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Positively Fifth Street: Murderers, Cheetahs, and Binion's World Series of Poker

by

Positively Fifth Street: Murderers, Cheetahs, and Binion's World Series of Poker Cover

ISBN13: 9780312422523
ISBN10: 0312422520
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

Staff Pick

This book is the Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil of high stakes poker. Author James McManus used his Harper's advance money to immerse himself into tournament poker. The result is an engrossing and bizarre account of Las Vegas gambling. Go ahead and admit it — you watch the World Poker Tour. Raise your bid and read this book.
Recommended by Danielle, Powells.com

Review-A-Day

"I found the author's writing about the tournament heart-stoppingly dramatic, as brilliant as anything ever written about poker. And while his coverage of the Binion trial feels less compelling, less fought-for, Positively Fifth Street, like Sin City itself, is an endlessly fascinating spectacle." Adrienne Miller, Esquire (read the entire Esquire review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the spring of 2000, Harper's Magazine sent James McManus to Las Vegas to cover the World Series of Poker, in particular the progress of women in the $23 million event, and the murder of Ted Binion, the tournament's prodigal host, purportedly done in by a stripper and her boyfriend. But when McManus arrives, the lure of the tables compels him to risk his entire Harper's advance in a long-shot attempt to play in the tournament himself. This is his deliciously suspenseful account of the tournament — the players, the hand-to-hand combat, his own unlikely progress in it — and the delightfully seedy carnival atmosphere that surrounds it. Positively Fifth Street is a high-stakes adventure and a terrifying but often hilarious account of one man's effort to understand what Edward O. Wilson has called "Pleistocene exigencies" — the eros and logistics of our competitive instincts.

Review:

"McManus has crafted one of the finest books ever written on poker, gambling and murder. There is hardly an aspect of the gambling life that he doesn't honestly examine." Kim I. Eisler, Washington Post

Review:

"Positively Fifth Street — nonfiction though it is — may be the closest thing to a true Beat novel we've seen since Kesey went back to dairy farming, Tom Robbins started going for too many easy laughs, and Thomas Pynchon fell silent again." Gerald Nicosia, Los Angeles Times

Review:

"The drama of high-stakes poker is inherently compelling — here is a rare opportunity to read an account by someone who can really write." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Beware this book. Jim McManus portrays a Vegas that most of us don't believe ever really existed — seedy and thrilling and deadly — and his poker scenes rank with the most exciting sports writing you'll ever find. I'd never even heard of Texas hold'em when I first read his blow-by-blow account of how far he made it — as an amateur! — in the World Series of Poker. Now, because of him, I'm hooked on the game." Ira Glass, host of This American Life

Review:

"Murder, sex, drugs, Sylvia Plath, Amarillo Slim, the history of cards, the psychology of gambling, and most insistently the edgy drama of no-limit Texas hold'em — it's all here in language that nearly burns a hole in the page." Billy Collins, U.S. Poet Laureate

Review:

"Chasing after the great big epic of the U.S.A., McManus finds at the poker table a reflection of just about everything that matters: love, money, violence, resentment, envy, fear. Positively Fifth Street is a love story, really, and just the far side of gonzo, too, with the tranquilized reporter following his dream right into the story — like the kid at the natural history museum who crawled inside the diorama." Rich Cohen, author of Lake Effect

Review:

"Very entertaining and very accurate." David Sklansky, author of The Theory of Poker

Review:

"Most fascinating is his portrait of the customs and sensibilities of the eclectic homo pokereins across every race and nationality, male and female (including a very aggressive barefoot and pregnant professional poker player). A delicious inside look." Vanessa Bush, Booklist

Review:

"Irresistible...McManus gives the reader a riveting over-the-shoulder view of the hand-by-hand action....His prose is flashy, funny, and unexpectedly erudite, but McManus hardly even needs it — with material this rich, he's holding the writer's equivalent of a royal flush." Time

Review:

"James McManus bet big and won. His Positively Fifth Street, an exhilarating chronicle of the 2000 World Series of Poker in Las Vegas, will go on the shelf with the classic that inspired it, The Biggest Game in Town, A. Alvarez's account of the 1981 event." Robert R. Harris, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Though the language of poker can be as obtuse as haiku, McManus uses it to dazzle the reader....A heart-in-its-mouth card story: urgent, potent, and damn jolly." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

Positively Fifth Street is a high-stakes adventure, and a terrifying but often hilarious account of one man's effort to understand what Edward O. Wilson has called "Pleistocene exigencies" — the eros and logistics of our primary competitive instincts.

