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The Real Animal House: The Awesomely Depraved Saga of the Fraternity That Inspired the Movie

by

The Real Animal House: The Awesomely Depraved Saga of the Fraternity That Inspired the Movie Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Thirty years after Animal House showed the world the meaning of toga, Chris Miller — the writer whose National Lampoon stories inspired the movie — finally answers the question, Was it really that wild?

The movie didn't tell the half of it.

Chris Miller, aka Pinto, takes us back to a different world. A world where a legendary frat brother really might go to a sorority house for a sympathy date after reading an obituary. Or slather himself with mustard and crawl around the dance floor looking for women to bite. Or practice for the distance-booting event. Or find unheard-of ways for improving the party punch recipe. All while working toward the ultimate college goal: losing your virginity at last.

Writing with a freshness and joy that makes Dartmouth 1960 feel like rock-and-roll heaven on earth, Chris Miller tells the story of the Alpha Delta house as no one else could. Seal, Doberman, Otter, the legendary Moses (he of the burning bush...) — these titans and dozens of others come alive again, taunting cops, surviving their own lunacy, and challenging the squareness of a stifling time. The Real Animal House is the perfect antidote for a conventional age much like today.

Review:

"The screenplay for National Lampoon's Animal House was the brainchild of National Lampoon editor Harold Ramis, Doug Kenny and Miller, who turned Dartmouth frat life into the 1978 hit movie. Often, their stories were considered too sordid for Universal's producers to air. Ironically, what seemed too gross to put on screen in the '70s is now too boring to put in print. Yet without actors to give dimension to the zany characters, the tall tales feel like an awkward, horny sophomore faking bravado. What readers learn is Miller's obsession with puerile details and his insane desire to degrade himself. Pinto, the name he gave himself at Dartmouth, finds acceptance at a fraternity because of his 'booting prowess' (vomiting skills); he witnesses the sexual victories of his pals, drinks himself sick and survives car accidents. Like the outtakes in DVDs, this book proves that Miller's frat-boy shenanigans deserved to stay on the cutting-room floor, not because of any sense of prudery, but to save the reader from testosterone-fueled overkill. Die-hard fans may be amused by the tales of 'Bags' and 'Seal,' the two real-life inspirations for Animal House's Bluto, the role John Belushi nailed. But none of the recorded pranks have the life-spirit contained in Belushi's clarion call: 'Toga!'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The screenplay for National Lampoon's Animal House was the brainchild of National Lampoon editor Harold Ramis, Doug Kenny and Miller, who turned Dartmouth frat life into the 1978 hit movie. Often, their stories were considered too sordid for Universal's producers to air. Ironically, what seemed too gross to put on screen in the '70s is now too boring to put in print. Yet without actors to give dimension to the zany characters, the tall tales feel like an awkward, horny sophomore faking bravado. What readers learn is Miller's obsession with puerile details and his insane desire to degrade himself. Pinto, the name he gave himself at Dartmouth, finds acceptance at a fraternity because of his 'booting prowess' (vomiting skills); he witnesses the sexual victories of his pals, drinks himself sick and survives car accidents. Like the outtakes in DVDs, this book proves that Miller's frat-boy shenanigans deserved to stay on the cutting-room floor, not because of any sense of prudery, but to save the reader from testosterone-fueled overkill. Die-hard fans may be amused by the tales of 'Bags' and 'Seal,' the two real-life inspirations for Animal House's Bluto, the role John Belushi nailed. But none of the recorded pranks have the life-spirit contained in Belushi's clarion call: 'Toga!'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A boozy holler of a book, with a great soundtrack." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

The creator of Animal House at last tells the real story of the fraternity that inspired the iconic film — a story far more outrageous and funny than any movie could ever capture.

Synopsis:

"Loud, raucous, infantile, racy, and very funny...The book is full of likable eccentrics, sexual shenanigans, and--if you know where to look for them--valuable life lessons."--Booklist

Animal House, the movie, didn't tell the half of it.

Writing with a freshness and joy that make Dartmouth 1960 feel like a beer-soaked rock-and-roll heaven on earth, Chris Miller tells the real story of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity as no one else could. Seal, Doberman, Otter, the legendary Moses (he of the burning bush) - these titans and dozens of others come alive again, terrorizing the administration, taunting cops, surviving their own lunacy, and challenging the squareness of a stifling time. The Real Animal House is the perfect antidote for a conventional age much like today.

