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Eating Animals

by

Eating Animals Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Insects. Theyand#8217;re whatand#8217;s for dinner. Can you imagine a world in which that simple statement is not only true but in fact an unremarkable part of daily life? Daniella Martin, entomophagist and blogger, can.

In this rollicking excursion into the world of edible insects, Martin takes us to the front lines of the next big trend in the global food movement and shows us how insects just might be the key to solving world hunger. Along the way, we sample moth larvae tacos at the Don Bugito food cart in San Francisco, travel to Copenhagen to meet the experimental tasters at Nomaand#8217;s Nordic Food Lab, gawk at the insects stocked in the frozen food aisle at Thailandand#8217;s Costco, and even crash an underground bug-eating club in Tokyo.

Martin argues that bugs have long been an important part of indigenous diets and cuisines around the world, and investigates our own cultureand#8217;s bias against their use as a food source. She shines a light on the cutting-edge research of Marcel Dicke and other scientists who are only now beginning to determine the nutritional makeup of insects and champion them as an efficient and sustainable food source.

Whether you love or hate bugs, Edible will radically change the way you think about the global food crisis and perhaps persuade you that insects are much more than a common pest. For the adventurous, the book includes an illustrated list of edible insects, recipes, and instructions on how to raise bugs at home.

Synopsis:

Faced with the prospect of being unable to explain to his children why people eat some animals and not others, Foer set out to explore the origins of many eating traditions and the fictions involved with creating them.

Synopsis:

In the tradition of Michael Pollan and Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer, an anthropologist makes the case for why insects are the key to solving the worldand#8217;s food problems.

Synopsis:

On a quest to protect the next generation from mounting climate change, renowned journalist Mark Hertsgaard offers a deeply reported blueprint on how to navigate this unavoidable new era.

Synopsis:

"Hot bravely takes aim at perhaps the greatest climate threat of all: apathy." — Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation

"Hertsgaards answers . . . are lucid, realistic, and offer reason for hope." — Christian Science Monitor

For twenty years, Mark Hertsgaard has investigated global warming as a journalist, but the full truth did not hit home until he became a father and, soon thereafter, learned that climate change was bound to worsen for decades to come. Hertsgaard's daughter is part of what he has dubbed "Generation Hot" — the two billion young people worldwide who will spend the rest of their lives coping with climate disruption. Drawing on reporting from around the world, Hot is a call to action that injects hope and solutions into a debate characterized by doom and gloom and offers a blueprint for how all of us ? parents, communities, countries ? can navigate an unavoidable new era.

"[Hots] urgent message is one that citizens and governments cannot afford to ignore." — Boston Globe

Synopsis:

Like many young Americans, Jonathan Safran Foer spent much of his teenage and college years oscillating between enthusiastic carnivore and occasional vegetarian. As he became a husband, and then a father, the moral dimensions of eating became increasingly important to him. Faced with the prospect of being unable to explain why we eat some animals and not others, Foer set out to explore the origins of many eating traditions and the fictions involved with creating them.

Traveling to the darkest corners of our dining habits, Foer raises the unspoken question behind every fish we eat, every chicken we fry, and every burger we grill. Part memoir and part investigative report, Eating Animals is a book that, in the words of the Los Angeles Times, places Jonathan Safran Foer "at the table with our greatest philosophers."

About the Author

Jonathan Safran Foer is the author of Everything Is Illuminated and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. His books have been translated into thirty-six languages. Everything Is Illuminated received a National Jewish Book Award and a Guardian First Book Award, and was made into a film by Liev Schreiber. Foer lives in Brooklyn.

Table of Contents

Introductionand#8195;1

1.and#160;The Problemand#8195;15

2.and#160;The Real Paleo Dietand#8195;31

3.and#160;Why Eat Bugs?and#8195;51

4.and#160;In the Mouth of the Beholderand#8195;73

5.and#160;The Breakupand#8195;87

6.and#160;Learning How to Tasteand#8195;113

7.and#160;In the Mouth of the Beholderand#8195;127

8.and#160;When in Thailandand#8195;139

9.and#160;The Final Frontierand#8195;157

Epilogueand#8195;167

Acknowledgmentsand#8195;177

How to Raise Bugs at Homeand#8195;179

The Essential List of Edible Insectsand#8195;187

Delectable Edible Insect Recipesand#8195;225

Bibliographyand#8195;241

About the Authorand#8195;243

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 8 comments:

LTHMPLS, September 5, 2011 (view all comments by LTHMPLS)
I typically rate books and do not write reviews. Why should I throw my two cents in about a topic when everyone else has probably said the same thing--and more eloquently? Do I need to repeat what has already been written just so I can see my name somewhere? It feels narcissistic. Or perhaps that is just a good excuse for not being able to add anything new?