Synopsis:

In the spring of 2000, Harper's Magazine sent James McManus to Las Vegas to cover the World Series of Poker, in particular the progress of women in the $23 million event, and the murder of Ted Binion, the tournament's prodigal host, purportedly done in by a stripper and her boyfriend. But when McManus arrives, the lure of the tables compels him to risk his entire Harper's advance in a long-shot attempt to play in the tournament himself. This is his deliciously suspenseful account of the tournament--the players, the hand-to-hand combat, his own unlikely progress in it--and the delightfully seedy carnival atmosphere that surrounds it. Positively Fifth Street is a high-stakes adventure and a terrifying but often hilarious account of one man's effort to understand what Edward O. Wilson has called "Pleistocene exigencies"--the eros and logistics of our competitive instincts.

James McManus is the author of four novels, including Going to the Sun, winner of the Carl Sandburg Award. In 2001 he received the Peter Lisagor Award for sports journalism. His writing appears in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Esquire, Chicago, and Harper's, and has been widely anthologized. He teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, including a course on the literature and science of poker.

In the Spring of 2000, Harper's Magazine sent James McManus to Las Vegas to cover the World Series of Pokerin particular, the mushrooming progress of women in the $23 million event, and the murder of Ted Binion, the tournament's prodigal host, purportedly done in by a stripper and her boyfriend with a technique so outré it took a Manhattan pathologist to identify it. Whether a jury would convict the attractive young couple was another story altogether.

But when McManus sets foot in town, the lure of the tables is too strong: he proceeds to risk his entire Harper's advance in a long-shot attempt to play in the tournament himself. Only with actual experience at the table (he tells his skeptical wife) can he capture the hair-raising subtleties of the kind of poker that determines the world champion. The heart of the book is his deliciously suspenseful account of the tournament itselfthe players, the hands, and his own unlikely progress in it.

Written in the tradition of The Gambler and The Biggest Game in Town, Positively Fifth Street is a high-stake adventure, and a terrifying but often hilarious account of one man's effort to understand what Edward O. Wilson has called "Pleistocene exigencies"the eros and logistics of our primary competitive instincts.

"Sex, drugs, Sylvia Plath, Amarillo Slim, the history of cards, the psychology of gambling, and most insistently the edgy drama of no-limit Texas hold'emit's all here in language that nearly burns a hole in the page."Billy Collins, U.S. Poet Laureate

"James McManus bet big and won. His Positively Fifth Street, an exhilarating chronicle of the 2000 World Series of Poker in Las Vegas, will go on the shelf with the classic that inspired it, The Biggest Game in Town, A. Alvarez's account of the 1981 event . . . As tension packed as any thriller . . . A great story."The New York Times Book Review (cover)

"Artfully woven . . . McManus captures the adrenaline-juiced tension of the game, and he also captures the anomalous mix of skill, bravado, gamesmanship, and sheer good fortune that a player needs to succeed; the bantering rivalry and comraderie that engulf the survivors; and the knowledge, as Conrad once put it, that 'it is the mark of an inexperienced man not to believe in luck.'"Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

"Irresistible . . . McManus gives the reader a riveting over-the-shoulder view of the hand-by-hand action . . . His prose is flashy, funny, and unexpectedly erudite, but McManus hardly even needs itwith material this rich, he's holding the writer's equivalent of a royal flush."Time

"In writing about poker Jim McManus has managed to write about everything, and it's glorious."David Sedaris, author of Me Talk Pretty One Day

"A long run of luck. It takes guts to write a book like this, to reveal yourself in three dimensions, to stand as hero and fool."Chicago Tribune

