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1 Burnside - Bldg. 2 Environmental Studies- General

The Fate of Nature: Rediscovering Our Ability to Rescue the Earth

by

The Fate of Nature: Rediscovering Our Ability to Rescue the Earth Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

What capacity for good lies in the hidden depths of people?

Starting with this question, award-winning author Charles Wohlforth sets forth on a wide-ranging exploration of our relationship with the world. In The Fate of Nature, he draws on science, spirituality, history, economics, and personal stories to reveal answers about the future of that relationship.

There is no better place to witness the highs and lows of our treatment of the natural world than the vast wilds, rocky coasts, and shifting settlements of Alaska. Since the first encounter between Captain Cook's crew and the Alaskan Natives in 1778, there have been countless struggles between people who have had different plans for the region. Some have hoped to preserve Alaska as they found it, while others aimed to create something new in its place.

Incidents such as the Exxon Valdez oil spill may seem like cause for despair. In the face of such profound tragedies, Charles Wohlforth has found heartening developments in the science of human altruism. This new understanding of what causes humans to cooperate and act conscientiously may be the first step toward taking the actions necessary to preserve an environment that has already been altered drastically in our lifetime.

A clear-eyed, original work of research, reportage, and philosophical reflections, The Fate of Nature gives us a chance to change the way we think about our place in society and the world at large.

Review:

"Inclusive, complex, and resolute, Wohlforth's environmental history is rich in newly mined facts, galvanizing interpretations, and shocking disclosures. By analyzing competition and evolution, culture and economics, habits of living and of mind, science and suffering, Wohlforth brings a truly ecological perspective to the global debate over how to protect the biosphere." Booklist (starred review)

Review:

"An immense book that confronts the biggest question we'll ever face: Do we humans have it in us to square with nature before it's too late?" Alan Weisman, author of The World Without Us

Review:

"The Fate of Nature is an important and compelling read. Wohlforth develops critical, unexamined issues about our relationship to nature through the vivid characters and magnificent landscapes of coastal Alaska. You'll be intrigued, and you may be changed." Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

Review:

“The great question — to be settled in the next few decades — is whether 'human nature' will force us to wreck our planet, or whether it will turn out to be the saving grace. Charles Wohlforth doesn't make assumptions — he makes sense. And hopeful sense at that!" Bill McKibben, author of Deep Economy

Review:

"An ambitious and big-hearted book, The Fate of Nature contains lessons we all need to learn. It should be read by everyone who cares about the oceans and the many lives — human or otherwise — that depend on them." Elizabeth Kolbert, author of Field Notes from a Catastrophe

Synopsis:

The Fate of Nature considers the burgeoning science of human nature and behavior, using Alaska as a starting point to explore mankind's capacity to save the planet from environmental decline. Map.

Synopsis:

“What capacity for good lies in the hidden depths of people?”

Starting with this question, award-winning author Charles Wohlforth sets forth on a wide-ranging exploration of our relationship with the world. In The Fate of Nature, he draws on science, spirituality, history, economics, and personal stories to reveal answers about the future of that relationship.

There is no better place to witness the highs and lows of our treatment of the natural world than the vast wilds, rocky coasts, and shifting settlements of Alaska.  Since the first encounter between Captain Cook's crew and the Alaskan Natives in 1778, there have been countless struggles between people who have had different plans for the region. Some have hoped to preserve Alaska as they found it, while others aimed to create something new in its place.

Incidents such as the Exxon Valdez oil spill may seem like cause for despair. In the face of such profound tragedies, Charles Wohlforth has found heartening developments in the science of human altruism. This new understanding of what causes humans to cooperate and act conscientiously may be the first step toward taking the actions necessary to preserve an environment that has already been altered drastically in our lifetime.

A clear-eyed, original work of research, reportage, and philosophical reflections, The Fate of Nature gives us a chance to change the way we think about our place in society and the world at large.

Synopsis:

The Fate of Nature  is a profoundly relevant call to action from journalist Charles Wohlforth, whose award-winning reportage addressed the infamous 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. In the wake of the tragic 2010 BP disaster, Wohlforth's voice has never been more necessary. Using as a stage coastal Alaska, populated by an array of odd and inspiring characters, he presents both an insightful assessment of our present state and a hopeful vision for our planet in his “thoughtful and felicitous new book . . . an inspired view of humankind's future” (Anchorage Daily News).

