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Back to Our Future: How the 1980s Explain the World We Live in Now -- Our Culture, Our Politics, Our Everything

by

Back to Our Future: How the 1980s Explain the World We Live in Now -- Our Culture, Our Politics, Our Everything Cover

ISBN13: 9780345518781
ISBN10: 0345518780
Condition:
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Wall Street scandals. Fights over taxes. Racial resentments. A Lakers-Celtics championship. The Karate Kid topping the box-office charts. Bon Jovi touring the country. These words could describe our current moment — or the vaunted iconography of three decades past.

In this wide-ranging and wickedly entertaining book, New York Times bestselling journalist David Sirota takes readers on a rollicking DeLorean ride back in time to reveal how so many of our present-day conflicts are rooted in the larger-than-life pop culture of the 1980s — from the "Greed is good" ethos of Gordon Gekko (and Bernie Madoff) to the "Make my day" foreign policy of Ronald Reagan (and George W. Bush) to the "transcendence" of Cliff Huxtable (and Barack Obama).

Today's mindless militarism and hypernarcissism, Sirota argues, first became the norm when an '80s generation weaned on Rambo one-liners and "Just Do It" exhortations embraced a new religion — with comic books, cartoons, sneaker commercials, videogames, and even children's toys serving as the key instruments of cultural indoctrination. Meanwhile, in productions such as Back to the Future, Family Ties, and The Big Chill, a campaign was launched to reimagine the 1950s as America's lost golden age and vilify the 1960s as the source of all our troubles. That 1980s revisionism, Sirota shows, still rages today, with Barack Obama cast as the 60s hippie being assailed by Alex P. Keaton–esque Republicans who long for a return to Eisenhower-era conservatism.

"The past is never dead," William Faulkner wrote. "It's not even past." The 1980s — even more so. With the native dexterity only a child of the Atari Age could possess, David Sirota twists and turns this multicolored Rubik's Cube of a decade, exposing it as a warning for our own troubled present — and possible future.

Review:

"Sirota (The Uprising) ushers readers back to the era of big money and bigger hair, the yuppie and the Gipper to show how the 1980s transformed — and continues to influence — America's culture and politics. As Carter's presidency began to crumble in 1978, a revival of back-to-the-'50s theater, television, and film productions (Grease, Happy Days, La Bamba) overtook grittier 1960s imagery of 'urbanity, ethnicity and strife' and came to define the Reagan era in a country eager to forget — or unwilling to learn from — the failure of Vietnam. Sirota argues that the combination of Reagan, the 'candidate of nostalgia'; hypermilitarist movies that re-demonized communism; and sophisticated marketing campaigns glorifying the cult of the individual led to our current culture's narcissism and obsessive pursuit of wealth and celebrity. In his effort to fit current trends to his overriding thesis, Sirota occasionally makes some sweeping statements, such as claiming the military's public relations campaign was so successful that Americans 'never dare question' the military, ignoring the numerous anti — Iraq War protests and the outrage over the Abu Ghraib photographs. But the many of his arguments are well informed and sparkle with wit and irreverence. (Mar.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Review:

"Sirota makes a compelling case that 1980s culture and politics have an outsized influence on how we think now. To build his case, he apparently hacked my brain and downloaded my entire age-7-to-age-17 cultural intake. From Rerun Stubbs on 'What's Happening' to the 'Missile Command' videogame, the roots of how we think now are there. Scary. Wildly entertaining — and scary." Rachel Maddow, host The Rachel Maddow Show

Review:

"I went into Back to Our Future thinking that I had grown up in an era of endearingly mindless pop-culture entertainments, and came out of it convinced that from my childhood on I had been fed an almost endless stream of ruthless mind-bending propaganda of a sort that would have made the Soviets sick with jealousy. David's book is simultaneously hilarious and horrifying. The part that freaked me out was how at the end of reading this thing you feel (and here I'm using a metaphor pertinent to the subject matter) like Sean Young's replicant character in Blade Runner, sick to discover that the harmless memories you thought were your own were actually planted there by some sick committee of totalitarian bureaucrats. You'll never think of Mr. T the same way." Matt Taibbi, author of Griftopia: Bubble Machines, Vampire Squids, and the Long Con That Is Breaking America

Review:

"An irreverent, astute and provocative look at the ways in which the culture of the 'Me' decade shaped three decades of me first politics. People may think we live in the age of Reagan, but really it's the age of Alex P Keaton." Christopher Hayes, editor of The Nation

Review:

"Max Headroom, Ferris Bueler and Alex Keaton... Self centered capitalistic narcissists or fun pop culture icons? David Sirota cracks this mystery. Well not really a mystery.... Just read the book." Adam McKay, director and writer of Anchorman

About the Author

David Sirota is a journalist, nationally syndicated weekly newspaper columnist, and radio host. His weekly column is based at The Denver Post, San Francisco Chronicle, Portland Oregonian, and The Seattle Times and now appears in newspapers with a combined daily circulation of more than 1.6 million readers. He has contributed to The New York Times Magazine and The Nation and hosts an award-winning daily talk show on Denver's Clear Channel affiliate, KKZN-AM760. He is a senior editor at In These Times magazine and a Huffington Post contributor and appears periodically on CNN, The Colbert Report, PBS, and NPR. He received a degree in journalism and political science from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism. He lives in Denver with his wife, Emily, and their dog, Monty.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

Ula, January 1, 2012 (view all comments by Ula)
I reviewed this back in September when I read it and it still holds true. This was my favorite book I read in 2011 so it's definitely my Puddly Award nomination.

