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Original Essays | April 11, 2014

Paul Laudiero: IMG Shit Rough Draft



I was sitting in a British and Irish romantic drama class my last semester in college when the idea for Shit Rough Drafts hit me. I was working... Continue »
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This title in other editions

La Folie Baudelaire

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La Folie Baudelaire Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In La Folie Baudelaire, Roberto Calasso—one of the most original and acclaimed writers on literature, art, culture, and mythology—turns his attention to the poets and writers of Paris in the nineteenth century who created what was later called “the Modern.” His protagonist is Charles Baudelaire: poet of “nerves,” art love, pioneering critic, man about Paris. Calasso ranges through Baudelaires life and work, focusing on two painters—Ingres and Delacroix—about whom Baudelaire wrote acutely, and then turns to Degas and Manet, who followed in the tracks Baudelaire laid down in his great essay The Painter of Modern Life. In Calassos lavishly illustrated mosaic of stories, insights, close readings of poems, and commentaries on paintings, Baudelaires Paris comes brilliantly to life.

            In the eighteenth century, a Folie was a garden pavilion set aside for people of leisure, a place of delight and fantasy. Following Baudelaire, Calasso has created a brilliant and dramatic “Folie Baudelaire”—a place where the reader can encounter the poet himself, his peers, his city, and his extraordinary likes and dislikes, finally discovering that that places is situated in the middle of the land of “absolute literature.”

Review:

"Calasso (The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony) takes seriously Charles Baudelaire's self-described desire 'to glorify the cult of images.' Accordingly, he uses the great poet and art critic's studies of painters as his point of departure for a delightful tour of the mid-19th- century Parisian art scene. Calasso's book resembles one of Baudelaire's Salons (his volumes of art criticism) writ large. 'To write a Salon,' Calasso asserts, is to allow 'a sequence of images... that represent... the most disparate moments in life....' Calasso makes use of Baudelaire's contemporaries, providing close studies of, and wry musings on, the painters Ingres, Degas, and Manet, as well as the critic Sainte-Beuve. The wayward and episodic nature of the writing, as well as the wealth of background information, allows the characteristics of late modernity to emerge: the rise of the bourgeoisie, the saturation of images with the flowering of public advertisement, a belief in the progressive spread of enlightenment, a time (the Second Empire) when 'everything could be accepted as parody.' Calasso's aim is to introduce us not only to Baudelaire's poetry and mind, but also to his time, and to make us realize that it remains our own. B&w illus. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A spectacular act of close reading and looking by a great writer

In La Folie Baudelaire, Roberto Calasso—one of the most original and acclaimed writers on literature, art, culture, and mythology—turns his attention to the poets and writers of Paris in the nineteenth century who created what was later called “the Modern.” His protagonist is Charles Baudelaire: poet of “nerves,” art lover, pioneering critic, man about Paris. Calasso ranges through Baudelaires life and work, focusing on two painters—Ingres and Delacroix—about whom Baudelaire wrote acutely, and then turns to Degas and Manet, who followed in the tracks Baudelaire laid down in his great essay “The Painter of Modern Life.” In Calassos lavishly illustrated mosaic of stories, insights, close readings of poems, and commentaries on paintings, Baudelaires Paris comes brilliantly to life.

     In the eighteenth century, a folie was a garden pavilion set aside for people of leisure, a place of delight and fantasy. Following Baudelaire, Calasso has created a brilliant and dramatic “Folie Baudelaire”—a place where the reader can encounter the poet himself, his peers, his city, and his extraordinary likes and dislikes, finally discovering that that place is situated in the middle of the land of “absolute literature.”

About the Author

Roberto Calasso, publisher of Adelphi in Milan, is the author of many books, among them The Ruin of Kasch, The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony, Ka, K., and Tiepolo Pink.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374183349
Author:
Calasso, Roberto
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Author:
McEwen, Alastair
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
European - French
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20140513
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
40 Color Illustrations/12 Black-and-Whit
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » Literary
Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » Miscellaneous International Poetry
Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

La Folie Baudelaire New Hardcover
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$29.75 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374183349 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Calasso (The Marriage of Cadmus and Harmony) takes seriously Charles Baudelaire's self-described desire 'to glorify the cult of images.' Accordingly, he uses the great poet and art critic's studies of painters as his point of departure for a delightful tour of the mid-19th- century Parisian art scene. Calasso's book resembles one of Baudelaire's Salons (his volumes of art criticism) writ large. 'To write a Salon,' Calasso asserts, is to allow 'a sequence of images... that represent... the most disparate moments in life....' Calasso makes use of Baudelaire's contemporaries, providing close studies of, and wry musings on, the painters Ingres, Degas, and Manet, as well as the critic Sainte-Beuve. The wayward and episodic nature of the writing, as well as the wealth of background information, allows the characteristics of late modernity to emerge: the rise of the bourgeoisie, the saturation of images with the flowering of public advertisement, a belief in the progressive spread of enlightenment, a time (the Second Empire) when 'everything could be accepted as parody.' Calasso's aim is to introduce us not only to Baudelaire's poetry and mind, but also to his time, and to make us realize that it remains our own. B&w illus. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , A spectacular act of close reading and looking by a great writer

In La Folie Baudelaire, Roberto Calasso—one of the most original and acclaimed writers on literature, art, culture, and mythology—turns his attention to the poets and writers of Paris in the nineteenth century who created what was later called “the Modern.” His protagonist is Charles Baudelaire: poet of “nerves,” art lover, pioneering critic, man about Paris. Calasso ranges through Baudelaires life and work, focusing on two painters—Ingres and Delacroix—about whom Baudelaire wrote acutely, and then turns to Degas and Manet, who followed in the tracks Baudelaire laid down in his great essay “The Painter of Modern Life.” In Calassos lavishly illustrated mosaic of stories, insights, close readings of poems, and commentaries on paintings, Baudelaires Paris comes brilliantly to life.

     In the eighteenth century, a folie was a garden pavilion set aside for people of leisure, a place of delight and fantasy. Following Baudelaire, Calasso has created a brilliant and dramatic “Folie Baudelaire”—a place where the reader can encounter the poet himself, his peers, his city, and his extraordinary likes and dislikes, finally discovering that that place is situated in the middle of the land of “absolute literature.”

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