"A breezy, chuckle-worthy read, and a must for the Animal House fan." -Courier-Post

"Action-packed. . . . A boozy holler of a book, with a great soundtrack." -Kirkus Reviews

"A seriously funny read. . . . The joy and exuberance that Pinto and his pals demonstrate holds a lesson for every generation that needs to learn not to blindly follow the expectations of parents and guidance counselors, but to seek out those blissful bands of merry misfits that appear from time to time." -Review

About the Author

Chris Miller is a screenwriter who was the story-writer in residence at National Lampoon for 25 years. A former ad man responsible for coining such phrases as "I'm cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs!," he now lives in Venice, California.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780316057011
Subtitle:
The Awesomely Depraved Saga of the Fraternity That Inspired the Movie
Author:
Miller, Chris
Foreword:
Ramis, Harold
Publisher:
Back Bay Books
Subject:
Students & Student Life
Subject:
Entertainment & Performing Arts - General
Subject:
Alpha Delta Phi
Subject:
Dartmouth Chapter
Subject:
Entertainment & Performing Arts
Copyright:
Publication Date:
November 1, 2006
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 x 1 in 0.77 lb

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Specific Film
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Biography » Entertainment and Performing Arts

The Real Animal House: The Awesomely Depraved Saga of the Fraternity That Inspired the Movie Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 384 pages Little Brown and Company - English 9780316057011 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The screenplay for National Lampoon's Animal House was the brainchild of National Lampoon editor Harold Ramis, Doug Kenny and Miller, who turned Dartmouth frat life into the 1978 hit movie. Often, their stories were considered too sordid for Universal's producers to air. Ironically, what seemed too gross to put on screen in the '70s is now too boring to put in print. Yet without actors to give dimension to the zany characters, the tall tales feel like an awkward, horny sophomore faking bravado. What readers learn is Miller's obsession with puerile details and his insane desire to degrade himself. Pinto, the name he gave himself at Dartmouth, finds acceptance at a fraternity because of his 'booting prowess' (vomiting skills); he witnesses the sexual victories of his pals, drinks himself sick and survives car accidents. Like the outtakes in DVDs, this book proves that Miller's frat-boy shenanigans deserved to stay on the cutting-room floor, not because of any sense of prudery, but to save the reader from testosterone-fueled overkill. Die-hard fans may be amused by the tales of 'Bags' and 'Seal,' the two real-life inspirations for Animal House's Bluto, the role John Belushi nailed. But none of the recorded pranks have the life-spirit contained in Belushi's clarion call: 'Toga!'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The screenplay for National Lampoon's Animal House was the brainchild of National Lampoon editor Harold Ramis, Doug Kenny and Miller, who turned Dartmouth frat life into the 1978 hit movie. Often, their stories were considered too sordid for Universal's producers to air. Ironically, what seemed too gross to put on screen in the '70s is now too boring to put in print. Yet without actors to give dimension to the zany characters, the tall tales feel like an awkward, horny sophomore faking bravado. What readers learn is Miller's obsession with puerile details and his insane desire to degrade himself. Pinto, the name he gave himself at Dartmouth, finds acceptance at a fraternity because of his 'booting prowess' (vomiting skills); he witnesses the sexual victories of his pals, drinks himself sick and survives car accidents. Like the outtakes in DVDs, this book proves that Miller's frat-boy shenanigans deserved to stay on the cutting-room floor, not because of any sense of prudery, but to save the reader from testosterone-fueled overkill. Die-hard fans may be amused by the tales of 'Bags' and 'Seal,' the two real-life inspirations for Animal House's Bluto, the role John Belushi nailed. But none of the recorded pranks have the life-spirit contained in Belushi's clarion call: 'Toga!'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "A boozy holler of a book, with a great soundtrack."
"Synopsis" by , The creator of Animal House at last tells the real story of the fraternity that inspired the iconic film — a story far more outrageous and funny than any movie could ever capture.
"Synopsis" by , "Loud, raucous, infantile, racy, and very funny...The book is full of likable eccentrics, sexual shenanigans, and--if you know where to look for them--valuable life lessons."--Booklist

Animal House, the movie, didn't tell the half of it.

Writing with a freshness and joy that make Dartmouth 1960 feel like a beer-soaked rock-and-roll heaven on earth, Chris Miller tells the real story of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity as no one else could. Seal, Doberman, Otter, the legendary Moses (he of the burning bush) - these titans and dozens of others come alive again, terrorizing the administration, taunting cops, surviving their own lunacy, and challenging the squareness of a stifling time. The Real Animal House is the perfect antidote for a conventional age much like today.

"A breezy, chuckle-worthy read, and a must for the Animal House fan." -Courier-Post

"Action-packed. . . . A boozy holler of a book, with a great soundtrack." -Kirkus Reviews

"A seriously funny read. . . . The joy and exuberance that Pinto and his pals demonstrate holds a lesson for every generation that needs to learn not to blindly follow the expectations of parents and guidance counselors, but to seek out those blissful bands of merry misfits that appear from time to time." -Review

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