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Past Imperfect

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Past Imperfect Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From the creator of the Emmy Award-winning Downton Abbey...
 
“Damian Baxter was a friend of mine at Cambridge. We met around the time when I was doing the Season at the end of the Sixties. I introduced him to some of the girls. They took him up, and we ran about together in London for a while….”

Nearly forty years later, the narrator hates Damian Baxter and would gladly forget their disastrous last encounter. But if it is pleasant to hear from an old friend, it is more interesting to hear from an old enemy, and so he accepts an invitation from the rich and dying Damian, who begs him to track down the past girlfriend whose anonymous letter claimed he had fathered a child during that ruinous debutante season.

The search takes the narrator back to the extraordinary world of swinging London, where aristocratic parents schemed to find suitable matches for their daughters while someone was putting hash in the brownies at a ball at Madame Tussauds. It was a time when everything seemed to be changing—and it was, but not always quite as expected.
 
Past Imperfect is Julian Fellowes at his best--a novel of secrets, status, and a world in upheaval.

Review:

"A middle-aged Londoner is forced to revisit his past in Fellowes's slick and dexterous second novel (after the bestselling Snobs). Former friend Damian Baxter, after 40 years of estrangement, convinces the unnamed narrator to locate the woman Damian believes to have borne his child in 1968. As the narrator looks back on the events of that fateful summer, Fellowes exercises his considerable talent for observing the nuances of custom and class distinction. Especially interesting are the frequent digressions to consider the peculiar juncture of their 'safe little, nearly-pre-1939 world' with the Swinging Sixties. In the narrator's circle of friends-who would fit comfortably into a Trollope novel-the ossified conventions of the upper class still hold sway, yet the '60s make an appearance as well, enlivening a debutante party with surprise hash brownies. We quickly discover that middle-class Damian (a 'social mountaineer') managed to insinuate himself into this smart set until a terrible scene tears apart the group of friends. Deservedly compared to Tom Wolfe, Fellowes, with his ability to document the aristocracy with a sociologist's eye, fashions intriguing narratives." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Wishing to track down a past girlfriend who claims he had fathered her child, the rich and dying Damian Baxter contacts an old friend from his days at Cambridge. The search takes the narrator back to 1960s London, where everything is changing--just not always quite as expected.

Synopsis:

From the creator of the Emmy Award-winning Downton Abbey...
 
“Damian Baxter was a friend of mine at Cambridge. We met around the time when I was doing the Season at the end of the Sixties. I introduced him to some of the girls. They took him up, and we ran about together in London for a while….”

Nearly forty years later, the narrator hates Damian Baxter and would gladly forget their disastrous last encounter. But if it is pleasant to hear from an old friend, it is more interesting to hear from an old enemy, and so he accepts an invitation from the rich and dying Damian, who begs him to track down the past girlfriend whose anonymous letter claimed he had fathered a child during that ruinous debutante season.

The search takes the narrator back to the extraordinary world of swinging London, where aristocratic parents schemed to find suitable matches for their daughters while someone was putting hash in the brownies at a ball at Madame Tussauds. It was a time when everything seemed to be changing—and it was, but not always quite as expected.

About the Author

JULIAN FELLOWES is the winner of the 2001 Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for Gosford Park. He also wrote the screenplays for Vanity Fair and The Young Victoria. His first novel, Snobs, was a New York Times, LA Times, and BookSense bestseller; his other works include The Curious Adventure of the Abandoned Toys and the book for the Disney stage musical of Mary Poppins. He lives in London and Dorset, England.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312570682
Author:
Fellowes, Julian
Publisher:
St. Martin's Griffin
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
London (England) Social life and customs.
Subject:
Nineteen sixties
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20120508
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Past Imperfect Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.50 In Stock
Product details 416 pages St. Martin's Press - English 9780312570682 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A middle-aged Londoner is forced to revisit his past in Fellowes's slick and dexterous second novel (after the bestselling Snobs). Former friend Damian Baxter, after 40 years of estrangement, convinces the unnamed narrator to locate the woman Damian believes to have borne his child in 1968. As the narrator looks back on the events of that fateful summer, Fellowes exercises his considerable talent for observing the nuances of custom and class distinction. Especially interesting are the frequent digressions to consider the peculiar juncture of their 'safe little, nearly-pre-1939 world' with the Swinging Sixties. In the narrator's circle of friends-who would fit comfortably into a Trollope novel-the ossified conventions of the upper class still hold sway, yet the '60s make an appearance as well, enlivening a debutante party with surprise hash brownies. We quickly discover that middle-class Damian (a 'social mountaineer') managed to insinuate himself into this smart set until a terrible scene tears apart the group of friends. Deservedly compared to Tom Wolfe, Fellowes, with his ability to document the aristocracy with a sociologist's eye, fashions intriguing narratives." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Wishing to track down a past girlfriend who claims he had fathered her child, the rich and dying Damian Baxter contacts an old friend from his days at Cambridge. The search takes the narrator back to 1960s London, where everything is changing--just not always quite as expected.
"Synopsis" by ,
From the creator of the Emmy Award-winning Downton Abbey...
 
“Damian Baxter was a friend of mine at Cambridge. We met around the time when I was doing the Season at the end of the Sixties. I introduced him to some of the girls. They took him up, and we ran about together in London for a while….”

Nearly forty years later, the narrator hates Damian Baxter and would gladly forget their disastrous last encounter. But if it is pleasant to hear from an old friend, it is more interesting to hear from an old enemy, and so he accepts an invitation from the rich and dying Damian, who begs him to track down the past girlfriend whose anonymous letter claimed he had fathered a child during that ruinous debutante season.

The search takes the narrator back to the extraordinary world of swinging London, where aristocratic parents schemed to find suitable matches for their daughters while someone was putting hash in the brownies at a ball at Madame Tussauds. It was a time when everything seemed to be changing—and it was, but not always quite as expected.

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