"Beware this book. Jim McManus portrays a Vegas that most of us don't believe ever really existedseedy and thrilling and deadlyand his poker scenes rank with the most exciting sports writing you'll ever find. I'd never even heard of Texas Hold 'Em when I first read his blow-by-blow account of how he won a quarter million dollarsas an amateur!in the World Series of Poker. Now, because of him, I'm hooked on the game."Ira Glass, host of This American Life

"Irresistible . . . A joy to read . . . McManus dances poetlike amid stores of knowledge from every conceivable field and somehow ties them all together."Gerald Nicosia, Los Angeles Times

"A rich and raunchy memoir, a Las Vegas fable of no-limit action."Sports Illustrated

"A tension-filled shot of adrenaline . . . gloriously depraved . . . This is a real-life Clark Kent matching wits with poker's superheroes and emerging triumphant."Newsday

"What makes [McManus's writing] compelling is its empathy . . . Beyond being the most authentic account of the World Series of Poker, Positively Fifth Street is an elegant explanation of why people . . . are drawn to risk."The Wall Street Journal

"James McManus is the only literary poker-player ever to have made it to the final table in 'the Big One,' and he did so by playing brilliantly. I admire his achievement, envy his skill and discipline, and was completely absorbed by his subtle, detailed, lively account of the longest four days of his life."A. Alvarez, author of The Biggest Game in Town

"Compelling . . . as close as you can get to a Vegas table without risking your bankroll."New York magazine

"Although this is not a book by which to learn poker, it contains some of the most profound poker wisdom a player is likely to learn . . . A riveting and humorous emotional roller coaster." The Washington Post Book World

"Many have tried, myself included, but no writer before Jim McManus has made it to the final table of the 'Big One' at the World Series of Poker. It's the equivalent of NASA sending a poet to the moonand the resulting book is just as enthralling."Anthony Holden, author of Big Deal: One Year as a Professional Poker Player

"I was present during the events McManus describes in glorious detail. At the time, I didn't know how a man with McManus's relatively limited tournament experience could perform at such a high level. Seeing the courage he displays in Positively Fifth Street by baring ALL elements of his experience, including the negative ones, I know now that it wasn't just luck and good play that got him to the final table. James McManus has nerves of steel (or iron balls, as you prefer), and you will find yourself unable to put down [this] compelling true tale."Andrew N. S. Glazer, Detroit Free Press

"Chasing after the great big epic of the USA, McManus finds at the poker table a reflection of just about everything that matters: love, money, violence, resentment, envy, fear. Positively Fifth Street is a love story, really, and just the far side of gonzo, too, with the tranquillized reporter following his dream right into the story-like the kid at the Natural History Museum who crawled inside the diorama."Rich Cohen, author of Lake Effect

"A straight flush . . . The drama of high-stakes poker is inherently compellinghere is a rare opportunity to read an account by someone who can really write."Publishers Weekly

Synopsis:

In the spring of 2000, Harper's Magazine sent James McManus to Las Vegas to cover the World Series of Poker, in particular the progress of women in the $23 million event, and the murder of Ted Binion, the tournament's prodigal host, purportedly done in by a stripper and her boyfriend. But when McManus arrives, the lure of the tables compels him to risk his entire Harper's advance in a long-shot attempt to play in the tournament himself. This is his deliciously suspenseful account of the tournament--the players, the hand-to-hand combat, his own unlikely progress in it--and the delightfully seedy carnival atmosphere that surrounds it. Positively Fifth Street is a high-stakes adventure and a terrifying but often hilarious account of one man's effort to understand what Edward O. Wilson has called "Pleistocene exigencies"--the eros and logistics of our competitive instincts.

About the Author

James McManus is a novelist and poet, most recently winner of the Peter Lisagor Award for sports journalism. He teaches writing and comparative literature at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, including a course on the literature and science of poker.

