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Delhi: Adventures in a Megacity

Delhi: Adventures in a Megacity Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A provocative portrait of one of the worlds largest cities, delving behind the tourist facade to illustrate the people and places beyond the realms of the conventional travelogue

Sam Miller set out to discover the real Delhi, a city he describes as “Indias dreamtown—and its purgatory.” He treads the city streets, making his way through the city and its suburbs, visiting its less celebrated destinations—Nehru Place, Rohini, Ghazipur, and Gurgaon—which most writers and travelers ignore. His quest is the here and now, the unexpected, the overlooked, and the eccentric. All the obvious ports of call make appearances: the ancient monuments, the imperial buildings, and the celebrities of modern Delhi. But it is through his encounters with Delhis people—from a professor of astrophysics to a crematorium attendant, from ragpickers to members of a police brass band—that Miller creates this richly entertaining portrait of what Delhi means to its residents, and of what the city is becoming.

Miller, like so many of the people he meets, is a migrant in one of the worlds fastest growing megapolises, and the Delhi he depicts is one whose future concerns us all. He possesses an intense curiosity; he has an infallible eye for lifes diversities, for all the marvelous and sublime moments that illuminate peoples lives. This is a generous, original, humorous portrait of a great city; one that unerringly locates the humanity beneath the mundane, the unsung, and the unfamiliar.

Sam Miller was born in London in 1962. He studied history at Cambridge University and politics at London Universitys School of Oriental and African Studies, before joining the BBC. In the early nineties he was a BBC World Service correspondent in Delhi. He returned to Delhi in 2002, where he now runs media projects for the BBC World Service Trust, and also works as a TV commentator, journalist, and book reviewer. He is married to Shireen and they have two children, Zubin and Roxana.

Sam Miller set out to discover the real Delhi, a city he describes as “Indias dreamtown—and its purgatory.” He treads the city streets, making his way through the city and its suburbs, visiting its less celebrated destinations—Nehru Place, Rohini, Ghazipur, and Gurgaon—which most writers and travelers ignore. His quest is the here and now, the unexpected, the overlooked, and the eccentric. In reading his narratives, we see the ancient monuments and the imperial buildings from the view of those who inhabit the city. For it is through his encounters with Delhis people—from a professor of astrophysics to a crematorium attendant, from ragpickers to members of a police brass band—that Miller creates this richly entertaining portrait of what Delhi means to its residents, and of what the city is becoming.

Miller, like so many of the people he meets, is a migrant in one of the worlds fastest growing megapolises, and the Delhi he depicts is one whose future concerns us all. He possesses an intense curiosity and an eye for lifes diversities. This is a generous, original, humorous portrait of a great city; one that unerringly locates the humanity beneath the mundane, the unsung, and the unfamiliar.

“Sam Miller has created a book that is both a quest and a love letter, and one which is as pleasingly eccentric and anarchic as its subject.”—William Dalrymple, author of City of Djinns, in his “Books of the Year” for the New Statesman (UK)

“[Delhi is] a revelation . . . The liveliest of city travelogues.”—Literary Review (UK)

“Millers talent is dizzying and his narrative a rich accomplishment. I walked miles in Delhi—without moving an inch.”—The Times (UK)

“A thoroughly entertaining book . . . about a fascinating city.”—Financial Times (UK)

“[An] erudite, comical portrait of a city . . . An entertaining and thoughtful book.”—Evening Standard (UK)

“As a modern-day flaneur, Miller makes laser-sharp observations of the citys architecture and inhabitants, talking to everyone from university professors to ragpickers.”—Lonely Planet Magazine

“A walking encyclopedia on contemporary Delhi.”—India Today

"Miller offers a flâneur's account of Delhi-'India's dreamland-and its purgatory' as he strolls through slums and gated communities, humble neighborhood parks and historic tombs. A longtime BBC correspondent based in Delhi, Miller understands and deftly conveys India's contradictions and makes cultural commentary with an insider's confidence. Even if there is a strain of smugness—Miller seems to enjoy feeling slightly superior to more unseasoned foreigners and middle-class Delhites who don't share his interest in walking around the city-it's fleeting; he is so likeable and so willing to confront the city on its own terms. He visits porn theaters, visits cult members, falls into manholes. He shifts easily from the comic to the serious, to the darker details of Delhi life—the water shortages, violence, disease, and staggering income disparity—helped by a picaresque narrative complete with chapter headings ('Chapter One: In which the Author is dazzled by the Metro, finds a cure for hemorrhoids, and turns the tables on a an unscrupulous shoeshine man'). A cityscape suffused with wisdom, chance, and delight."—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Review:

