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The Guardians: An Elegy

The Guardians: An Elegy Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Guardians opens with a story from the July 24, 2008, edition of the Riverdale Press that begins, “An unidentified white man was struck and instantly killed by a Metro-North train last night as it pulled into the station on West 254th Street.” Sarah Manguso writes: “The trains engineer told the police that the man was alone and that he jumped. The police officers pulled the body from the track and found no identification. The trains 425 passengers were transferred to another train and delayed about twenty minutes.”

The Guardians is an elegy for Mangusos friend Harris, two years after he escaped from a psychiatric hospital and jumped under that train. The narrative contemplates with unrelenting clarity their crowded postcollege apartment, Mangusos fellowship year in Rome, Harriss death and the year that followed—the year of mourning and the year of Mangusos marriage. As Harris is revealed both to the reader and to the narrator, the book becomes a monument to their intimacy and inability to express their love to each other properly, and to the reverberating effects of Harriss presence in and absence from Mangusos life. There is grief in the book but also humor, as Manguso marvels at the unexpected details that constitute a friendship. The Guardians explores the insufficiency of explanation and the necessity of the imagination in making sense of anything.

Review:

"In 2008, Harris Wulfson, Manguso's longtime friend, walked out of a mental hospital and into the path of an oncoming train. It was two days before his body was identified. In this affecting narrative, poet and writer Manguso (The Two Kinds of Decay) threads selected remembrances into an elegy — for Harris, who was a musician and composer, kind and funny and capable of behaving badly, but also an elegy for youth, that time of unstable arrangements and shifting roommates; for Manguso's past, filled with illness and suicidal thoughts; and, perhaps most of all, for a friendship. Manguso reminds us that long friendships are a palimpsest of love and disappointment and memory; old friends are a compass for one's life. Manguso puzzles over the thought of what becomes of a friend after death? as well as feelings of grief, guilt, and anger, and what separates the mentally ill from the rest of us (less than we think, she concludes). In the end, Manguso writes with assured and poetic prose." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

“An unidentified white man was struck and instantly killed by a Metro-North train last night,” reported the July 24, 2008, edition of the Riverdale Press. This man was named Harris, and The Guardians—written in the years after he escaped from a psychiatric hospital and ended his life—is Sarah Mangusos heartbreaking elegy.

Harris was a man who “played music, wrote software, wrote music, learned to drive, went to college, went to bed with girls.” In The Guardians, Manguso grieves not for family or for a lover, but for a best friend. With startling humor and candor, she paints a portrait of a friendship between a man and a woman—in all its unexpected detail—and shows that love and grief do not always take the shapes we expect them to.

About the Author

Sarah Manguso is the author of a memoir, The Two Kinds of Decay; two books of poetry, Siste Viator and The Captain Lands in Paradise; and a short-story collection, Hard to Admit and Harder to Escape.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374167240
Subtitle:
An Elegy for a Friend
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Author:
Manguso, Sarah
Subject:
Biography - General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20120228
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Notes/Bibliography
Pages:
128
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

Related Subjects

Biography » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Sociology » Suicide

The Guardians: An Elegy
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 128 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374167240 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In 2008, Harris Wulfson, Manguso's longtime friend, walked out of a mental hospital and into the path of an oncoming train. It was two days before his body was identified. In this affecting narrative, poet and writer Manguso (The Two Kinds of Decay) threads selected remembrances into an elegy — for Harris, who was a musician and composer, kind and funny and capable of behaving badly, but also an elegy for youth, that time of unstable arrangements and shifting roommates; for Manguso's past, filled with illness and suicidal thoughts; and, perhaps most of all, for a friendship. Manguso reminds us that long friendships are a palimpsest of love and disappointment and memory; old friends are a compass for one's life. Manguso puzzles over the thought of what becomes of a friend after death? as well as feelings of grief, guilt, and anger, and what separates the mentally ill from the rest of us (less than we think, she concludes). In the end, Manguso writes with assured and poetic prose." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,

“An unidentified white man was struck and instantly killed by a Metro-North train last night,” reported the July 24, 2008, edition of the Riverdale Press. This man was named Harris, and The Guardians—written in the years after he escaped from a psychiatric hospital and ended his life—is Sarah Mangusos heartbreaking elegy.

Harris was a man who “played music, wrote software, wrote music, learned to drive, went to college, went to bed with girls.” In The Guardians, Manguso grieves not for family or for a lover, but for a best friend. With startling humor and candor, she paints a portrait of a friendship between a man and a woman—in all its unexpected detail—and shows that love and grief do not always take the shapes we expect them to.

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