Table of Contents

The End 3
Dead Money 21
Family, Career, Even Life 35
Black Magic 69
Urge Overkill 87
The Poker of Science 107
Nobody Said Anything 125
Chicks with Decks 149
Death in the Afternoon 185
Book-learned 207
On the Bubble 223
Song for Two Jims 249
Tension-discharge 269
The Last Supper 311
Either Way 337
Zombies is Bawth of 'Em 355
Tons and Tons of Luck 369
Poker Terminology 389
Bibliography 399
Acknowledgments 405
Index 407

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Dr. Rico, July 6, 2007 (view all comments by Dr. Rico)
McManus is a good player and an even better writer. Unlike many amateurs who sit down at the Big Game, McManus is a touchingly vulnerable protagonist. He knows he really shouldn't be spending the money to enter the tournament, because it could cover several months of his family's expenses; he knows that most of his competitors are better players than he is, including T.J. Cloutier, who literally wrote the book on tournament poker (well, co-wrote it; McManus says he used Cloutier's book as a textbook); and he knows just how big a part luck plays in winning a big tournament. His self-doubts make him a better hero. McManus interweaves his story with the true-crime tale of the death of gambling heir Ted Binion, but the Binion material pales beside the compelling account of his journey to the final table of the World Series of Poker.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(5 of 10 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312422523
Author:
McManus, James
Publisher:
Picador USA
Subject:
Popular Culture
Subject:
Sports Psychology
Subject:
Gambling - Card Games
Subject:
Asia - India & South Asia
Subject:
Popular Culture - General
Subject:
General Sports & Recreation
Subject:
Murder - General
Subject:
Card Games - Poker
Subject:
Gambling - General
Subject:
Games-Card Games - Poker
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st paperback ed.
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
March 1, 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes 17 halftones
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
8.29 x 6.4 x 0.845 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Crime » True Crime
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Games » Card Games » Poker
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Games » Gambling » General
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Games » Miscellaneous Games
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Sports Psychology

Positively Fifth Street: Murderers, Cheetahs, and Binion's World Series of Poker Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 448 pages Picador USA - English 9780312422523 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

This book is the Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil of high stakes poker. Author James McManus used his Harper's advance money to immerse himself into tournament poker. The result is an engrossing and bizarre account of Las Vegas gambling. Go ahead and admit it — you watch the World Poker Tour. Raise your bid and read this book.

"Review A Day" by , "I found the author's writing about the tournament heart-stoppingly dramatic, as brilliant as anything ever written about poker. And while his coverage of the Binion trial feels less compelling, less fought-for, Positively Fifth Street, like Sin City itself, is an endlessly fascinating spectacle." (read the entire Esquire review)
"Review" by , "McManus has crafted one of the finest books ever written on poker, gambling and murder. There is hardly an aspect of the gambling life that he doesn't honestly examine."
"Review" by , "Positively Fifth Street — nonfiction though it is — may be the closest thing to a true Beat novel we've seen since Kesey went back to dairy farming, Tom Robbins started going for too many easy laughs, and Thomas Pynchon fell silent again."
"Review" by , "The drama of high-stakes poker is inherently compelling — here is a rare opportunity to read an account by someone who can really write."
"Review" by , "Beware this book. Jim McManus portrays a Vegas that most of us don't believe ever really existed — seedy and thrilling and deadly — and his poker scenes rank with the most exciting sports writing you'll ever find. I'd never even heard of Texas hold'em when I first read his blow-by-blow account of how far he made it — as an amateur! — in the World Series of Poker. Now, because of him, I'm hooked on the game."
"Review" by , "Murder, sex, drugs, Sylvia Plath, Amarillo Slim, the history of cards, the psychology of gambling, and most insistently the edgy drama of no-limit Texas hold'em — it's all here in language that nearly burns a hole in the page."
"Review" by , "Chasing after the great big epic of the U.S.A., McManus finds at the poker table a reflection of just about everything that matters: love, money, violence, resentment, envy, fear. Positively Fifth Street is a love story, really, and just the far side of gonzo, too, with the tranquilized reporter following his dream right into the story — like the kid at the natural history museum who crawled inside the diorama."
"Review" by , "Very entertaining and very accurate."
"Review" by , "Most fascinating is his portrait of the customs and sensibilities of the eclectic homo pokereins across every race and nationality, male and female (including a very aggressive barefoot and pregnant professional poker player). A delicious inside look."
"Review" by , "Irresistible...McManus gives the reader a riveting over-the-shoulder view of the hand-by-hand action....His prose is flashy, funny, and unexpectedly erudite, but McManus hardly even needs it — with material this rich, he's holding the writer's equivalent of a royal flush."
"Review" by , "James McManus bet big and won. His Positively Fifth Street, an exhilarating chronicle of the 2000 World Series of Poker in Las Vegas, will go on the shelf with the classic that inspired it, The Biggest Game in Town, A. Alvarez's account of the 1981 event."
"Review" by , "Though the language of poker can be as obtuse as haiku, McManus uses it to dazzle the reader....A heart-in-its-mouth card story: urgent, potent, and damn jolly."
"Synopsis" by , Positively Fifth Street is a high-stakes adventure, and a terrifying but often hilarious account of one man's effort to understand what Edward O. Wilson has called "Pleistocene exigencies" — the eros and logistics of our primary competitive instincts.
"Synopsis" by ,
In the spring of 2000, Harper's Magazine sent James McManus to Las Vegas to cover the World Series of Poker, in particular the progress of women in the $23 million event, and the murder of Ted Binion, the tournament's prodigal host, purportedly done in by a stripper and her boyfriend. But when McManus arrives, the lure of the tables compels him to risk his entire Harper's advance in a long-shot attempt to play in the tournament himself. This is his deliciously suspenseful account of the tournament--the players, the hand-to-hand combat, his own unlikely progress in it--and the delightfully seedy carnival atmosphere that surrounds it. Positively Fifth Street is a high-stakes adventure and a terrifying but often hilarious account of one man's effort to understand what Edward O. Wilson has called "Pleistocene exigencies"--the eros and logistics of our competitive instincts.