The title pretty much describes the book but what it doesn't say is how terrifying that is. I will shamelessly steal Matt Taibbi's review on the back of book because he nails it. "I went into BtoF thinking that I had grown up in an era of endearingly mindless pop-culture entertainments, and came out of it convinced that from my childhood on I had been fed an almost endless stream of ruthless mind-bending propaganda of a sort that would have made the Soviets sick with jealousy." Holy shit, it's terrifying. You know that Simpsons episode where Lisa finds out the navy has been doing recruiting through subliminal messages in boy band pop lyrics? Well it turns out that's kind of true! Sirota goes through the pop culture of the 80s to show how it's created our present day hyper-militarism in crazy detail. He also touches on how it has created our inability to discuss race ever in any way in the "post-racial i don't see color" way. That section is not quite as long and detailed as dealing with the "with us or against us" militarism but you can't really discuss our obsession with war and blowing things up without talking about how we can demonize and objectify Muslims (and really, anyone from the Middle East, or that looks like they could be from there). Utterly terrifying. Highly recommended.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Ula, September 5, 2011 (view all comments by Ula)
The title pretty much describes the book but what it doesn't say is how terrifying that is. I will shamelessly steal Matt Taibbi's review on the back of book because he nails it. "I went into BtoF thinking that I had grown up in an era of endearingly mindless pop-culture entertainments, and came out of it convinced that from my childhood on I had been fed an almost endless stream of ruthless mind-bending propaganda of a sort that would have made the Soviets sick with jealousy." Holy shit, it's terrifying. You know that Simpsons episode where Lisa finds out the navy has been doing recruiting through subliminal messages in boy band pop lyrics? Well it turns out that's kind of true! Sirota goes through the pop culture of the 80s to show how it's created our present day hyper-militarism in crazy detail. He also touches on how it has created our inability to discuss race ever in any way in the "post-racial i don't see color" way. That section is not quite as long and detailed as dealing with the "with us or against us" militarism but you can't really discuss our obsession with war and blowing things up without talking about how we can demonize and objectify Muslims (and really, anyone from the Middle East, or that looks like they could be from there). Utterly terrifying. Highly recommended.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Purple Girl, March 26, 2011 (view all comments by Purple Girl)
this should be on the 'Required Reading List' of every Sociology and Constitutional Law student. It not only explains what happened to U.S., but the fact it was done with forethought...thus malice.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780345518781
Author:
Sirota, David
Publisher:
Ballantine Books
Subject:
Modern - General
Subject:
US History - 20th Century
Publication Date:
20110331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9.5 x 6.3 x 1.1 in 1.1188 lb

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » General
Featured Titles » History and Social Science
History and Social Science » American Studies » 80s to Present
History and Social Science » American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » American Studies
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Back to Our Future: How the 1980s Explain the World We Live in Now -- Our Culture, Our Politics, Our Everything Sale Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.50 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Ballantine Books - English 9780345518781 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Sirota (The Uprising) ushers readers back to the era of big money and bigger hair, the yuppie and the Gipper to show how the 1980s transformed — and continues to influence — America's culture and politics. As Carter's presidency began to crumble in 1978, a revival of back-to-the-'50s theater, television, and film productions (Grease, Happy Days, La Bamba) overtook grittier 1960s imagery of 'urbanity, ethnicity and strife' and came to define the Reagan era in a country eager to forget — or unwilling to learn from — the failure of Vietnam. Sirota argues that the combination of Reagan, the 'candidate of nostalgia'; hypermilitarist movies that re-demonized communism; and sophisticated marketing campaigns glorifying the cult of the individual led to our current culture's narcissism and obsessive pursuit of wealth and celebrity. In his effort to fit current trends to his overriding thesis, Sirota occasionally makes some sweeping statements, such as claiming the military's public relations campaign was so successful that Americans 'never dare question' the military, ignoring the numerous anti — Iraq War protests and the outrage over the Abu Ghraib photographs. But the many of his arguments are well informed and sparkle with wit and irreverence. (Mar.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Review" by , "Sirota makes a compelling case that 1980s culture and politics have an outsized influence on how we think now. To build his case, he apparently hacked my brain and downloaded my entire age-7-to-age-17 cultural intake. From Rerun Stubbs on 'What's Happening' to the 'Missile Command' videogame, the roots of how we think now are there. Scary. Wildly entertaining — and scary."
"Review" by , "I went into Back to Our Future thinking that I had grown up in an era of endearingly mindless pop-culture entertainments, and came out of it convinced that from my childhood on I had been fed an almost endless stream of ruthless mind-bending propaganda of a sort that would have made the Soviets sick with jealousy. David's book is simultaneously hilarious and horrifying. The part that freaked me out was how at the end of reading this thing you feel (and here I'm using a metaphor pertinent to the subject matter) like Sean Young's replicant character in Blade Runner, sick to discover that the harmless memories you thought were your own were actually planted there by some sick committee of totalitarian bureaucrats. You'll never think of Mr. T the same way." Matt Taibbi, author of Griftopia: Bubble Machines, Vampire Squids, and the Long Con That Is Breaking America
"Review" by , "An irreverent, astute and provocative look at the ways in which the culture of the 'Me' decade shaped three decades of me first politics. People may think we live in the age of Reagan, but really it's the age of Alex P Keaton."
"Review" by , "Max Headroom, Ferris Bueler and Alex Keaton... Self centered capitalistic narcissists or fun pop culture icons? David Sirota cracks this mystery. Well not really a mystery.... Just read the book."
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