No Words Wasted Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Interviews | January 9, 2015

    Chris Faatz: IMG Jill Maxick of Prometheus Books: The Powells.com Interview



    For decades, Prometheus Books has put out titles we both love and respect. Prometheus is the leading publisher in the United States of books on free... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$8.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Nature Studies- Fish
1 Burnside Oceanography- Fisheries

The Last Fish Tale: The Fate of the Atlantic and Survival in Gloucester, America's Oldest Fishing Port and Most Original Town

by

The Last Fish Tale: The Fate of the Atlantic and Survival in Gloucester, America's Oldest Fishing Port and Most Original Town Cover

ISBN13: 9780345487278
ISBN10: 0345487273
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 2 left in stock at $8.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The bestselling author of Cod, Salt, and The Big Oyster has enthralled readers with his incisive blend of culinary, cultural, and social history. Now, in his most colorful, personal, and important book to date, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a disappearing way of life: fishing — how it has thrived in and defined one particular town for centuries, and what its imperiled future means for the rest of the world.

The culture of fishing is vanishing, and consequently, coastal societies are changing in unprecedented ways. The once thriving fishing communities of Rockport, Nantucket, Newport, Mystic, and many other coastal towns from Newfoundland to Florida and along the West Coast have been forced to abandon their roots and become tourist destinations instead. Gloucester, Massachusetts, however, is a rare survivor. The livelihood of America's oldest fishing port has always been rooted in the life and culture of commercial fishing.

The Gloucester story began in 1004 with the arrival of the Vikings. Six hundred years later, Captain John Smith championed the bountiful waters off the coast of Gloucester, convincing new settlers to come to the area and start a new way of life. Gloucester became the most productive fishery in New England, its people prospering from the seemingly endless supply of cod and halibut. With the introduction of a faster fishing boat — the schooner — the industry flourished. In the 20th century, the arrival of Portuguese, Jews, and Sicilians turned the bustling center into a melting pot. Artists and writers such as Edward Hopper, Winslow Homer, and T. S. Eliot came to the fishing town and found inspiration.

But the vital life of Gloucester was being threatened. Ominous signs were seen with the development of engine-powered net-dragging vessels in the first decade of the 20th century. As early as 1911, Gloucester fishermen warned of the dire consequences of this new technology. Since then, these vessels have become even larger and more efficient, and today the resulting overfishing, along with climate change and pollution, portends the extinction of the very species that fishermen depend on to survive, and of a way of life special not only to Gloucester but to coastal cities all over the world. And yet, according to Kurlansky, it doesn't have to be this way. Scientists, government regulators, and fishermen are trying to work out complex formulas to keep fishing alive.

Engagingly written and filled with rich history, delicious anecdotes, colorful characters, and local recipes, The Last Fish Tale is Kurlansky's most urgent story, a heartfelt tribute to what he calls socio-diversity and a lament that each culture, each way of life that vanishes, diminishes the richness of civilization.

Review:

"Bestselling author Kurlansky (Cod; The Big Oyster) provides a delightful, intimate history and contemporary portrait of the quintessential northeastern coastal fishing town: Gloucester, Mass., on Cape Anne. Illustrated with his own beautifully executed drawings, Kurlansky's book vividly depicts the contemporary tension between the traditional fishing trade and modern commerce, which in Gloucester means beach-going tourists. One year ago, a beach preservation group enraged fishermen by seeking to harvest 105 acres of prime fishing ground for sand to deposit on the shoreline. Wealthy yacht owners compete with fishermen for prime dockage, driving up prices. Fishermen also contend with federal limits on their catches in an effort to maintain sustainable fisheries. But while cod are protected from extinction, the fishermen are not. Some boats must go 100 or more miles out to sea — a danger for small boats with few crew members. Tragedies abound, while one, that of the swordfish boat Andrea Gail, documented by Sebastian Junger in A Perfect Storm, brought even more tourists to Gloucester. (June 3)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

Bursting with ironies, Mark Kurlansky's epic history of Gloucester sweeps from the 17th century, when English colonists starved amid the world's greatest marine abundance, to the 21st century, when opulent resorts line the coast of a depleted ocean. As Kurlansky tells us at the outset, "A fish tale exaggerates to make things look bigger. It is triumphal." But he calls this book a "Gloucester story,"... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Kurlansky...manages not only to give readers a history of the town and a real feel for the place, but to provide a primer on ocean ecology, a detailed description of the worldwide fishing industry, and a rather glum assessment of where Gloucester and its ilk might be headed." Providence Journal

Review:

"Kurlansky's knack for selecting just the right story to illustrate his points is impressive." Miami Herald

Review:

"A lucent addition to Gloucester's town treasury, featuring a wealth of dramatic stories." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

From the New York Times-bestselling author of Cod, Salt, and The Big Oyster comes the colorful story of a way of life that for hundreds of years has defined much of America's coastlines but is slowly disappearing. Illustrated.

