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Writers Writing Dying: Poems

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Writers Writing Dying: Poems Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Since his first poetry collection, Lies, C. K. Williams has nurtured an incomparable reputation—as a deeply moral poet, a writer of profound emotion, and a teller of compelling stories. In Writers Writing Dying, he retains the essential parts of his poetic identity—his candor, the drama of his verses, the social conscience of his themes—while slyly reinventing himself, re-casting his voice, and in many poems examining the personal—sexual desire, the hubris of youth, the looming specter of death—more bluntly and bravely than ever. In “Prose,” he confronts his nineteen year-old self, who despairs of writing poetry, with the question “How could anyone know this little?” In a poem of meditation, “The Day Continues Lovely,” he radically expands the scale of his attention: “Meanwhile cosmos roars on with so many voices we cant hear ourselves think. Galaxy on. Galaxy off.  Universe on, but another just behind this one . . . ” Even the poets own purpose is questioned; in “Draft 23” he asks, “Between scribble and slash—are we trying to change the world by changing the words?” With this wildly vibrant collection—by turns funny, moving, and surprising—Williams proves once again that, he has, in Michael Hofmanns words, “as much scope and truthfulness as any American poet since Lowell and Berryman.”

Review:

"Williams, one of America's most celebrated poets, now in his 70s, has been thinking out loud about death — his own — concertedly over his past several books, but this is the first time he's really having fun, taking a jaunty stroll toward oblivion, departing a life wasted 'Sucking up another dumb movie on HBO' to reckon with his masters, the poets whose enduring lines have left him, as he says memorably in the book's opening poem 'whacked so hard that you bash the already broken crown of your head.' In a poem about poetry's capacity to ease depression, he asks, 'Who should I be reading? Let's see. Neruda? No way, too rich./ Lowell and Larkin, good god, we're already in the pits....' In talky lines like these, thick with self-mocking irony, Williams is able to embody, if not confront, his growing fear, offering a strong dose of sideways empathy at the same time. Williams charges ahead, racing to get out of his own control — 'Think, write, write, think: just keep galloping faster and you won't even notice you're dead,' he says in the book's title poem — making for his most thrilling book in years." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Since his first poetry collection, Lies, C. K. Williams has nurtured an incomparable reputation—as a deeply moral poet, a writer of profound emotion, and a teller of compelling stories. In Writers Writing Dying, he retains the essential parts of his poetic identity—his candor, the drama of his verses, the social conscience of his themes—while slyly reinventing himself, re-casting his voice, and in many poems examining the personal—sexual desire, the hubris of youth, the looming specter of death—more bluntly and bravely than ever. In “Prose,” he confronts his nineteen year-old self, who despairs of writing poetry, with the question “How could anyone know this little?” In a poem of meditation, “The Day Continues Lovely,” he radically expands the scale of his attention: “Meanwhile cosmos roars on with so many voices we cant hear ourselves think. Galaxy on. Galaxy off.  Universe on, but another just behind this one . . . ” Even the poets own purpose is questioned; in “Draft 23” he asks, “Between scribble and slash—are we trying to change the world by changing the words?” With this wildly vibrant collection—by turns funny, moving, and surprising—Williams proves once again that, he has, in Michael Hofmanns words, “as much scope and truthfulness as any American poet since Lowell and Berryman.”

About the Author

C.K. Williamss books of poetry include Flesh and Blood, which won the National Book Critics Award; Repair, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry; and The Singing, winner of the National Book Award.  He was awarded the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize in 2005. He has written a critical study, On Whitman; a memoir, Misgivings; and two books of essays, the most recent of which is In Time: Poets, Poems, and the Rest.  He teaches at Princeton University and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374293321
Author:
Williams, C K
Publisher:
Farrar Straus Giroux
Author:
Williams, C. K.
Subject:
Single Author / American
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20121031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
80
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z
History and Social Science » World History » General

Writers Writing Dying: Poems Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.50 In Stock
Product details 80 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374293321 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Williams, one of America's most celebrated poets, now in his 70s, has been thinking out loud about death — his own — concertedly over his past several books, but this is the first time he's really having fun, taking a jaunty stroll toward oblivion, departing a life wasted 'Sucking up another dumb movie on HBO' to reckon with his masters, the poets whose enduring lines have left him, as he says memorably in the book's opening poem 'whacked so hard that you bash the already broken crown of your head.' In a poem about poetry's capacity to ease depression, he asks, 'Who should I be reading? Let's see. Neruda? No way, too rich./ Lowell and Larkin, good god, we're already in the pits....' In talky lines like these, thick with self-mocking irony, Williams is able to embody, if not confront, his growing fear, offering a strong dose of sideways empathy at the same time. Williams charges ahead, racing to get out of his own control — 'Think, write, write, think: just keep galloping faster and you won't even notice you're dead,' he says in the book's title poem — making for his most thrilling book in years." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,

Since his first poetry collection, Lies, C. K. Williams has nurtured an incomparable reputation—as a deeply moral poet, a writer of profound emotion, and a teller of compelling stories. In Writers Writing Dying, he retains the essential parts of his poetic identity—his candor, the drama of his verses, the social conscience of his themes—while slyly reinventing himself, re-casting his voice, and in many poems examining the personal—sexual desire, the hubris of youth, the looming specter of death—more bluntly and bravely than ever. In “Prose,” he confronts his nineteen year-old self, who despairs of writing poetry, with the question “How could anyone know this little?” In a poem of meditation, “The Day Continues Lovely,” he radically expands the scale of his attention: “Meanwhile cosmos roars on with so many voices we cant hear ourselves think. Galaxy on. Galaxy off.  Universe on, but another just behind this one . . . ” Even the poets own purpose is questioned; in “Draft 23” he asks, “Between scribble and slash—are we trying to change the world by changing the words?” With this wildly vibrant collection—by turns funny, moving, and surprising—Williams proves once again that, he has, in Michael Hofmanns words, “as much scope and truthfulness as any American poet since Lowell and Berryman.”

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