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1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half

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1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"This is a starry love story, a tale of seething jealousies and subterfuge, a political imbroglio, and religious cruelties. It sounds like Shakespeare and it could have very well been the plot of one of his plays."

--Toronto Star

In 1494, award-winning author Stephen R. Bown tells the untold story of the explosive feud between monarchs, clergy, and explorers that split the globe between Spain and Portugal and made the worlds oceans a battleground.

When Columbus triumphantly returned from America to Spain in 1493, his discoveries inflamed an already-smouldering conflict between Spains renowned monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, and Portugals João II. Which nation was to control the worlds oceans? To quell the argument, Pope Alexander VI—the notorious Rodrigo Borgia—issued a proclamation laying the foundation for the Treaty of Tordesillas of 1494, an edict that created an imaginary line in the Atlantic Ocean dividing the entire known (and unknown) world between Spain and Portugal.

Just as the worlds oceans were about to be opened by Columbuss epochal voyage, the treaty sought to limit the seas to these two favored Catholic nations. The edict was to have a profound influence on world history: it propelled Spain and Portugal to superpower status, steered many other European nations on a collision course, and became the central grievance in two centuries of international espionage, piracy, and warfare.

The treaty also began the fight for “the freedom of the seas”—the epic struggle to determine whether the worlds oceans, and thus global commerce, would be controlled by the decree of an autocrat or be open to the ships of any nation—a distinctly modern notion, championed in the early seventeenth century by the Dutch legal theorist Hugo Grotius, whose arguments became the foundation of international law.

At the heart of one of the greatest international diplomatic and political agreements of the last five centuries were the strained relationships and passions of a handful of powerful individuals. They were linked by a shared history, mutual animosity, and personal obligations—quarrels, rivalries, and hatreds that dated back decades. Yet the struggle ultimately stemmed from a young womans determination to defy tradition and the king, and to choose her own husband.

Review:

"Historian Bown (Scurvy) offers an entertaining, though often repetitive, chronicle of intrigue, deception, and power struggles in the early modern world. When Columbus returned from the New World to Spain in 1493, Portugal's King João II claimed that a series of papal decrees clearly guaranteed that these rich lands belonged to him. The Spanish monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella sent an envoy to Pope Alexander VI, and following the pope's decree that Ferdinand, Isabella, and their heirs had exclusive rights to travel in and trade with Columbus's newfound lands, Spain and Portugal signed the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494. It extended an imaginary line on a north-south axis in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean; Portugal retained all lands east of the line, and all lands to the west of the line were the Spain's sole domain. As Bown points out, both nations benefited from this treaty; Portugal quickly grew rich from its monopoly on the trade routes to India and the Spice Islands, while Spain overtook the Aztec, Mayan, and Inca empires, shipping home vast quantities of gold. Bown's captivating study presents a fresh glimpse into the origins of the age of exploration and conquest as other nations challenged the primacy of Spain and Portugal. 24 illus.; maps." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

The untold story of how a personal struggle between queens and kings, churchmen and explorers split the globe between Spain and Portugal and made the world's oceans a battleground.
 
When Columbus first returned from America to Spain, his discoveries inflamed a smouldering conflict between Portugal's King João II and Spain's monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella. Acting hastily, Pope Alexander VI issued a proclamation providing the foundation for the Treaty of Tordesillas, which created an imaginary line in the Atlantic Ocean dividing the world between Spain and Portugal. 
 
Award-winning popular historian Stephen Bown shows how this treaty has had a profound influence on centuries of world history, propelling both countries to superpower status, steering many European nations on a collision course and emerging as the central grievance that stimulated two centuries of international espionage, piracy and warfare.

About the Author

STEPHEN R. BOWN is the author of Scurvy, A Most Damnable Invention, and Merchant Kings. He lives in the Canadian Rockies.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312616120
Author:
Bown, Stephen R.
Publisher:
Thomas Dunne Books
Subject:
Americas (North Central South West Indies)
Subject:
Europe - General
Subject:
World
Subject:
General
Subject:
World History-European History General
Subject:
Spain & Portugal
Subject:
Medieval
Subject:
International
Subject:
World History-Spain
Publication Date:
20120231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes 24 bandw maps and illustrations
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Western Civilization » Medieval
History and Social Science » Western Civilization » Renaissance
History and Social Science » World History » European History General
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » Medieval and Renaissance
History and Social Science » World History » Spain

1494: How a Family Feud in Medieval Spain Divided the World in Half New Hardcover
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Product details 304 pages Thomas Dunne Books - English 9780312616120 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Historian Bown (Scurvy) offers an entertaining, though often repetitive, chronicle of intrigue, deception, and power struggles in the early modern world. When Columbus returned from the New World to Spain in 1493, Portugal's King João II claimed that a series of papal decrees clearly guaranteed that these rich lands belonged to him. The Spanish monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella sent an envoy to Pope Alexander VI, and following the pope's decree that Ferdinand, Isabella, and their heirs had exclusive rights to travel in and trade with Columbus's newfound lands, Spain and Portugal signed the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494. It extended an imaginary line on a north-south axis in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean; Portugal retained all lands east of the line, and all lands to the west of the line were the Spain's sole domain. As Bown points out, both nations benefited from this treaty; Portugal quickly grew rich from its monopoly on the trade routes to India and the Spice Islands, while Spain overtook the Aztec, Mayan, and Inca empires, shipping home vast quantities of gold. Bown's captivating study presents a fresh glimpse into the origins of the age of exploration and conquest as other nations challenged the primacy of Spain and Portugal. 24 illus.; maps." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
The untold story of how a personal struggle between queens and kings, churchmen and explorers split the globe between Spain and Portugal and made the world's oceans a battleground.
 
When Columbus first returned from America to Spain, his discoveries inflamed a smouldering conflict between Portugal's King João II and Spain's monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella. Acting hastily, Pope Alexander VI issued a proclamation providing the foundation for the Treaty of Tordesillas, which created an imaginary line in the Atlantic Ocean dividing the world between Spain and Portugal. 
 
Award-winning popular historian Stephen Bown shows how this treaty has had a profound influence on centuries of world history, propelling both countries to superpower status, steering many European nations on a collision course and emerging as the central grievance that stimulated two centuries of international espionage, piracy and warfare.
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