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Sputnik Sweetheart

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Sputnik Sweetheart Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Combining the early, straightforward seductions of Norwegian Wood and the complex mysteries of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, this new novel – his seventh translated into English – is Haruki Murakami at his most satisfying and representative best.

The scenario is as simple as it is uncomfortable: a college student falls in love (once and for all, despite everything that transpires afterward) with a classmate whose devotion to Kerouac and an untidy writerly life precludes any personal commitments – until she meets a considerably older and far more sophisticated businesswoman. It is through this wormhole that she enters Murakami?s surreal yet humane universe, to which she serves as guide both for us and for her frustrated suitor, now a teacher. In the course of her travels from parochial Japan through Europe and ultimately to an island off the coast of Greece, she disappears without a trace, leaving only lineaments of her fate: computer accounts of bizarre events and stories within stories. The teacher, summoned to assist in the search for her, experiences his own ominous, haunting visions, which lead him nowhere but home to Japan – and there, under the expanse of deep space and the still-orbiting Sputnik, he finally achieves a true understanding of his beloved.

A love story, a missing-person story, a detective story – all enveloped in a philosophical mystery – and, finally, a profound meditation on human longing.

Review:

"Murakami has an unmatched gift for turning psychological metaphors into uncanny narratives....In [his] books, the quiet rumblings in the back of our minds are allowed to erupt; his stories delicately track the lava flow....Sputnik Sweetheart...offers an elegant distillation of Murakami's cool surrealism. Like a de Chirico painting, the book captures a reality 'one step out of line, a cardigan with the buttons done up wrong.' It is less raucous than his early novels, with their incessant pop culture references. At this more mature stage in his career, Murakami speaks in a subtler language, one that blankets the internal and external world with melancholy." Daniel Zalewski, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

Trying to nail down the seductive, surreal melancholy of Haruki Murakami's novels is like trying to bottle fog. His characters can be found drifting around Tokyo, checking out French new wave movies, drinking glasses of red wine, listening to Brahms on their hi-fis, reading Raymond Chandler — almost always alone. A Murakami hero is the well-groomed guy sitting by himself at the end of the counter in an all-night coffee shop, smoking perhaps and staring off into space. Chances are he's puzzled over a recent encounter with an enigmatic woman. Chances are she's disappeared. And chances are he won't ever quite figure out what's happened to her.

Sputnik Sweetheart is a slim novel in comparison with Murakami's most recent opus, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. (Norwegian Wood is a very early book published in the U.S. for the first time last year.) Its unnamed narrator remains true to Murakami form, a teacher by "a process of elimination" — he simply isn't engaged enough to try for a more demanding career. The one thing he does care about is an old college friend, Sumire, a misfit girl with literary ambitions who, much to his pain, has no feelings for him "as a man." They're close enough, though, that when Sumire finally does fall in love with her wine-importer employer — a beautiful married woman 17 years her senior — he's the one to hear all about it.

The first 70 pages or so of Sputnik Sweetheart construct this romantic triangle: He loves Sumire, Sumire loves Miu, and whatever goes on in Miu's head is anyone's guess. Then Miu takes Sumire with her on a trip to Europe, and while the two women vacation on a Greek island, Sumire vanishes without a trace. Miu asks the narrator to fly out to the island and help with the search. Once there, he finds a handful of tantalizing clues: an odd conversation Miu and Sumire had about a spooked cat, a diary that Sumire kept on a floppy disk in which she writes of "entering the world of dreams and never coming out. Living in dreams for the rest of time," and, strangest of all, Sumire's transcript of a secret Miu told her, the story of how Miu's black hair turned entirely white during a single night in a little Swiss town.

Murakami knows that the most haunting tales never have all their loose ends tied up by the last page, but unlike The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Sputnik Sweetheart doesn't leave too many of them unspooled and dangling. It's a tighter book, if less grand and captivating, and the point of this exercise in the uncanny feels more focused. "Why do people have to be this lonely?" the narrator asks:

I closed my eyes and listened carefully for the descendants of Sputnik, even now circling the earth, gravity their only tie to the planet. Lonely metal souls in the unimpeded darkness of space, they meet, pass each other, and part, never to meet again. No words passing between them. No promises to keep.

