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1824: The Arkansas War

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1824: The Arkansas War Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the newest volume of this exhilarating series, Eric Flint continues to reshape American history, imagining how a continent and its people might have taken a different path to its future. With 1824: The Arkansas War, he spins an astounding and provocative saga of heroism, battlefield action, racial conflict, and rebellion as a nation recovering from war is plunged into a dangerous era of secession.

Buffered by Spanish possessions to the south and by free states and two rivers to the north, Arkansas has become a country of its own: a hybrid confederation of former slaves, Native American Cherokee and Creek clans, and white abolitionists — including one charismatic warrior who has gone from American hero to bête noire. Irish-born Patrick Driscol is building a fortune and a powerful army in the Arkansas Confederacy, inflaming pro-slavers in Washington and terrifying moderates as well. Caught in the middle is President James Monroe, the gentlemanly Virginian entering his final year in office with a demagogic House Speaker, Henry Clay, nipping at his heels and fanning the fires of war. But Driscol, whose black artillerymen smashed both the Louisiana militia in 1820 and the British in New Orleans, remains a magnet for revolution. And fault lines are erupting throughout the young republic — so that every state, every elected official, and every citizen will soon be forced to choose a side.

For a country whose lifeblood is infected with the slave trade, the war of 1824 will be a bloody crisis of conscience, politics, economics, and military maneuvering that will draw in players from as far away as England. For such men as Secretary of State John Quincy Adams, Commissioner of Indian Affairs Sam Houston, charismatic war hero Andrew Jackson, and the violent abolitionist John Brown, it is a time to change history itself.

Filled with fascinating insights into some of America's most intriguing historical figures, 1824: The Arkansas War confirms Eric Flint as a true master of alternate history, a novelist who brings to bear exhaustive research, remarkable intuition, and a great storyteller's natural gifts to chronicle the making of our nation as it might have been.

Review:

"In Flint's skillful, provocative sequel to his alternative history, 1812: The Rivers of War (2005), the 'Confederacy of the Arkansas' is thriving on the alliance of its Native American and African-American citizens. The independent nation puzzles Northerners but affronts slavery-bound Southerners, who are determined to put these inferior races in their place. Having finagled his way into the White House, a cynical, self-assured Henry Clay launches an invasion of the upstart country, while brawling frontiersman Andrew Jackson and New England intellectual John Quincy Adams become unlikely allies in a new political party based on individual rights. Flint deftly juggles historical details and asks important questions: if America had confronted its institutionalized racism earlier, could our Civil War have been prevented? And can enlightening firsthand experience overcome prejudice? (Nov. 28)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright © Reed Business Information)

Review:

"In Flint's skillful, provocative sequel to his alternative history, 1812: The Rivers of War (2005), the 'Confederacy of the Arkansas' is thriving on the alliance of its Native American and African-American citizens. The independent nation puzzles Northerners but affronts slavery-bound Southerners, who are determined to put these inferior races in their place. Having finagled his way into the White House, a cynical, self-assured Henry Clay launches an invasion of the upstart country, while brawling frontiersman Andrew Jackson and New England intellectual John Quincy Adams become unlikely allies in a new political party based on individual rights. Flint deftly juggles historical details and asks important questions: if America had confronted its institutionalized racism earlier, could our Civil War have been prevented? And can enlightening firsthand experience overcome prejudice?" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"The sequel to 1812: The Rivers of War (2005) is Flint's finest and may become his most controversial book....A winner from start to finish." Booklist (Starred Review)

Review:

"Most works of alternative history take as their point of departure the Civil War or World War II, but Flint has shown here that other eras are equally fertile soil for a writer with the imagination and skill to tackle them. Recommended..." Library Journal

Synopsis:

In the hotly contested Presidential Election of 1824, Speaker of the House Henry Clay ruthlessly maneuvers events in order to emerge as the new President of the United States. His political machinations, however, push the nation onto the brink of national crisis, as Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams form a political alliance against Clay and his fractions. In order to divert the nations's attention, Clay launces a war against the Confederacy of the Arkansas — the allilance of Indians, black freedmen, and escaped slaves whose birth we witnessed in 1812: The Rivers of War. The final result of the Arkansas War will forever transform the American landscape.