About the Author

Charles Wohlforth is a lifelong Alaska resident and author of The Whale and the Supercomputer, winner of the L.A. Times Book Prize, as well as many other books and articles about nature, history, politics, and travel in the North. An avid cross-country skier, Wohlforth lives during the winter in Anchorage with his wife, Barbara, and their four children. In summer they live off the grid on a remote Kachemak Bay shore reachable only by boat. Wohforth began his career as a reporter for a small-town newspaper. As a reporter for the Anchorage Daily News, he worked months in the field covering the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

Learn more online at www.fateofnature.com.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312377373
Subtitle:
Rediscovering Our Ability to Rescue the Earth
Author:
Wohlforth, Charles
Publisher:
Picador
Subject:
History
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection - General
Subject:
Human Geography
Subject:
Environmental Conservation
Subject:
Protection
Subject:
Human ecology
Subject:
Natural history -- Alaska.
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection
Subject:
Environmental Studies-Environment
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20110329
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes one map
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

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Related Subjects

Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » General

The Fate of Nature: Rediscovering Our Ability to Rescue the Earth Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$19.50 In Stock
Product details 448 pages Thomas Dunne Books - English 9780312377373 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Inclusive, complex, and resolute, Wohlforth's environmental history is rich in newly mined facts, galvanizing interpretations, and shocking disclosures. By analyzing competition and evolution, culture and economics, habits of living and of mind, science and suffering, Wohlforth brings a truly ecological perspective to the global debate over how to protect the biosphere."
"Review" by , "An immense book that confronts the biggest question we'll ever face: Do we humans have it in us to square with nature before it's too late?"
"Review" by , "The Fate of Nature is an important and compelling read. Wohlforth develops critical, unexamined issues about our relationship to nature through the vivid characters and magnificent landscapes of coastal Alaska. You'll be intrigued, and you may be changed."
"Review" by , “The great question — to be settled in the next few decades — is whether 'human nature' will force us to wreck our planet, or whether it will turn out to be the saving grace. Charles Wohlforth doesn't make assumptions — he makes sense. And hopeful sense at that!"
"Review" by , "An ambitious and big-hearted book, The Fate of Nature contains lessons we all need to learn. It should be read by everyone who cares about the oceans and the many lives — human or otherwise — that depend on them."
"Synopsis" by , The Fate of Nature considers the burgeoning science of human nature and behavior, using Alaska as a starting point to explore mankind's capacity to save the planet from environmental decline. Map.
"Synopsis" by ,

“What capacity for good lies in the hidden depths of people?”

Starting with this question, award-winning author Charles Wohlforth sets forth on a wide-ranging exploration of our relationship with the world. In The Fate of Nature, he draws on science, spirituality, history, economics, and personal stories to reveal answers about the future of that relationship.

There is no better place to witness the highs and lows of our treatment of the natural world than the vast wilds, rocky coasts, and shifting settlements of Alaska.  Since the first encounter between Captain Cook's crew and the Alaskan Natives in 1778, there have been countless struggles between people who have had different plans for the region. Some have hoped to preserve Alaska as they found it, while others aimed to create something new in its place.

Incidents such as the Exxon Valdez oil spill may seem like cause for despair. In the face of such profound tragedies, Charles Wohlforth has found heartening developments in the science of human altruism. This new understanding of what causes humans to cooperate and act conscientiously may be the first step toward taking the actions necessary to preserve an environment that has already been altered drastically in our lifetime.

A clear-eyed, original work of research, reportage, and philosophical reflections, The Fate of Nature gives us a chance to change the way we think about our place in society and the world at large.

"Synopsis" by ,
The Fate of Nature  is a profoundly relevant call to action from journalist Charles Wohlforth, whose award-winning reportage addressed the infamous 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. In the wake of the tragic 2010 BP disaster, Wohlforth's voice has never been more necessary. Using as a stage coastal Alaska, populated by an array of odd and inspiring characters, he presents both an insightful assessment of our present state and a hopeful vision for our planet in his “thoughtful and felicitous new book . . . an inspired view of humankind's future” (Anchorage Daily News).
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