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2 Burnside Health and Medicine- Ear Nose and Throat

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Shouting Won't Help: Why I--And 50 Million Other Americans--Can't Hear You

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Shouting Won't Help: Why I--And 50 Million Other Americans--Can't Hear You Cover

ISBN13: 9780374263041
ISBN10: 0374263043
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For twenty-two years, Katherine Bouton had a secret that grew harder to keep every day. An editor at The New York Times, at daily editorial meetings she couldnt hear what her colleagues were saying. She had gone profoundly deaf in her left ear; her right was getting worse. As she once put it, she was “the kind of person who might have used an ear trumpet in the nineteenth century.”

Audiologists agree that were experiencing a national epidemic of hearing impairment. At present, 50 million Americans suffer some degree of hearing loss—17 percent of the population. And hearing loss is not exclusively a product of growing old. The usual onset is between the ages of nineteen and forty-four, and in many cases the cause is unknown.

Shouting Wont Help is a deftly written, deeply felt look at a widespread and misunderstood phenomenon. In the style of Jerome Groopman and Atul Gawande, and using her experience as a guide, Bouton examines the problem personally, psychologically, and physiologically. She speaks with doctors, audiologists, and neurobiologists, and with a variety of people afflicted with midlife hearing loss, braiding their stories with her own to illuminate the startling effects of the condition.

The result is a surprisingly engaging account of what its like to live with an invisible disability—and a robust prescription for our nations increasing problem with deafness.

A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013

Review:

"Though she's never been able to pinpoint the cause of her affliction, former New York Times senior editor Bouton remembers the day she began to lose her hearing and suddenly found herself among the ranks of the estimated 275 million people around the world with some type of hearing impairment. She recounts her story and expands it to include the experiences of others (each chapter closes with a profile of a person with a hearing disability, including a British opera singer, a psychoanalyst, and a professor), crafting a study rich in detail and broad in scope that touches on the intricacies of cochlear implants and the increasing amount of ambient noise in our society, as well as the shame, frustration, and guilt the hearing impaired face in the workplace and in private conversation. This 360 degree approach to the topic makes this more than just a memoir; it's a unique method of storytelling that educates, engages, and occasionally enrages the reader, who will come away with a new understanding of the widespread and often puzzling topic of hearing loss and how it can be overcome, or at least managed. Agent: Jim Levine, Levine Greenberg Literary Agency Inc." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Audiologists agree that were experiencing a national epidemic of hearing loss. At present, 48 million Americans—17 percent of the population—suffer some degree of loss. More than half are under the age of fifty-five. In cases like Katherine Boutons, who experienced sudden hearing loss at the age of thirty, the cause is unknown.

In this deftly written and deeply felt look at a widespread and widely misunderstood phenomenon, Bouton recounts her own journey into deafness—and her return to the hearing world through the miracles of technology. She speaks with doctors, audiologists, neurobiologists, and others searching for causes and a cure, as well as those who have experienced hearing loss, weaving their stories with her own. Shouting Wont Help is an engaging and informative account of what its like to live with an invisible disability—a must-read not only for those with hearing loss, who will recognize their stories in Boutons own, but for their families, friends, employers, and caregivers.

A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013

Synopsis:

For twenty-two years, Katherine Bouton had a secret that grew harder to keep every day. An editor at The New York Times, at daily editorial meetings she couldnt hear what her colleagues were saying. She had gone profoundly deaf in her left ear; her right was getting worse. As she once put it, she was “the kind of person who might have used an ear trumpet in the nineteenth century.”

Audiologists agree that were experiencing a national epidemic of hearing impairment. At present, 50 million Americans suffer some degree of hearing loss—17 percent of the population. And hearing loss is not exclusively a product of growing old. The usual onset is between the ages of nineteen and forty-four, and in many cases the cause is unknown.

Shouting Wont Help is a deftly written, deeply felt look at a widespread and misunderstood phenomenon. In the style of Jerome Groopman and Atul Gawande, and using her experience as a guide, Bouton examines the problem personally, psychologically, and physiologically. She speaks with doctors, audiologists, and neurobiologists, and with a variety of people afflicted with midlife hearing loss, braiding their stories with her own to illuminate the startling effects of the condition.

The result is a surprisingly engaging account of what its like to live with an invisible disability—and a robust prescription for our nations increasing problem with deafness.

