother, father, and brother. But only he and his mother have survived. Now shes missing, and Kek has been sent to a new home. In America, he sees snow for the first time, and feels its sting. He wonders if the people in this new place will be like the winter—cold and unkind. But slowly he makes friends: a girl in foster care, an old woman with a rundown farm, and a sweet, sad cow that reminds Kek of home. As he waits for word of his mothers fate, Kek weathers the tough Minnesota winter by finding warmth in his new friendships, strength in his memories, and belief in his new country.

Synopsis:

The author of the bestselling Animorphs series (written under the name K.A. Applegate) delivers her first stand-alone literary novel: a beautifully wrought story about an African immigrant to America, who makes a journey from hardship to hope.

About the Author

Katherine Applegate is the author of several bestselling series, including Animorphs, as well as the picture book, The Buffalo Storm (Clarion).

Home of the Brave is Katherine Applegate’s first standalone novel. “In Kek’s story, I hope readers will see the neighbor child with a strange accent, the new kid in class from some faraway land, the child in odd clothes who doesn’t belong,” she says. “I hope they will see themselves.”

Ms. Applegate lives with her family in North Carolina.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Kenda Willey, July 17, 2009 (view all comments by Kenda Willey)
A beautiful book, written in a sparing, evocative style that will appeal to all ages (although it definitely is a kids' book), not just the targeted middle-schoolers. It's a short read, and the free verse is quiet and simple, yet full of fervent meaning. One story among many about persons subject to physical abuse in their own countries and political abuse here. It warmed my heart without pathos.
I will read it with my 10-year-old this summer, and with my high school special-ed students in the fall. I can hardly wait to hear what they have to say about it!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
crowyhead, December 9, 2008 (view all comments by crowyhead)
Kek, a young teen refugee from Sudan, is overjoyed to be reunited with his aunt and cousin in Minnesota. The world is alien, though; cold and white, and he misses his brother, mother, and father. He witnesses the deaths of his brother and father, but clings to the hope that his mother may have survived. He is lonely and confused, but gradually begins to adapt to his new world, finding solace in family, new friends, and a job caring for an elderly cow.

I was only aware of Katherine Applegate through her work on the voluminous Animorphs series, so I was pleasantly surprised by this book. The story is told entirely in free verse, which allows Applegate to evoke feelings and impressions in a way that might seem contrived in more straightforward prose. By the end of the book, the reader really feels that they have lived inside Kek's head for a time, and felt what he feels. The ending of the book struck me as a slightly contrived happy ending, but I was unwilling to begrudge Kek his happiness, and others will likely feel the same way.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)
kaahumanu, August 23, 2008 (view all comments by kaahumanu)
My daughter will be teaching 'Home of the Brave' to her 4th and 5th grade class this year. She recommended this slim volume to me after she took a class on teaching this book. I love this book. If you know a child, this would make a great present. Katherine Applegate's prose is like reading a written tone poem.

I have many favorite parts, but this is my most favorite:
"You can have your dogs and cats,
your gerbils and hamsters
and sleek sparkling fish,
But you will have lived
just half a life
if you never love a cow."
You have to read the book to appreciate this lovely sentiment.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(8 of 11 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312367657
Author:
Applegate, Katherine
Publisher:
Feiwel & Friends
Subject:
General
Subject:
People & Places - Africa
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
Immigrants
Subject:
Schools
Subject:
Social Issues - Emigration & Immigration
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Emigration and Immigration
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Subject:
Family/General (see also headings under Social Issues)
Edition Description:
Middle-Grade Fiction
Publication Date:
20070831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 5 up to 9
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
7.61 x 5.2 x 0.72 in
Age Level:
10-14

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Emigration and Immigration
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » New Experience

Home of the Brave New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Feiwel & Friends - English 9780312367657 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In her first stand-alone book, Applegate (the Animorphs series) effectively uses free verse to capture a Sudanese refugee's impressions of America and his slow adjustment. After witnessing the murders of his father and brother, then getting separated from his mother in an African camp, Kek alone believes that his mother has somehow survived. The boy has traveled by 'flying boat' to Minnesota in winter to live with relatives who fled earlier. An onslaught of new sensations greets Kek ('This cold is like claws on my skin,' he laments), and ordinary sights unexpectedly fill him with longing (a lone cow in a field reminds him of his father's herd; when he looks in his aunt's face, 'I see my mother's eyes/ looking back at me'). Prefaced by an African proverb, each section of the book marks a stage in the narrator's assimilation, eloquently conveying how his initial confusion fades as survival skills improve and friendships take root. Kek endures a mixture of failures (he uses the clothes washer to clean dishes) and victories (he lands his first paying job), but one thing remains constant: his ardent desire to learn his mother's fate. Precise, highly accessible language evokes a wide range of emotions and simultaneously tells an initiation story. A memorable inside view of an outsider. Ages 10-14. (Sept.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
A deeply poetic and affecting novel about the contemporary immigrant experience.
"Synopsis" by ,
A man I helped to settle here

taught me a saying from Africa.

Ill bet you would like it:

A cow is God with a wet nose.

Kek comes from Africa where he lived with his mother, father, and brother. But only he and his mother have survived. Now shes missing, and Kek has been sent to a new home. In America, he sees snow for the first time, and feels its sting. He wonders if the people in this new place will be like the winter—cold and unkind. But slowly he makes friends: a girl in foster care, an old woman with a rundown farm, and a sweet, sad cow that reminds Kek of home. As he waits for word of his mothers fate, Kek weathers the tough Minnesota winter by finding warmth in his new friendships, strength in his memories, and belief in his new country.

"Synopsis" by , The author of the bestselling Animorphs series (written under the name K.A. Applegate) delivers her first stand-alone literary novel: a beautifully wrought story about an African immigrant to America, who makes a journey from hardship to hope.
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