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The Joys of Love

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

During the summer of 1946, twenty-year-old Elizabeth is doing what she has dreamed of since she was a little girl: working in the theatre. Elizabeth is passionate about her work and determined to learn all she can at the summer theatre company on the sea where she is an apprentice actress. Shes never felt so alive. And soon she finds another passion: Kurt Canitz, the dashing young director of the company, and the first man Elizabeths ever kissed who has really meant something to her. Then Elizabeths perfect summer is profoundly shaken when Kurt turns out not to be the kind of man she thought he was.

Moving and romantic, this coming-of-age story was written during the 1940s. As revealed in an introduction by the authors granddaughter Léna Roy, the protagonist Elizabeth is close to an autobiographical portrait of LEngle herself as a young woman—“vibrant, vulnerable, and yearning for love and all that life has to offer.”

Review:

"Written in the late '40s but not taken on by L'Engle's agent, this posthumously published novel is more artifact than timeless story. As such, it will primarily interest readers who want to know more about the author of the groundbreaking A Wrinkle in Time, especially because an introduction by L'Engle's granddaughter Lna Roy identifies it as semiautobiographical. Elizabeth, like L'Engle a graduate of Smith College, has convinced her controlling guardian aunt to let her take a scholarship apprenticeship at a summer theater, even though her aunt vigorously opposes Elizabeth's lifelong passion for the stage. Set over a long weekend, the action revolves around Elizabeth's infatuation with a womanizing director from the city and her subsequent disillusionment; luckily a decent fellow is around to pledge his love to her. Even with a veil thrown over the characters' sex lives, L'Engle suggests the intimacy, good and bad, within a theater company, and her dialogue pungently evokes the period. The tidiness of the resolutions betrays the inexperience of the writer — which, paradoxically, may endear this work to L'Engle fans. And although the conflicts are dated, the heroine's yearnings often transcend the '40s setting. Ages 12 — up. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

A young woman immerses herself in theatre life—and love

Synopsis:

During the summer of 1946, twenty-year-old Elizabeth is doing what she has dreamed of since she was a little girl: working in the theatre. Elizabeth is passionate about her work and determined to learn all she can at the summer theatre company on the sea where she is an apprentice actress. Shes never felt so alive. And soon she finds another passion: Kurt Canitz, the dashing young director of the company, and the first man Elizabeths ever kissed who has really meant something to her. Then Elizabeths perfect summer is profoundly shaken when Kurt turns out not to be the kind of man she thought he was.

Moving and romantic, this coming-of-age story was written during the 1940s. As revealed in an introduction by the authors granddaughter Léna Roy, the protagonist Elizabeth is close to an autobiographical portrait of LEngle herself as a young woman—“vibrant, vulnerable, and yearning for love and all that life has to offer.”

Synopsis:

This moving and romantic coming-of-age story was written during the 1940s. As revealed in an introduction by the authors granddaughter Léna Roy, the protagonist Elizabeth is close to an autobiographical portrait of

LEngle herself as a young woman—“vibrant, vulnerable, and yearning for love and all that life has to offer.”

About the Author

MADELEINE LENGLE is the author of many books for children and adults. She is perhaps best known for the Time Quintet, especially A Wrinkle in Time, which won a Newbery Medal, and her books featuring the Austin Family, including the Newbery Honor Book A Ring of Endless Light. She lives in Connecticut.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780374338701
Publisher:
Square Fish
Subject:
Theater
Author:
L'Engle, Madeleine
Author:
Reed, Maggi-Meg
Author:
Roy, Lena
Subject:
Acting
Subject:
Social Issues - New Experience
Subject:
Love & Romance
Subject:
Situations / New Experience
Subject:
Love stories
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-New Experience
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Subject:
Social Issues/New E
Subject:
xperience
Edition Description:
Young Adult Fiction
Publication Date:
20120605
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
from 7 up to 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
6 CDs/7 hrs
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
5.24 x 5.65 x 0.8 in
Age Level:
12-17

Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » 20th Century
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » New Experience
Young Adult » General

The Joys of Love
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 288 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374338701 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Written in the late '40s but not taken on by L'Engle's agent, this posthumously published novel is more artifact than timeless story. As such, it will primarily interest readers who want to know more about the author of the groundbreaking A Wrinkle in Time, especially because an introduction by L'Engle's granddaughter Lna Roy identifies it as semiautobiographical. Elizabeth, like L'Engle a graduate of Smith College, has convinced her controlling guardian aunt to let her take a scholarship apprenticeship at a summer theater, even though her aunt vigorously opposes Elizabeth's lifelong passion for the stage. Set over a long weekend, the action revolves around Elizabeth's infatuation with a womanizing director from the city and her subsequent disillusionment; luckily a decent fellow is around to pledge his love to her. Even with a veil thrown over the characters' sex lives, L'Engle suggests the intimacy, good and bad, within a theater company, and her dialogue pungently evokes the period. The tidiness of the resolutions betrays the inexperience of the writer — which, paradoxically, may endear this work to L'Engle fans. And although the conflicts are dated, the heroine's yearnings often transcend the '40s setting. Ages 12 — up. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,

A young woman immerses herself in theatre life—and love

"Synopsis" by ,
During the summer of 1946, twenty-year-old Elizabeth is doing what she has dreamed of since she was a little girl: working in the theatre. Elizabeth is passionate about her work and determined to learn all she can at the summer theatre company on the sea where she is an apprentice actress. Shes never felt so alive. And soon she finds another passion: Kurt Canitz, the dashing young director of the company, and the first man Elizabeths ever kissed who has really meant something to her. Then Elizabeths perfect summer is profoundly shaken when Kurt turns out not to be the kind of man she thought he was.

Moving and romantic, this coming-of-age story was written during the 1940s. As revealed in an introduction by the authors granddaughter Léna Roy, the protagonist Elizabeth is close to an autobiographical portrait of LEngle herself as a young woman—“vibrant, vulnerable, and yearning for love and all that life has to offer.”

"Synopsis" by ,
This moving and romantic coming-of-age story was written during the 1940s. As revealed in an introduction by the authors granddaughter Léna Roy, the protagonist Elizabeth is close to an autobiographical portrait of

LEngle herself as a young woman—“vibrant, vulnerable, and yearning for love and all that life has to offer.”

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