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The Devil's Larder

The Devil's Larder Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A sumptuous, scintillating stew of sixty four short fictions about appetite, food, and the objects of our desire All great meals, it has been said, lead to discussions of either sex or death, and The Devil's Larder, in typical Cracean fashion, leads to both. Here are sixty four short fictions of at times Joycean beauty — about schoolgirls hunting for razor clams in the strand; or searching for soup-stones to take out the fishiness of fish but to preserve the flavor of the sea; or about a mother and daughter tasting food in one another's mouth to see if people really do taste things differently — and at other times, of Mephistophelean mischief: about the woman who seasoned her food with the remains of her cremated cat, and later, her husband, only to hear a voice singing from her stomach (you can't swallow grief, she was advised); or the restaurant known as "The Air & Light," the place to be in this small coastal town that serves as the backdrop for Crace's gastronomic flights of fancy, but where no food or beverage is actually served, though a 12 percent surcharge is imposed just for just sitting there and being seen.

Food for thought in the best sense of the term, The Devil's Larder is another delectable work of fiction by a 2001 winner of The National Book Critics Circle Award.

Review:

"These fables are five-finger exercises simple, enjoyable." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"One of the brightest lights in contemporary British fiction." Charles Johnson, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Crace is adept at creating unexpected worlds. In this tasty little collection, he has created many — 64, to be exact. From the grandmother who tears off a bit of dough 'for the angel' to the adventurers who risk a tiresome, slightly surreal hike to dine at an inexplicably famous restaurant to the manager who devises an ultimately self-defeating means of keeping his waiters from sampling what they are serving. Crace's tales all concern the relationship between people and food. Quirky, unsettling, and sometimes slightly macabre...they are little scenes that capture the oddness of being human from a particular angle." Library Journal

Review:

"While recalling Donald Barthelme's 40 Stories, the fictions also borrow from Primo Levi's The Periodic Table and Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities, though their fragmentary range, and mischievous, smirking delights, are characteristically Crace's....Disquieting yet somehow affirming, this is poetic manna for the imaginative soul, and if not from heaven, then from an even more tempting, voluptuous recess." David Vincent, The Guardian

Review:

"[T]he book's revelation is a truth each of us lives and repeats every day of our lives: food is the one thing we both take for granted and exalt." Booklist

About the Author

Jim Crace is the author, most recently, of Quarantine, which won the Whitbread Novel of the Year Award, and Being Dead, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction. He lives in Birmingham, England.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374138592
Subtitle:
A Feast
Publisher:
Picador
Author:
Crace, Jim
Location:
New York
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Short Stories (single author)
Subject:
Gastronomy
Subject:
Short stories
Subject:
Food habits
Subject:
Dinners and dining
Edition Number:
1st American ed.
Edition Description:
American
Series Volume:
199'81
Publication Date:
20020907
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
7.26x5.60x.76 in. .65 lbs.

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Devil's Larder
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 176 pages Picador - English 9780374138592 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "These fables are five-finger exercises simple, enjoyable." Publishers Weekly
"Review" by , "One of the brightest lights in contemporary British fiction."
"Review" by , "Crace is adept at creating unexpected worlds. In this tasty little collection, he has created many — 64, to be exact. From the grandmother who tears off a bit of dough 'for the angel' to the adventurers who risk a tiresome, slightly surreal hike to dine at an inexplicably famous restaurant to the manager who devises an ultimately self-defeating means of keeping his waiters from sampling what they are serving. Crace's tales all concern the relationship between people and food. Quirky, unsettling, and sometimes slightly macabre...they are little scenes that capture the oddness of being human from a particular angle."
"Review" by , "While recalling Donald Barthelme's 40 Stories, the fictions also borrow from Primo Levi's The Periodic Table and Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities, though their fragmentary range, and mischievous, smirking delights, are characteristically Crace's....Disquieting yet somehow affirming, this is poetic manna for the imaginative soul, and if not from heaven, then from an even more tempting, voluptuous recess."
"Review" by , "[T]he book's revelation is a truth each of us lives and repeats every day of our lives: food is the one thing we both take for granted and exalt."
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