About the Author

Mark Kurlansky is the New York Times bestselling and James A. Beard Award-winning author of many books, including Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World; Salt: A World History; 1968: The Year That Rocked the World; The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell; and Nonviolence: The History of a Dangerous Idea, as well as the novel Boogaloo on 2nd Avenue. He is the winner of a Bon Appetit American Food and Entertaining Award for Food Writer of the Year, and the Glenfiddich Food and Drink Award for Food Book of the year, as well as a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. He lives in New York City.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Tanya Reynolds, March 12, 2009 (view all comments by Tanya Reynolds)
Kurlansky always makes me forget I'm reading nonfiction. Instead I crave seafood and abhor the Gloucester tourists. A great read for anyone who lives near the sea, or has ever cast a fishing rod, or has ever eaten seafood, or has ever breathed air.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(6 of 6 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780345487278
Subtitle:
The Fate of the Atlantic and Survival in Gloucester, America's Oldest Fishing Port and Most Original Town
Author:
Kurlansky, Mark
Publisher:
Ballantine Books
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Fisheries & Aquaculture
Subject:
United States - State & Local - New England
Subject:
Fisheries -- Massachusetts -- Gloucester.
Subject:
Fishing ports - Massachusetts - Gloucester -
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20080603
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
BandW ILLUSTRATIONS THROUGHOUT
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8.10x6.02x.96 in. .96 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. Genesis: Translation and Commentary Used Trade Paper $10.00
  2. The Spy Who Came for Christmas Used Trade Paper $5.95
  3. Escape from the Deep: The Epic Story... Used Hardcover $4.50
  4. Celine Dion: Let's Talk about Love...
    Used Trade Paper $12.00
  5. The call of solitude :alonetime in a... Used Hardcover $4.95
  6. Cod: A Biography of the Fish That...
    Used Trade Paper $7.95

Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » Historical Food and Cooking
History and Social Science » Americana » New England and Mid Atlantic
History and Social Science » World History » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Fish
Science and Mathematics » Oceanography » Fisheries

The Last Fish Tale: The Fate of the Atlantic and Survival in Gloucester, America's Oldest Fishing Port and Most Original Town Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Ballantine Books - English 9780345487278 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Bestselling author Kurlansky (Cod; The Big Oyster) provides a delightful, intimate history and contemporary portrait of the quintessential northeastern coastal fishing town: Gloucester, Mass., on Cape Anne. Illustrated with his own beautifully executed drawings, Kurlansky's book vividly depicts the contemporary tension between the traditional fishing trade and modern commerce, which in Gloucester means beach-going tourists. One year ago, a beach preservation group enraged fishermen by seeking to harvest 105 acres of prime fishing ground for sand to deposit on the shoreline. Wealthy yacht owners compete with fishermen for prime dockage, driving up prices. Fishermen also contend with federal limits on their catches in an effort to maintain sustainable fisheries. But while cod are protected from extinction, the fishermen are not. Some boats must go 100 or more miles out to sea — a danger for small boats with few crew members. Tragedies abound, while one, that of the swordfish boat Andrea Gail, documented by Sebastian Junger in A Perfect Storm, brought even more tourists to Gloucester. (June 3)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Kurlansky...manages not only to give readers a history of the town and a real feel for the place, but to provide a primer on ocean ecology, a detailed description of the worldwide fishing industry, and a rather glum assessment of where Gloucester and its ilk might be headed."
"Review" by , "Kurlansky's knack for selecting just the right story to illustrate his points is impressive."
"Review" by , "A lucent addition to Gloucester's town treasury, featuring a wealth of dramatic stories."
"Synopsis" by , From the New York Times-bestselling author of Cod, Salt, and The Big Oyster comes the colorful story of a way of life that for hundreds of years has defined much of America's coastlines but is slowly disappearing. Illustrated.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.