"Miller offers a flâneur's account of Delhi-'India's dreamland-and its purgatory' as he strolls through slums and gated communities, humble neighborhood parks and historic tombs. A longtime BBC correspondent based in Delhi, Miller understands and deftly conveys India's contradictions and makes cultural commentary with an insider's confidence. Even if there is a strain of smugness-Miller seems to enjoy feeling slightly superior to more unseasoned foreigners and middle-class Delhites who don't share his interest in walking around the city-it's fleeting; he is so likeable and so willing to confront the city on its own terms. He visits porn theaters, visits cult members, falls into manholes. He shifts easily from the comic to the serious, to the darker details of Delhi life-the water shortages, violence, disease, and staggering income disparity-helped by a picaresque narrative complete with chapter headings ('Chapter One: In which the Author is dazzled by the Metro, finds a cure for hemorrhoids, and turns the tables on a an unscrupulous shoeshine man'). A cityscape suffused with wisdom, chance, and delight." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

A provocative portrait of one of the world's largest cities, delving behind the tourist facade to illustrate the people and places beyond the realms of the conventional travelogue

Sam Miller set out to discover the real Delhi, a city he describes as India's dreamtown--and its purgatory. He treads the city streets, making his way through the city and its suburbs, visiting its less celebrated destinations--Nehru Place, Rohini, Ghazipur, and Gurgaon--which most writers and travelers ignore. His quest is the here and now, the unexpected, the overlooked, and the eccentric. All the obvious ports of call make appearances: the ancient monuments, the imperial buildings, and the celebrities of modern Delhi. But it is through his encounters with Delhi's people--from a professor of astrophysics to a crematorium attendant, from ragpickers to members of a police brass band--that Miller creates this richly entertaining portrait of what Delhi means to its residents, and of what the city is becoming.

Miller, like so many of the people he meets, is a migrant in one of the world's fastest growing megapolises, and the Delhi he depicts is one whose future concerns us all. He possesses an intense curiosity; he has an infallible eye for life's diversities, for all the marvelous and sublime moments that illuminate people's lives. This is a generous, original, humorous portrait of a great city; one that unerringly locates the humanity beneath the mundane, the unsung, and the unfamiliar.

Synopsis:

A provocative portrait of one of the worlds largest cities, delving behind the tourist facade to illustrate the people and places beyond the realms of the conventional travelogue

Sam Miller set out to discover the real Delhi, a city he describes as “Indias dreamtown—and its purgatory.” He treads the city streets, making his way through the city and its suburbs, visiting its less celebrated destinations—Nehru Place, Rohini, Ghazipur, and Gurgaon—which most writers and travelers ignore. His quest is the here and now, the unexpected, the overlooked, and the eccentric. All the obvious ports of call make appearances: the ancient monuments, the imperial buildings, and the celebrities of modern Delhi. But it is through his encounters with Delhis people—from a professor of astrophysics to a crematorium attendant, from ragpickers to members of a police brass band—that Miller creates this richly entertaining portrait of what Delhi means to its residents, and of what the city is becoming.

Miller, like so many of the people he meets, is a migrant in one of the worlds fastest growing megapolises, and the Delhi he depicts is one whose future concerns us all. He possesses an intense curiosity; he has an infallible eye for lifes diversities, for all the marvelous and sublime moments that illuminate peoples lives. This is a generous, original, humorous portrait of a great city; one that unerringly locates the humanity beneath the mundane, the unsung, and the unfamiliar.

