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1 Hawthorne Archaeology- North America

House of Rain: Tracking a Vanished Civilization Across the American Southwest

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House of Rain: Tracking a Vanished Civilization Across the American Southwest Cover

ISBN13: 9780316608176
ISBN10: 0316608173
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A feat of historical detection — the most significant, and certainly the most enthralling, book on American prehistory to appear in decades.

The greatest "unsolved mystery" of the American Southwest relates to the Anasazi, the native peoples who by the 11th century converged on Chaco Canyon (now New Mexico) and built a flourishing cultural center that attracted pilgrims from far and wide, a vital crossroads of the prehistoric world. The Anasazis' accomplishments — in agriculture, in art, in commerce, in architecture and engineering — were astounding, rivaling those of the Mayans in distant Central America.

By the 13th century, however, the Anasazi were gone from Chaco. Vanished. What was it — drought? pestilence? war? forced migration? mass murder or suicide? Craig Childs draws on scholarly research and a lifetime of adventure and exploration in the American Southwest to pursue the mystery of their disappearance. Considering many possibilities, he points the way to a new understanding of how a vibrant civilization collapsed.

Review:

"An original, eloquent account of an intellectual and archaeological odyssey." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"The book is finally not so much about what happened to the Anasazi as it is about our own fascination with lost civilizations." Booklist

Review:

"Childs vividly weaves his personal narrative, imbued with a deep respect for the geography and cultural landscape, with scientific research and numerous interactions with foremost scholars." Library Journal

Review:

"Childs has done casual scholars of the prehistoric Southwest a great favor by compiling so much information so fluidly in a single volume." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Childs does a phenomenal job of portraying both the theories and their inventors in favorable lights, and the reader catches a glimpse of a hearty outdoor world filled with people obsessed with the puzzle of the past." Denver Post

Synopsis:

In this landmark work on the Anasazi tribes of the Southwest, naturalist Craig Childs dives head on into the mysteries of this vanished people.


The various tribes that made up the Anasazi people converged on Chaco Canyon (New Mexico) during the 11th century to create a civilization hailed as "the Las Vegas of its day," a flourishing cultural center that attracted pilgrims from far and wide, and a vital crossroads of the prehistoric world. By the 13th century, however, Chaco's vibrant community had disappeared without a trace.


Was it drought? Pestilence? War? Forced migration, mass murder or suicide? Conflicting theories have abounded for years, capturing the North American imagination for eons.

Join Craig Childs as he draws on the latest scholarly research, as well as a lifetime of exploration in the forbidden landscapes of the American Southwest, to shed new light on this compelling mystery. He takes us from Chaco Canyon to the highlands of Mesa Verde, to the Mongollon Rim; to a contemporary Zuni community where tribal elders maintain silence about the fate of their Lost Others; and to the largely unexplored foothills of the Sierra Madre in Mexico, where abundant remnants of Anasazi culture lie yet to be uncovered.

Synopsis:

Childs investigates the greatest "unsolved mystery" of the American Southwest. The Anasazi, the native peoples who by the 11th century converged on Chaco Canyon (now New Mexico), built a flourishing cultural center. By the 13th century, the Anasazi were gone from Chaco. What happened?

About the Author

Craig Child's a naturalist, adventurer, desert ecologist, and frequent contributor to National Public Radio's Morning Edition lives in Crawford, Colorado. His previous books include The Secret Knowledge of Water, Soul of Nowhere, and The Way Out.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Mentalfloss1, November 27, 2007 (view all comments by Mentalfloss1)
What happened to the Anasazi? The response I've almost always heard to that question is, "nobody knows". That remains true, but Craig Childs explores the possibilities, makes some links across space and time, and paints an attractive theory of what it meant to be Anasazi and where this may have led the Anasazi by the time the Conquistadors landed in North America.

I'm a fan of true adventure books, be they about mountain climbing, explorations or just a person pushing themselves hard in the outdoors. In this book Childs describes some amazing and dangerous challenges that he presented to himself. Such as, crossing untracked SW deserts in August, alone. Exploring high desert canyons in the dead of winter. Discovering a missing step while descending a sandstone cliff in Utah but having little choice but to take the risk. He tells his story through the eyes of an anthropoligist, a dreamer, an adventurer, and through the views of others he meets along the way.

If you love the red rock country, the Anasazi, and want some new perspectives this book is highly recommended.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780316608176
Subtitle:
Tracking a Vanished Civilization Across the American Southwest
Author:
Childs, Craig
Publisher:
Back Bay Books
Subject:
General
Subject:
Description and travel
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Essays & Travelogues
Subject:
Native American
Subject:
Antiquities
Subject:
United States - State & Local - General
Subject:
Chaco Culture National Historical Park (N.M.)
Subject:
Four Corners Region Description and travel.
Subject:
Archaeology
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20080703
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
512
Dimensions:
9.60x6.11x1.72 in. 1.67 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Anthropology » North America
History and Social Science » Archaeology » North America
History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
Pets » General

House of Rain: Tracking a Vanished Civilization Across the American Southwest Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$13.95 In Stock
Product details 512 pages Little Brown and Company - English 9780316608176 Reviews:
"Review" by , "An original, eloquent account of an intellectual and archaeological odyssey."
"Review" by , "The book is finally not so much about what happened to the Anasazi as it is about our own fascination with lost civilizations."
"Review" by , "Childs vividly weaves his personal narrative, imbued with a deep respect for the geography and cultural landscape, with scientific research and numerous interactions with foremost scholars."
"Review" by , "Childs has done casual scholars of the prehistoric Southwest a great favor by compiling so much information so fluidly in a single volume."
"Review" by , "Childs does a phenomenal job of portraying both the theories and their inventors in favorable lights, and the reader catches a glimpse of a hearty outdoor world filled with people obsessed with the puzzle of the past."
"Synopsis" by , In this landmark work on the Anasazi tribes of the Southwest, naturalist Craig Childs dives head on into the mysteries of this vanished people.


The various tribes that made up the Anasazi people converged on Chaco Canyon (New Mexico) during the 11th century to create a civilization hailed as "the Las Vegas of its day," a flourishing cultural center that attracted pilgrims from far and wide, and a vital crossroads of the prehistoric world. By the 13th century, however, Chaco's vibrant community had disappeared without a trace.


Was it drought? Pestilence? War? Forced migration, mass murder or suicide? Conflicting theories have abounded for years, capturing the North American imagination for eons.

Join Craig Childs as he draws on the latest scholarly research, as well as a lifetime of exploration in the forbidden landscapes of the American Southwest, to shed new light on this compelling mystery. He takes us from Chaco Canyon to the highlands of Mesa Verde, to the Mongollon Rim; to a contemporary Zuni community where tribal elders maintain silence about the fate of their Lost Others; and to the largely unexplored foothills of the Sierra Madre in Mexico, where abundant remnants of Anasazi culture lie yet to be uncovered.

"Synopsis" by , Childs investigates the greatest "unsolved mystery" of the American Southwest. The Anasazi, the native peoples who by the 11th century converged on Chaco Canyon (now New Mexico), built a flourishing cultural center. By the 13th century, the Anasazi were gone from Chaco. What happened?

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