James McManus is the author of four novels, including Going to the Sun, winner of the Carl Sandburg Award. In 2001 he received the Peter Lisagor Award for sports journalism. His writing appears in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Esquire, Chicago, and Harper's, and has been widely anthologized. He teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, including a course on the literature and science of poker.

In the Spring of 2000, Harper's Magazine sent James McManus to Las Vegas to cover the World Series of Pokerin particular, the mushrooming progress of women in the $23 million event, and the murder of Ted Binion, the tournament's prodigal host, purportedly done in by a stripper and her boyfriend with a technique so outré it took a Manhattan pathologist to identify it. Whether a jury would convict the attractive young couple was another story altogether.

But when McManus sets foot in town, the lure of the tables is too strong: he proceeds to risk his entire Harper's advance in a long-shot attempt to play in the tournament himself. Only with actual experience at the table (he tells his skeptical wife) can he capture the hair-raising subtleties of the kind of poker that determines the world champion. The heart of the book is his deliciously suspenseful account of the tournament itselfthe players, the hands, and his own unlikely progress in it.

Written in the tradition of The Gambler and The Biggest Game in Town, Positively Fifth Street is a high-stake adventure, and a terrifying but often hilarious account of one man's effort to understand what Edward O. Wilson has called "Pleistocene exigencies"the eros and logistics of our primary competitive instincts.

"Sex, drugs, Sylvia Plath, Amarillo Slim, the history of cards, the psychology of gambling, and most insistently the edgy drama of no-limit Texas hold'emit's all here in language that nearly burns a hole in the page."Billy Collins, U.S. Poet Laureate

"James McManus bet big and won. His Positively Fifth Street, an exhilarating chronicle of the 2000 World Series of Poker in Las Vegas, will go on the shelf with the classic that inspired it, The Biggest Game in Town, A. Alvarez's account of the 1981 event . . . As tension packed as any thriller . . . A great story."The New York Times Book Review (cover)

"Artfully woven . . . McManus captures the adrenaline-juiced tension of the game, and he also captures the anomalous mix of skill, bravado, gamesmanship, and sheer good fortune that a player needs to succeed; the bantering rivalry and comraderie that engulf the survivors; and the knowledge, as Conrad once put it, that 'it is the mark of an inexperienced man not to believe in luck.'"Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

