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What a Plant Knows: A Field Guide to the Senses

What a Plant Knows: A Field Guide to the Senses Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“Enough absorbing science to concede that plants continue to inspire and amaze us.” —The Wall Street Journal

How does a Venus flytrap know when to snap shut? Can it feel an insects tiny, spindly legs? And how do cherry blossoms know when to bloom? Can they remember the weather?

     For centuries we have marveled at plant diversity and form—from Charles Darwins early fascination with stems to Seymour Krelborns distorted doting in Little Shop of Horrors. But now, in What a Plant Knows, the renowned biologist Daniel Chamovitz presents an intriguing and scrupulous look at how plants themselves experience the world—from the colors they see to the schedules they keep. Highlighting the latest research in genetics and more, he takes us into the inner lives of plants and draws parallels with the human senses to reveal that we have much more in common with sunflowers and oak trees than we may realize. Chamovitz shows how plants know up from down, how they know when a neighbor has been infested by a group of hungry beetles, and whether they appreciate the Led Zeppelin youve been playing for them or if theyre more partial to the melodic riffs of Bach. Covering touch, sound, smell, sight, and even memory, Chamovitz encourages us to consider whether plants might even be aware.

     A rare inside look at what life is really like for the grass we walk on, the flowers we sniff, and the trees we climb, What a Plant Knows offers us a greater understanding of botany and science and our place in nature.

Review:

"An impressive amount of scientific information and research is packed into this slim volume about plants' perception, but whether this title will interest readers rests entirely on their pre-existing interest in 'the parallels between plant and human senses.' The author, the director of the Manna Center for Plant Biosciences at Tel Aviv University, devotes a chapter to each specific sense: what a plant sees, smells, feels, and hears, how it knows where it is, and what it remembers. Despite an overwhelming amount of detail about the world as seen from a plant's point of view and lucid descriptions of experiments, the stakes of why we should care if plants self-medicate, listen to music, or know to grow upwards are left unarticulated. In the most engaging section of the book, Chamovitz writes that plant memories are not 'semantic or episodic memories... but rather procedural.' Fans of botany and nature writing may be absorbed in learning about plant senses for their own sake, but the book is unlikely to appeal to nonbotanists. Agent: Laurie Abkemeier, DeFiore and Company. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

How does a Venus flytrap know when to snap shut? Can it actually feel an insects tiny, spindly legs? And how do cherry blossoms know when to bloom? Can they actually remember the weather?

 

For centuries we have collectively marveled at plant diversity and form—from Charles Darwins early fascination with stems to Seymour Krelborns distorted doting in Little Shop of Horrors. But now, in What a Plant Knows, the renowned biologist Daniel Chamovitz presents an intriguing and scrupulous look at how plants themselves experience the world—from the colors they see to the schedules they keep. Highlighting the latest research in genetics and more, he takes us into the inner lives of plants and draws parallels with the human senses to reveal that we have much more in common with sunflowers and oak trees than we may realize. Chamovitz shows how plants know up from down, how they know when a neighbor has been infested by a group of hungry beetles, and whether they appreciate the Led Zeppelin youve been playing for them or if theyre more partial to the melodic riffs of Bach. Covering touch, sound, smell, sight, and even memory, Chamovitz encourages us all to consider whether plants might even be aware of their surroundings.

 

A rare inside look at what life is really like for the grass we walk on, the flowers we sniff, and the trees we climb, What a Plant Knows offers us a greater understanding of science and our place in nature.

Synopsis:

“Enough absorbing science to concede that plants continue to inspire and amaze us.” —The Wall Street Journal

How does a Venus flytrap know when to snap shut? Can it feel an insects tiny, spindly legs? And how do cherry blossoms know when to bloom? Can they remember the weather?

     For centuries we have marveled at plant diversity and form—from Charles Darwins early fascination with stems to Seymour Krelborns distorted doting in Little Shop of Horrors. But now, in What a Plant Knows, the renowned biologist Daniel Chamovitz presents an intriguing and scrupulous look at how plants themselves experience the world—from the colors they see to the schedules they keep. Highlighting the latest research in genetics and more, he takes us into the inner lives of plants and draws parallels with the human senses to reveal that we have much more in common with sunflowers and oak trees than we may realize. Chamovitz shows how plants know up from down, how they know when a neighbor has been infested by a group of hungry beetles, and whether they appreciate the Led Zeppelin youve been playing for them or if theyre more partial to the melodic riffs of Bach. Covering touch, sound, smell, sight, and even memory, Chamovitz encourages us to consider whether plants might even be aware.