Back in Japan, there will be a significant moment with a kleptomaniac child and a few more surprising encounters, but the lovely, sad, eerie Murakami spell remains firmly in place, the sense of its perfectly still center inviolate. It's still impossible to nail down, but its ingredients include loneliness, longing and an undeniable and sometimes frightening thread of the miraculous woven into the very fabric of life.
- Laura Miller, Salon.com

About the Author

HARUKI MURAKAMI was born in Kyoto in 1949 and now lives in Tokyo. He is the author of several novels, including Norwegian Wood, Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, and A Wild Sheep Chase, and of Underground, a new work of nonfiction. Murakami's work has been translated into sixteen languages.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375411694
Translator:
Gabriel, Philip
Author:
Gabriel, Philip
Author:
Murakami, Haruki
Author:
Gabriel, Philip
Publisher:
Random House
Location:
New York
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Teachers
Subject:
Japan
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Women novelists
Subject:
Missing persons
Subject:
Businesswomen
Subject:
Unrequited love.
Edition Number:
1st American ed.
Series Volume:
116
Publication Date:
April 2001
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.70x5.88x1.04 in. .89 lbs.

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Related Subjects


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Sputnik Sweetheart Used Hardcover
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Product details 224 pages Alfred A. Knopf - English 9780375411694 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Murakami has an unmatched gift for turning psychological metaphors into uncanny narratives....In [his] books, the quiet rumblings in the back of our minds are allowed to erupt; his stories delicately track the lava flow....Sputnik Sweetheart...offers an elegant distillation of Murakami's cool surrealism. Like a de Chirico painting, the book captures a reality 'one step out of line, a cardigan with the buttons done up wrong.' It is less raucous than his early novels, with their incessant pop culture references. At this more mature stage in his career, Murakami speaks in a subtler language, one that blankets the internal and external world with melancholy."
"Review" by ,

Trying to nail down the seductive, surreal melancholy of Haruki Murakami's novels is like trying to bottle fog. His characters can be found drifting around Tokyo, checking out French new wave movies, drinking glasses of red wine, listening to Brahms on their hi-fis, reading Raymond Chandler — almost always alone. A Murakami hero is the well-groomed guy sitting by himself at the end of the counter in an all-night coffee shop, smoking perhaps and staring off into space. Chances are he's puzzled over a recent encounter with an enigmatic woman. Chances are she's disappeared. And chances are he won't ever quite figure out what's happened to her.

Sputnik Sweetheart is a slim novel in comparison with Murakami's most recent opus, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. (Norwegian Wood is a very early book published in the U.S. for the first time last year.) Its unnamed narrator remains true to Murakami form, a teacher by "a process of elimination" — he simply isn't engaged enough to try for a more demanding career. The one thing he does care about is an old college friend, Sumire, a misfit girl with literary ambitions who, much to his pain, has no feelings for him "as a man." They're close enough, though, that when Sumire finally does fall in love with her wine-importer employer — a beautiful married woman 17 years her senior — he's the one to hear all about it.

The first 70 pages or so of Sputnik Sweetheart construct this romantic triangle: He loves Sumire, Sumire loves Miu, and whatever goes on in Miu's head is anyone's guess. Then Miu takes Sumire with her on a trip to Europe, and while the two women vacation on a Greek island, Sumire vanishes without a trace. Miu asks the narrator to fly out to the island and help with the search. Once there, he finds a handful of tantalizing clues: an odd conversation Miu and Sumire had about a spooked cat, a diary that Sumire kept on a floppy disk in which she writes of "entering the world of dreams and never coming out. Living in dreams for the rest of time," and, strangest of all, Sumire's transcript of a secret Miu told her, the story of how Miu's black hair turned entirely white during a single night in a little Swiss town.

Murakami knows that the most haunting tales never have all their loose ends tied up by the last page, but unlike The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Sputnik Sweetheart doesn't leave too many of them unspooled and dangling. It's a tighter book, if less grand and captivating, and the point of this exercise in the uncanny feels more focused. "Why do people have to be this lonely?" the narrator asks:

I closed my eyes and listened carefully for the descendants of Sputnik, even now circling the earth, gravity their only tie to the planet. Lonely metal souls in the unimpeded darkness of space, they meet, pass each other, and part, never to meet again. No words passing between them. No promises to keep.

Back in Japan, there will be a significant moment with a kleptomaniac child and a few more surprising encounters, but the lovely, sad, eerie Murakami spell remains firmly in place, the sense of its perfectly still center inviolate. It's still impossible to nail down, but its ingredients include loneliness, longing and an undeniable and sometimes frightening thread of the miraculous woven into the very fabric of life.

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