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The Fixer

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The Fixer Cover

ISBN13: 9780374529383
ISBN10: 0374529388
Condition: Standard
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Awards

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A classic that won Malamud both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award

The Fixer (1966) is Bernard Malamud's best-known and most acclaimed novel — one that makes manifest his roots in Russian fiction, especially that of Isaac Babel.

Set in Kiev in 1911 during a period of heightened anti-Semitism, the novel tells the story of Yakov Bok, a Jewish handyman blamed for the brutal murder of a young Russian boy. Bok leaves his village to try his luck in Kiev, and after denying his Jewish identity, finds himself working for a member of the anti-Semitic Black Hundreds Society. When the boy is found nearly drained of blood in a cave, the Black Hundreds accuse the Jews of ritual murder. Arrested and imprisoned, Bok refuses to confess to a crime that he did not commit.

Review:

"One of Malamud's extraordinary gifts has always been for lifting the realistic world one level up, into the realm of metaphysical fantasy. Another has been to take life, lives, seriously." Malcolm Bradbury

Review:

"The Fixer deserves to rank alongside the Great Jewish-American novels of Saul Bellow and Philip Roth." Independent

Review:

"Brilliant [and] harrowing....Historical reality combined with fictional skill and beauty of a high order make [it] a novel of startling importance." Elizabeth Hardwick, Vogue

Review:

"What makes it a great book, above and beyond its glowing goodness, has to do with something else altogether: its necessity....This novel, like all great novels reminds us that we must do something." Jonathan Safran Foer, author of Everything Is Illuminated

Review:

"A literary event in any season." Eliot Fremont-Smith, The New York Times

Synopsis:

Kiev in 1911, between the 1905 revolution and the overthrow of Russia's last Tsar, is 'a medieval city full of wild superstition and mysticism' — and a cauldron of anti-Semitism. When a twelve-year-old Russian boy is found stabbed to death, his body drained of blood, the Jews are accused of ritual child murder.

Yakov Blok, a handyman (or 'fixer'), is blamed and then arrested and imprisoned without indictment. As the accusations against him mutate and multiply and public involvement intensifies his suffering, acquittal comes to seem as terrifying as conviction.

Published in 1966, The Fixer won Bernard Malamud both the Pulitzer Prize and his second National Book Award.

Synopsis:

The Fixer is the winner of the 1967 National Book Award for Fiction and the 1967 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

The Fixer (1966) is Bernard Malamud's best-known and most acclaimed novel — one that makes manifest his roots in Russian fiction, especially that of Isaac Babel.

Set in Kiev in 1911 during a period of heightened anti-Semitism, the novel tells the story of Yakov Bok, a Jewish handyman blamed for the brutal murder of a young Russian boy. Bok leaves his village to try his luck in Kiev, and after denying his Jewish identity, finds himself working for a member of the anti-Semitic Black Hundreds Society. When the boy is found nearly drained of blood in a cave, the Black Hundreds accuse the Jews of ritual murder. Arrested and imprisoned, Bok refuses to confess to a crime that he did not commit.

About the Author

Bernard Malamud (1914–1986) wrote eight novels; he won the Pulizer Prize and the National Book Award for The Fixer, and the National Book Award for The Magic Barrel, a book of stories. Born in Brooklyn, he taught for many years at Bennington College in Vermont.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

lukas, January 15, 2014 (view all comments by lukas)
I've been reading a lot of post-war Jewish-American authors (Bellow, Mailer, Roth) and hadn't really been all that impressed with Malamud until this book, which won both the Pulitzer and the National Book Award. It is so much better and more powerful than his other books that it almost feels like the work of another writer. Set in Russia in the early 1900s, it's the story of a poor Jewish handyman (a fixer) whose wife has left him so he ventures to Kiev, where he finds work but is soon falsely accused of a vicious murder and imprisoned. The situation is a little like Kafka, but rooted in the brutality of history and the virulent anti-Semitism of the period. Malamud creates enormous sympathy for his unfortunate protagonist as well as stirring up anger at the staggering injustice. It's one of the most moving and harrowing books I've ever read about Jewish identity and anti-Semitism.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780374529383
Introduction:
Safran Foer, Jonathan
Publisher:
Farrar Straus Giroux
Introduction by:
Safran Foer, Jonathan
Introduction:
Safran Foer, Jonathan
Author:
Foer, Jonathan Safran
Author:
Malamud, Bernard
Author:
Safran Foer, Jonathan
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Jews
Subject:
Trials (Murder)
Subject:
Historical fiction
Subject:
Legal stories
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
20040531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
8.28 x 5.46 x 0.95 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books

The Fixer Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.50 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Farrar Straus Giroux - English 9780374529383 Reviews:
"Review" by , "One of Malamud's extraordinary gifts has always been for lifting the realistic world one level up, into the realm of metaphysical fantasy. Another has been to take life, lives, seriously."
"Review" by , "The Fixer deserves to rank alongside the Great Jewish-American novels of Saul Bellow and Philip Roth."
"Review" by , "Brilliant [and] harrowing....Historical reality combined with fictional skill and beauty of a high order make [it] a novel of startling importance."
"Review" by , "What makes it a great book, above and beyond its glowing goodness, has to do with something else altogether: its necessity....This novel, like all great novels reminds us that we must do something."
"Review" by , "A literary event in any season."
"Synopsis" by , Kiev in 1911, between the 1905 revolution and the overthrow of Russia's last Tsar, is 'a medieval city full of wild superstition and mysticism' — and a cauldron of anti-Semitism. When a twelve-year-old Russian boy is found stabbed to death, his body drained of blood, the Jews are accused of ritual child murder.

Yakov Blok, a handyman (or 'fixer'), is blamed and then arrested and imprisoned without indictment. As the accusations against him mutate and multiply and public involvement intensifies his suffering, acquittal comes to seem as terrifying as conviction.

Published in 1966, The Fixer won Bernard Malamud both the Pulitzer Prize and his second National Book Award.

"Synopsis" by ,
The Fixer is the winner of the 1967 National Book Award for Fiction and the 1967 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

The Fixer (1966) is Bernard Malamud's best-known and most acclaimed novel — one that makes manifest his roots in Russian fiction, especially that of Isaac Babel.

Set in Kiev in 1911 during a period of heightened anti-Semitism, the novel tells the story of Yakov Bok, a Jewish handyman blamed for the brutal murder of a young Russian boy. Bok leaves his village to try his luck in Kiev, and after denying his Jewish identity, finds himself working for a member of the anti-Semitic Black Hundreds Society. When the boy is found nearly drained of blood in a cave, the Black Hundreds accuse the Jews of ritual murder. Arrested and imprisoned, Bok refuses to confess to a crime that he did not commit.

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