"Irresistible . . . McManus gives the reader a riveting over-the-shoulder view of the hand-by-hand action . . . His prose is flashy, funny, and unexpectedly erudite, but McManus hardly even needs itwith material this rich, he's holding the writer's equivalent of a royal flush."Time

"In writing about poker Jim McManus has managed to write about everything, and it's glorious."David Sedaris, author of Me Talk Pretty One Day

"A long run of luck. It takes guts to write a book like this, to reveal yourself in three dimensions, to stand as hero and fool."Chicago Tribune

"Beware this book. Jim McManus portrays a Vegas that most of us don't believe ever really existedseedy and thrilling and deadlyand his poker scenes rank with the most exciting sports writing you'll ever find. I'd never even heard of Texas Hold 'Em when I first read his blow-by-blow account of how he won a quarter million dollarsas an amateur!in the World Series of Poker. Now, because of him, I'm hooked on the game."Ira Glass, host of This American Life

"Irresistible . . . A joy to read . . . McManus dances poetlike amid stores of knowledge from every conceivable field and somehow ties them all together."Gerald Nicosia, Los Angeles Times

"A rich and raunchy memoir, a Las Vegas fable of no-limit action."Sports Illustrated

"A tension-filled shot of adrenaline . . . gloriously depraved . . . This is a real-life Clark Kent matching wits with poker's superheroes and emerging triumphant."Newsday

"What makes [McManus's writing] compelling is its empathy . . . Beyond being the most authentic account of the World Series of Poker, Positively Fifth Street is an elegant explanation of why people . . . are drawn to risk."The Wall Street Journal

"James McManus is the only literary poker-player ever to have made it to the final table in 'the Big One,' and he did so by playing brilliantly. I admire his achievement, envy his skill and discipline, and was completely absorbed by his subtle, detailed, lively account of the longest four days of his life."A. Alvarez, author of The Biggest Game in Town

"Compelling . . . as close as you can get to a Vegas table without risking your bankroll."New York magazine

"Although this is not a book by which to learn poker, it contains some of the most profound poker wisdom a player is likely to learn . . . A riveting and humorous emotional roller coaster." The Washington Post Book World

"Many have tried, myself included, but no writer before Jim McManus has made it to the final table of the 'Big One' at the World Series of Poker. It's the equivalent of NASA sending a poet to the moonand the resulting book is just as enthralling."Anthony Holden, author of Big Deal: One Year as a Professional Poker Player

"I was present during the events McManus describes in glorious detail. At the time, I didn't know how a man with McManus's relatively limited tournament experience could perform at such a high level. Seeing the courage he displays in Positively Fifth Street by baring ALL elements of his experience, including the negative ones, I know now that it wasn't just luck and good play that got him to the final table. James McManus has nerves of steel (or iron balls, as you prefer), and you will find yourself unable to put down [this] compelling true tale."Andrew N. S. Glazer, Detroit Free Press

"Chasing after the great big epic of the USA, McManus finds at the poker table a reflection of just about everything that matters: love, money, violence, resentment, envy, fear. Positively Fifth Street is a love story, really, and just the far side of gonzo, too, with the tranquillized reporter following his dream right into the story-like the kid at the Natural History Museum who crawled inside the diorama."Rich Cohen, author of Lake Effect

"A straight flush . . . The drama of high-stakes poker is inherently compellinghere is a rare opportunity to read an account by someone who can really write."Publishers Weekly

"Synopsis" by ,
In the spring of 2000, Harper's Magazine sent James McManus to Las Vegas to cover the World Series of Poker, in particular the progress of women in the $23 million event, and the murder of Ted Binion, the tournament's prodigal host, purportedly done in by a stripper and her boyfriend. But when McManus arrives, the lure of the tables compels him to risk his entire Harper's advance in a long-shot attempt to play in the tournament himself. This is his deliciously suspenseful account of the tournament--the players, the hand-to-hand combat, his own unlikely progress in it--and the delightfully seedy carnival atmosphere that surrounds it. Positively Fifth Street is a high-stakes adventure and a terrifying but often hilarious account of one man's effort to understand what Edward O. Wilson has called "Pleistocene exigencies"--the eros and logistics of our competitive instincts.

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