     A rare inside look at what life is really like for the grass we walk on, the flowers we sniff, and the trees we climb, What a Plant Knows offers us a greater understanding of science and our place in nature.

About the Author

Daniel Chamovitz, Ph.D., is the director of the Manna Center for Plant Biosciences at Tel Aviv University. He has served as a visiting scientist at Yale University and at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and has lectured at universities around the world. His research has appeared in leading scientific journals. Chamovitz lives with his wife and three children in Hod HaSharon, Israel.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374288730
Subtitle:
A Field Guide to the Senses
Publisher:
Scientific American / Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Author:
Chamovitz, Daniel
Author:
D
Author:
aniel Chamovitz
Subject:
Botany
Subject:
Plants - General
Subject:
General
Subject:
Gardening : General
Subject:
Botany-General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20130430
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Illustrations:
28 Black-and-White Illustrations/Notes/I
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

Related Subjects

» Featured Titles » Science
» Home and Garden » Gardening » Botany
» Home and Garden » Gardening » General
» Science and Mathematics » Botany » General
» Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Botany

What a Plant Knows: A Field Guide to the Senses
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 192 pages Scientific American - English 9780374288730 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "An impressive amount of scientific information and research is packed into this slim volume about plants' perception, but whether this title will interest readers rests entirely on their pre-existing interest in 'the parallels between plant and human senses.' The author, the director of the Manna Center for Plant Biosciences at Tel Aviv University, devotes a chapter to each specific sense: what a plant sees, smells, feels, and hears, how it knows where it is, and what it remembers. Despite an overwhelming amount of detail about the world as seen from a plant's point of view and lucid descriptions of experiments, the stakes of why we should care if plants self-medicate, listen to music, or know to grow upwards are left unarticulated. In the most engaging section of the book, Chamovitz writes that plant memories are not 'semantic or episodic memories... but rather procedural.' Fans of botany and nature writing may be absorbed in learning about plant senses for their own sake, but the book is unlikely to appeal to nonbotanists. Agent: Laurie Abkemeier, DeFiore and Company. (June)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,

How does a Venus flytrap know when to snap shut? Can it actually feel an insects tiny, spindly legs? And how do cherry blossoms know when to bloom? Can they actually remember the weather?

 

For centuries we have collectively marveled at plant diversity and form—from Charles Darwins early fascination with stems to Seymour Krelborns distorted doting in Little Shop of Horrors. But now, in What a Plant Knows, the renowned biologist Daniel Chamovitz presents an intriguing and scrupulous look at how plants themselves experience the world—from the colors they see to the schedules they keep. Highlighting the latest research in genetics and more, he takes us into the inner lives of plants and draws parallels with the human senses to reveal that we have much more in common with sunflowers and oak trees than we may realize. Chamovitz shows how plants know up from down, how they know when a neighbor has been infested by a group of hungry beetles, and whether they appreciate the Led Zeppelin youve been playing for them or if theyre more partial to the melodic riffs of Bach. Covering touch, sound, smell, sight, and even memory, Chamovitz encourages us all to consider whether plants might even be aware of their surroundings.

 

A rare inside look at what life is really like for the grass we walk on, the flowers we sniff, and the trees we climb, What a Plant Knows offers us a greater understanding of science and our place in nature.

"Synopsis" by ,
“Enough absorbing science to concede that plants continue to inspire and amaze us.” —The Wall Street Journal

How does a Venus flytrap know when to snap shut? Can it feel an insects tiny, spindly legs? And how do cherry blossoms know when to bloom? Can they remember the weather?

     For centuries we have marveled at plant diversity and form—from Charles Darwins early fascination with stems to Seymour Krelborns distorted doting in Little Shop of Horrors. But now, in What a Plant Knows, the renowned biologist Daniel Chamovitz presents an intriguing and scrupulous look at how plants themselves experience the world—from the colors they see to the schedules they keep. Highlighting the latest research in genetics and more, he takes us into the inner lives of plants and draws parallels with the human senses to reveal that we have much more in common with sunflowers and oak trees than we may realize. Chamovitz shows how plants know up from down, how they know when a neighbor has been infested by a group of hungry beetles, and whether they appreciate the Led Zeppelin youve been playing for them or if theyre more partial to the melodic riffs of Bach. Covering touch, sound, smell, sight, and even memory, Chamovitz encourages us to consider whether plants might even be aware.

     A rare inside look at what life is really like for the grass we walk on, the flowers we sniff, and the trees we climb, What a Plant Knows offers us a greater understanding of science and our place in nature.

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