About the Author

Sam Miller was born in London in 1962. He studied history at Cambridge University and politics at London Universitys School of Oriental and African Studies, before joining the BBC. In the early nineties he was a BBC World Service correspondent in Delhi. He returned to Delhi in 2002, where he now runs media projects for the BBC World Service Trust, and also works as a TV commentator, journalist, and book reviewer. He is married to Shireen and they have two children, Zubin and Roxana.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312612375
Subtitle:
Adventures in a Megacity
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Author:
Miller, Sam
Subject:
Essays & Travelogues
Subject:
Asia - India & South Asia
Subject:
Asia - India
Subject:
South asia
Subject:
Travel-India
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20100720
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes 80 black-and-white photographs
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Asia » India » Ancient and General
History and Social Science » Asia » India » Modern
History and Social Science » World History » India
Travel » Asia » India
Travel » Travel Writing » General

Delhi: Adventures in a Megacity
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 304 pages St. Martin's Press - English 9780312612375 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Miller offers a flâneur's account of Delhi-'India's dreamland-and its purgatory' as he strolls through slums and gated communities, humble neighborhood parks and historic tombs. A longtime BBC correspondent based in Delhi, Miller understands and deftly conveys India's contradictions and makes cultural commentary with an insider's confidence. Even if there is a strain of smugness-Miller seems to enjoy feeling slightly superior to more unseasoned foreigners and middle-class Delhites who don't share his interest in walking around the city-it's fleeting; he is so likeable and so willing to confront the city on its own terms. He visits porn theaters, visits cult members, falls into manholes. He shifts easily from the comic to the serious, to the darker details of Delhi life-the water shortages, violence, disease, and staggering income disparity-helped by a picaresque narrative complete with chapter headings ('Chapter One: In which the Author is dazzled by the Metro, finds a cure for hemorrhoids, and turns the tables on a an unscrupulous shoeshine man'). A cityscape suffused with wisdom, chance, and delight." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , A provocative portrait of one of the world's largest cities, delving behind the tourist facade to illustrate the people and places beyond the realms of the conventional travelogue

Sam Miller set out to discover the real Delhi, a city he describes as India's dreamtown--and its purgatory. He treads the city streets, making his way through the city and its suburbs, visiting its less celebrated destinations--Nehru Place, Rohini, Ghazipur, and Gurgaon--which most writers and travelers ignore. His quest is the here and now, the unexpected, the overlooked, and the eccentric. All the obvious ports of call make appearances: the ancient monuments, the imperial buildings, and the celebrities of modern Delhi. But it is through his encounters with Delhi's people--from a professor of astrophysics to a crematorium attendant, from ragpickers to members of a police brass band--that Miller creates this richly entertaining portrait of what Delhi means to its residents, and of what the city is becoming.

Miller, like so many of the people he meets, is a migrant in one of the world's fastest growing megapolises, and the Delhi he depicts is one whose future concerns us all. He possesses an intense curiosity; he has an infallible eye for life's diversities, for all the marvelous and sublime moments that illuminate people's lives. This is a generous, original, humorous portrait of a great city; one that unerringly locates the humanity beneath the mundane, the unsung, and the unfamiliar.

"Synopsis" by ,

A provocative portrait of one of the worlds largest cities, delving behind the tourist facade to illustrate the people and places beyond the realms of the conventional travelogue

Sam Miller set out to discover the real Delhi, a city he describes as “Indias dreamtown—and its purgatory.” He treads the city streets, making his way through the city and its suburbs, visiting its less celebrated destinations—Nehru Place, Rohini, Ghazipur, and Gurgaon—which most writers and travelers ignore. His quest is the here and now, the unexpected, the overlooked, and the eccentric. All the obvious ports of call make appearances: the ancient monuments, the imperial buildings, and the celebrities of modern Delhi. But it is through his encounters with Delhis people—from a professor of astrophysics to a crematorium attendant, from ragpickers to members of a police brass band—that Miller creates this richly entertaining portrait of what Delhi means to its residents, and of what the city is becoming.

Miller, like so many of the people he meets, is a migrant in one of the worlds fastest growing megapolises, and the Delhi he depicts is one whose future concerns us all. He possesses an intense curiosity; he has an infallible eye for lifes diversities, for all the marvelous and sublime moments that illuminate peoples lives. This is a generous, original, humorous portrait of a great city; one that unerringly locates the humanity beneath the mundane, the unsung, and the unfamiliar.

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