About the Author

Katherine Bouton is a former editor at The New York Times, where she worked for The New York Times Magazine and The New York Times Book Review, as well as the daily Science and Culture desks. Her nonfiction has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, and many other magazines and reviews. She is currently a regular reviewer and contributor to Tuesdays Science Times section. She lives in New York City with her husband, Daniel Menaker. They have two grown children.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Janine A, March 20, 2013 (view all comments by Janine A)
I am moderately hard of hearing, and before "Shouting Won't Help", I read many books about hearing loss/deafness. Not one of them captured my experience of hearing loss as well as "Shouting Won't Help". Bouton is smart, brave, and straightforward with the reader about the rough road to accepting hearing impairment. She shows us that amid the deep sorrow of an often invisible (or ignored) disability, there is also hope, knowledge, hilarity, and maybe even a richer life. This is essential reading for anyone with hearing loss, or anyone who has a hearing impaired loved one.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374263041
Author:
Bouton, Katherine
Publisher:
Sarah Crichton Books
Subject:
Hearing
Subject:
Editors, Journalists, Publishers
Subject:
Work-Related Health
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
People with disabilities
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20130231
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes notes/index
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Women
Business » Human Resource Management
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Ear Nose and Throat
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » General Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Hearing and Ears
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Illnesses

Shouting Won't Help: Why I--And 50 Million Other Americans--Can't Hear You New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$26.00 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Sarah Crichton Books - English 9780374263041 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Though she's never been able to pinpoint the cause of her affliction, former New York Times senior editor Bouton remembers the day she began to lose her hearing and suddenly found herself among the ranks of the estimated 275 million people around the world with some type of hearing impairment. She recounts her story and expands it to include the experiences of others (each chapter closes with a profile of a person with a hearing disability, including a British opera singer, a psychoanalyst, and a professor), crafting a study rich in detail and broad in scope that touches on the intricacies of cochlear implants and the increasing amount of ambient noise in our society, as well as the shame, frustration, and guilt the hearing impaired face in the workplace and in private conversation. This 360 degree approach to the topic makes this more than just a memoir; it's a unique method of storytelling that educates, engages, and occasionally enrages the reader, who will come away with a new understanding of the widespread and often puzzling topic of hearing loss and how it can be overcome, or at least managed. Agent: Jim Levine, Levine Greenberg Literary Agency Inc." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , Audiologists agree that were experiencing a national epidemic of hearing loss. At present, 48 million Americans—17 percent of the population—suffer some degree of loss. More than half are under the age of fifty-five. In cases like Katherine Boutons, who experienced sudden hearing loss at the age of thirty, the cause is unknown.

In this deftly written and deeply felt look at a widespread and widely misunderstood phenomenon, Bouton recounts her own journey into deafness—and her return to the hearing world through the miracles of technology. She speaks with doctors, audiologists, neurobiologists, and others searching for causes and a cure, as well as those who have experienced hearing loss, weaving their stories with her own. Shouting Wont Help is an engaging and informative account of what its like to live with an invisible disability—a must-read not only for those with hearing loss, who will recognize their stories in Boutons own, but for their families, friends, employers, and caregivers.

A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013

"Synopsis" by , For twenty-two years, Katherine Bouton had a secret that grew harder to keep every day. An editor at The New York Times, at daily editorial meetings she couldnt hear what her colleagues were saying. She had gone profoundly deaf in her left ear; her right was getting worse. As she once put it, she was “the kind of person who might have used an ear trumpet in the nineteenth century.”

Audiologists agree that were experiencing a national epidemic of hearing impairment. At present, 50 million Americans suffer some degree of hearing loss—17 percent of the population. And hearing loss is not exclusively a product of growing old. The usual onset is between the ages of nineteen and forty-four, and in many cases the cause is unknown.

Shouting Wont Help is a deftly written, deeply felt look at a widespread and misunderstood phenomenon. In the style of Jerome Groopman and Atul Gawande, and using her experience as a guide, Bouton examines the problem personally, psychologically, and physiologically. She speaks with doctors, audiologists, and neurobiologists, and with a variety of people afflicted with midlife hearing loss, braiding their stories with her own to illuminate the startling effects of the condition.

The result is a surprisingly engaging account of what its like to live with an invisible disability—and a robust prescription for our nations increasing problem with deafness.

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