Synopsis:

In this alternative history, during the hotly contested Presidential Election of 1824, Speaker of the House Henry Clay ruthlessly maneuvers events in order to emerge as the new President. Clay launches a war against the Confederacy of the Arkansas — the alliance of Indians, black freedmen, and escaped slaves.

About the Author

Eric Flint is the acclaimed author of the alternate history novels The Rivers of War, 1634: The Galileo Affair, and 1632, as well as Mother of Demons, which was selected by Science Fiction Chronicle as one of the best novels of the year. He has collaborated with David Drake on five novels in the acclaimed Belisarius series. He graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from UCLA with a degree in African history. A longtime labor union activist, he lives in northwest Indiana with his wife, Lucille.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780345465696
Author:
Flint, Eric
Publisher:
Del Rey
Subject:
History
Subject:
Indians of north america
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Alternative History
Publication Date:
20061128
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
9.52x6.70x1.25 in. 1.67 lbs.

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1824: The Arkansas War Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 448 pages Del Rey Books - English 9780345465696 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In Flint's skillful, provocative sequel to his alternative history, 1812: The Rivers of War (2005), the 'Confederacy of the Arkansas' is thriving on the alliance of its Native American and African-American citizens. The independent nation puzzles Northerners but affronts slavery-bound Southerners, who are determined to put these inferior races in their place. Having finagled his way into the White House, a cynical, self-assured Henry Clay launches an invasion of the upstart country, while brawling frontiersman Andrew Jackson and New England intellectual John Quincy Adams become unlikely allies in a new political party based on individual rights. Flint deftly juggles historical details and asks important questions: if America had confronted its institutionalized racism earlier, could our Civil War have been prevented? And can enlightening firsthand experience overcome prejudice? (Nov. 28)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright © Reed Business Information)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In Flint's skillful, provocative sequel to his alternative history, 1812: The Rivers of War (2005), the 'Confederacy of the Arkansas' is thriving on the alliance of its Native American and African-American citizens. The independent nation puzzles Northerners but affronts slavery-bound Southerners, who are determined to put these inferior races in their place. Having finagled his way into the White House, a cynical, self-assured Henry Clay launches an invasion of the upstart country, while brawling frontiersman Andrew Jackson and New England intellectual John Quincy Adams become unlikely allies in a new political party based on individual rights. Flint deftly juggles historical details and asks important questions: if America had confronted its institutionalized racism earlier, could our Civil War have been prevented? And can enlightening firsthand experience overcome prejudice?" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "The sequel to 1812: The Rivers of War (2005) is Flint's finest and may become his most controversial book....A winner from start to finish."
"Review" by , "Most works of alternative history take as their point of departure the Civil War or World War II, but Flint has shown here that other eras are equally fertile soil for a writer with the imagination and skill to tackle them. Recommended..."
"Synopsis" by , In the hotly contested Presidential Election of 1824, Speaker of the House Henry Clay ruthlessly maneuvers events in order to emerge as the new President of the United States. His political machinations, however, push the nation onto the brink of national crisis, as Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams form a political alliance against Clay and his fractions. In order to divert the nations's attention, Clay launces a war against the Confederacy of the Arkansas — the allilance of Indians, black freedmen, and escaped slaves whose birth we witnessed in 1812: The Rivers of War. The final result of the Arkansas War will forever transform the American landscape.
"Synopsis" by , In this alternative history, during the hotly contested Presidential Election of 1824, Speaker of the House Henry Clay ruthlessly maneuvers events in order to emerge as the new President. Clay launches a war against the Confederacy of the Arkansas — the alliance of Indians, black freedmen, and escaped slaves.
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