This one is hard to leave without a review or reflection though. I am not even sure what a rating matters in this instance. I could give it a 3 or a 4 because I thought it was powerful, but felt too emotionally wrenched by it or manipulated by the rhetoric. I could give it a one for forcing me to reconsider my purchasing and eating habits and for making me feel like I have a horrible conscience. A five would signal the transformative power contained herein. Any of these feels arbitrary, so I give it a four based on all of these reasons.

I did not enjoy this book. I found it funny in a few places. I was perplexed by some of his comments (his belittling dismissal of normal consumers who would take the slaughter of an animal's life into their own hands in order to know from where their food came). He is clever and he pushes cultural norms and logical buttons (dogs as a source of food). And yes, he is absolutely rhetorically dastardly.

Why shouldn't he be? The industry of factory farming does not play fair and acts with such stomach-churning cruelty that his rhetorical deviousness is the best approach. Going about our normal lives and presuming that we live in a harmless society or pretending that our consumption is not harmful to the animals, our environment, and ultimately to us (see his connection to pandemics) is as unsustainable as these "farms."

Foer himself is a vegetarian and his ultimate goal is vague. He says that the book is not simply a case for vegetarianism--though this seems ideal because it reduces animal suffering the most. He presents some of the family farmers and ranchers who truly care about animals, try to give them happy lives, and the least-cruel death possible. These real farmers do exist and can thrive (and multiply) if our consumption changes. In some ways, this approach--fully funded and supported through our ethical choices--is more of a blow to the factory farm behemoth (and more realistic) than assuming there will be a mass conversion to vegetarianism. It is also supported by vegetarian ranchers and vegan slaughterhouse builders.

I have known many of these facts and yet have turned away and gone back to my old ways of thoughtless consumption in the past. This feels different. I do not see how my desire for animal flesh can justify the cruelty and suffering that Foer presents in these pages (and is available through many other sources). Rate it whatever you want, but read it and wrestle with it.


Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(4 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
Martin Hallanzzini, September 1, 2011 (view all comments by Martin Hallanzzini)
Inspired me to join my souse in vegetarianism and saying no to the factory farm. Safron has such an accessible way of writing that allows the reader to fully engage with the topic of EATING ANIMALS.
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(0 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
selena hoy, January 26, 2011 (view all comments by selena hoy)
Great book, makes thoughtful and compelling arguments about considering the implications of our diets. At least one friend felt compelled to make a change after reading this book.
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 8 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780316069885
Author:
Foer, Jonathan Safran
Publisher:
Back Bay Books
Author:
Hertsgaard, Mark
Author:
Martin, Daniella
Subject:
Animal Rights
Subject:
General
Subject:
Agriculture & Food
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Vegetarianism
Subject:
Vegetarianism - Philosophy
Subject:
Outdoors-Conservation and Animal Rights
Subject:
General Social Science
Subject:
Environmental Science
Subject:
climate change;global warming;"generation hot";earth;journalist;father;nonfictio
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20100931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
24 b/w line drawings
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 x 1 in 0.75 lb

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Eating Animals New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.00 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Back Bay Books - English 9780316069885 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Faced with the prospect of being unable to explain to his children why people eat some animals and not others, Foer set out to explore the origins of many eating traditions and the fictions involved with creating them.
"Synopsis" by ,
In the tradition of Michael Pollan and Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer, an anthropologist makes the case for why insects are the key to solving the worldand#8217;s food problems.
"Synopsis" by ,
On a quest to protect the next generation from mounting climate change, renowned journalist Mark Hertsgaard offers a deeply reported blueprint on how to navigate this unavoidable new era.
"Synopsis" by , "Hot bravely takes aim at perhaps the greatest climate threat of all: apathy." — Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation

"Hertsgaards answers . . . are lucid, realistic, and offer reason for hope." — Christian Science Monitor

For twenty years, Mark Hertsgaard has investigated global warming as a journalist, but the full truth did not hit home until he became a father and, soon thereafter, learned that climate change was bound to worsen for decades to come. Hertsgaard's daughter is part of what he has dubbed "Generation Hot" — the two billion young people worldwide who will spend the rest of their lives coping with climate disruption. Drawing on reporting from around the world, Hot is a call to action that injects hope and solutions into a debate characterized by doom and gloom and offers a blueprint for how all of us ? parents, communities, countries ? can navigate an unavoidable new era.

"[Hots] urgent message is one that citizens and governments cannot afford to ignore." — Boston Globe

"Synopsis" by , Like many young Americans, Jonathan Safran Foer spent much of his teenage and college years oscillating between enthusiastic carnivore and occasional vegetarian. As he became a husband, and then a father, the moral dimensions of eating became increasingly important to him. Faced with the prospect of being unable to explain why we eat some animals and not others, Foer set out to explore the origins of many eating traditions and the fictions involved with creating them.

Traveling to the darkest corners of our dining habits, Foer raises the unspoken question behind every fish we eat, every chicken we fry, and every burger we grill. Part memoir and part investigative report, Eating Animals is a book that, in the words of the Los Angeles Times, places Jonathan Safran Foer "at the table with our greatest philosophers."

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