The Fictioning
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | September 17, 2014

    Merritt Tierce: IMG Has My Husband Read It?



    My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »

    spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

The Imprisoned Guest: Samuel Howe and Laura Bridgman, the Original Deaf-Blind Girl

The Imprisoned Guest: Samuel Howe and Laura Bridgman, the Original Deaf-Blind Girl Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In 1837, Samuel Gridley Howe, the ambitious director of Boston's Perkins Institution for the Blind, heard about Laura Bridgman, a bright deaf-blind seven-year-old, the daughter of New Hampshire farmers. He resolved to dazzle the world by rescuing her from the "darkness and silence of the tomb." And indeed, thanks to Howe and an extraordinary group of female teachers, Laura learned to finger-spell, to read raised letters, and to write legibly and even eloquently.

Philosophers, poets, educators, theologians, and early psychologists hailed Laura as a moral inspiration and a living laboratory for the most controversial ideas of the day. She quickly became a major tourist attraction, and many influential writers and reformers—Carlyle, Dickens, and Hawthorne among them—visited her or wrote about her. But as the Civil War loomed and her girlish appeal faded, the public began to lose interest. By the time Laura died in 1889, she had been wholly eclipsed by Helen Keller.

The Imprisoned Guest recovers Laura Bridgman's forgotten life, placing it in the context of nineteenth-century American social, intellectual, and cultural history. Her troubling, tumultuous relationship with Howe, who rode her achievements to his own fame but could not cope with the intense, demanding adult she became, sheds light on the contradictory attitudes of a reform era in which we can find some precursors to our own.

Synopsis:

In 1837, Samuel Gridley Howe set about rescuing Laura Bridgman, a deaf-blind seven-year-old, from the "darkness and silence of the tomb." Bridgman learned to finger-spell, to read raised letters, to write legibly and even eloquently, and became a living exhibit for contemporary theological and psychological debates, with influential writers and reformers — Carlyle, Dickens, and Hawthorne among them — visiting or writing about her. But by her death in 1889, she had been wholly eclipsed by the prettier, more ingratiating Helen Keller. The Imprisoned Guest is an absorbing, inspiring account of an extraordinary life.

About the Author

Elisabeth Gitter is a professor of English at the City University of New York's John Jay College who specializes in the Victorian era.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374117382
Subtitle:
Samuel Howe and Laura Bridgman, The Original Deaf-Blind Girl
Author:
Gitter, Elisabeth
Publisher:
Picador
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Educators
Subject:
Historical - U.S.
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Special Education - Physically Handicapped
Subject:
Specific Groups - Special Needs
Subject:
Teachers of the blind-deaf.
Subject:
Blind-deaf women
Subject:
Historical
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series Volume:
105-846
Publication Date:
20020801
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Plus one 8-page bandw photo insert
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9.29x6.25x1.13 in. 1.34 lbs.

Related Subjects

Languages » Deaf Studies » Being Blind and Deaf

The Imprisoned Guest: Samuel Howe and Laura Bridgman, the Original Deaf-Blind Girl
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 352 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374117382 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In 1837, Samuel Gridley Howe set about rescuing Laura Bridgman, a deaf-blind seven-year-old, from the "darkness and silence of the tomb." Bridgman learned to finger-spell, to read raised letters, to write legibly and even eloquently, and became a living exhibit for contemporary theological and psychological debates, with influential writers and reformers — Carlyle, Dickens, and Hawthorne among them — visiting or writing about her. But by her death in 1889, she had been wholly eclipsed by the prettier, more ingratiating Helen Keller. The Imprisoned Guest is an absorbing, inspiring account of an extraordinary life.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.